The Standard Union from Brooklyn, New York on July 20, 1902 · 13
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The Standard Union from Brooklyn, New York · 13

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Sunday, July 20, 1902
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;.1ILY BTAa .D UNIi BKCJKLYN, SU1IDAY. JULY 20. 3002. ! ; cmtiis. Brighton Beach Music Hall and the Manhattan Beach Theatre Have . . Good Attractions. I Tills A ! I,KO0 3.30 1 -i . ' - ) f. L in POPULAR COKCT Every Bvmlnc 1)111190 AMtelir Except Hunday KALl a3 at8P.il, Itfil 0ran in tomtiienoinir To-morrow Ifcvtr PRi : WEEKS. DSCXSi-L MAI AT K- a t HB rolling surf at Brighton had many thousand? ot visitors during last week, who. Incidentally, forsook the monotonous sound of breaking waves for the more harmonious musio and other good things in Grovers comfortable Music HalL Typical beach weather filled " the house at every performance, partlcu-, 'larly at the matinees, which were llb-. erally attended. Children by scores flocked to see Rose Nanyons trained birds and Batty s bears. This afternoon and evening these two features, as well ' as McIntyre and Heath, Jordan and (Welsh, Carter DeHaven Trio, the Andalusians and bthers will appear for the last times. To-morrow and all week I the attractions Will be Lewis and Ryan, In "The Twd Actors i the wonderful 'Kaufmann Troupe of Cyclists, seven In Inumber, several of whose feats are of i the kind to make an audience hold Its breath, Claude Thardo, a pronounced favorite In Brooklyn, 'will sing popular songs Mr, Thardo, who Is sometimes called "The Sidewheeler, has a large following, and the Claude Thardo Club has decided to attend in a body, having secured a large block of seats for the purpose. Delmore and Lee' bring a European novelty In a startling aerial, re-i.volvlng bar act, which Is not attempted by any others. Mabel Hudson, a band-some young lady, is billed as a high-class vocallBt, who has created a furore recently in Europe, whence she comes highly commended. One of the best Euro-;pean newspapers said that "She has a fine stage presence, and a clear, tuneful voice." Pauline Moran and her picanln-nles will prove a strong number In an excellent bill. Slafers Brooklyn Marine Band will give the usual concert on the stage, and a well-selected programme will make It as entertaining as ever. Hick Brown and his orohestra will play "Dreamy Eyes'1 as an overture, which will bring out a cornet , solo by the leader. 5 ' i . , - 1 . ,, PRIMROSE AND DOCKSTADER iv AT MANHATTAN BEACH. ' Of the numerous good theatrical attractions placed before our fastidious ,publlo this' season, that 'of Primrose and 'Dockstader and their company ot -min-r stdel talent, which opens to-morrow night at the Manhattan Beach Theatre, (, Is assuredly the best. Prom curtain- rise to flnale.fone continued round of effervescent merriment and fun greets the eurj Hor Is this- all, the entertaining, the beautiful and the marvelous, furnish food for all, whether It be the blase first-nighter or the most Insatiate Of! minds among the gallery gods. At one time in the history of entertainment It was thought that minstrelsy had seen Its best days, but this was only wben promoters had failed to grasp Its true inwardness. It has come to be 'that again Is minstrelsy to the fore not the old-time 'minstrelsy of a comic song or two in j nearly the same air and key, a few Jokes hoary with age that would need a .Nation hatchet to crack, a few minutes painful with sounds ot rattling bones r . and wheezy banjoes, but the newer, 1, $ 1 freBher, livelier minstrelsy of the elec- s1 Itrlcol age, when everything goes with a vim,' a dash and a sparkle that often causes even the best informed as to the novelties and Innovations of the new Century to Inquire! "What wonderful .thing will be done next Minstrelsy ( according to what it typifies has been the magic watchword with these premiers of the burnt-cork fraternity, and minstrelsy that pleases Is what has been the result of their efforts to please patrons and friend who, comprehending their efforts, have responded with such hearty appreciation that wherever this great company visits, houses are crowded to repletion with a host of well-satisfied spectators. ' ) CHILDRENS NIGHT " AT ANCIENT ROME. i I The week Just past has been a prosperous one for those who deal In fire, and Ancient Rome," though It has been burned five times during the past week. Id equal to another roast.-' To-morrow will be the first of the "Childrens Night, and a special and hu morons programme has been prepared for their edification. Thursday will be Irish Night" In the amphitheatre at Manhattan Beach, and if Shannons Band dont recall memories of the old times when Gilmore played his audience back to toe times when "The Harp that Once Through Tara's Halls caught the Irish spirit of toe crowd, It will be because he bun become converted over to Wagnerisirt. Saturday the Twenty-.thlrd Regiment will bX on hand, and as that will be Twentylthlrd Regiment Night a great military gathering may be expected. -, f 1 NQJES. 1 Miss Jessie McAlister, of the Spooner Stock Company, has returned to Brooklyn after two weeks at her boms In Franklin, Pa. j i Ben F. Wilson, of toe Spooner Company, who is now at his home in Centre-vllle, -Rl, leaves this evening for Brooklyn, and will arrive on Wednesday. Max Figman will again be seen as a member of Mrs. Flske s company, and he ,-wlll appear In "Mary of Magda la.r James Young has also been re-engaged. "King Highball" Is toe latest title to ibe used tor musical extravaganza, to be produced by the Rice Amusement 'Company, under direction of E. E. Rice. I Isaac Payton, of the Spooner Company, who has been at his boms in Centrevllle, bis gone to Chicago to arrange for some Western plays for production next season at the Bijou. Klaw and Erlanger have decided to call toe new, theatre they will build on Forty-second street, Manhattan, next season for the Rogers Brothers The Liberty Theatre." In addition to "The Taming of the Shrew," Charles B. Hanford will be . seen, the coming eeason, in another of Shakespeare's comedies, "Much Ado About Nothing. May Robson, toe comedienne, has been engaged as on of the principals of the support Of Jerome Sykes In Harry B, Smith and Gus Kerkers new musical corned yi "The Billionaire. . GrOcei George Is summering at Anbury I Park, Saving given up her usual trip 1 abroad (that she may devote her personal attention to the play being written for tier use next season, Joseph! Hart and Carrie De Mar are summerllig at White Lake, Kanneon-pa, N. la They will return shortly to resume tlielr tour In Foxy Grandpa,' which oplns Aug. 11 at Atlantic City. Lee Arthur has submitted to Klaw Erlangor file first draft of tho dramatic Mark Twain "Huckleberry ch, these gentlemen announce, 1 be a great play and produc- 1 verslon Finn, wl promises tlon I E. Burked Scott will be business man ger toe coming season for "The Liberty Belles, which will make an extended tour of all toe principal cities from toe Atlantia Coast as far West as Denver. Charles F. Towle, toe former Washington correspondent, who Was the acting manager of toe American production of "Ben-Hur last season, will continue In this capacity during the coming tout of this play, , -'i 'Way Down East will be seen next season only in cities in which it has already played two or three engagements. William A. Bradys perennial rural drama seems to be unique In the lasting qualities of its charm. , i n , t "Peggy From Paris Is the title of toe latest work ot the successful humorist, George Ade, for stkgeland, and Henry W, Savage is to make the production In toe early autumn. "Peggy from Paris is American from start to finish, - . E D. Price, formerly manager of Richard Mansfield, will continue next season as general manager of William A. Brady's productions of "Lovers Lane. The piece will be presented by three distinct organizations, as heretofore. ( William A. Brady Is holdlfig time for Grace George In January at a Broadway theatre, Manhattan. Miss Georges road tour will begin early In November, but she 1 not to be seen In the metropolis until after the Christmas holidays. , "Foxy Grandpa will be presented! by two companies next season, one of tofse, beaded by Joseph Hart afid Carrie De Mar, being Identical with that which achieved so notable a success at, the Fourteenth gtreet Theatre, Manhattan. Alexander Vincent has been engaged for Captain Molly at the Manhattan Theatre. Mr. Vincent is remembered for his effective work as a comedian In "Hon. John Grigsby' last season, he having appeared as toe veteran with a wooden leg In that play. , , 1 Martin Harvey will produce In Dublin, Ireland, hr September, "The Children of Kings, with Humperdlacks music, which will be seen later in the fall in New York. Mr. 'Harvey and his company will sail for this country early in October to begin his American tour. , Among the small coterie of actors who have been presenting Shakespeare and olasslo drama during recent years no one has been more faithful or consistent than Charles B. Hanford. Out of the twenty year that he has been on toe stage eighteen have been devoted to this line. ,1- . Rices "Show Girl,, which comes to this city during the fall, le a revival of R. A. Barnet's latest "Cadet extravaganza, transformed into a regular attraction by the veteran producer, Edward B. Rice. It is described as a Jolly bit of tomfoolery In two acts and five scenes. , 4 - , 'The scene models and costume plates for toe new production of "Robin Hood were submitted to Messrs. Jlamabee & MacDonald yesterday, and orders were given to proceed with the contracts with all toe haste possible. It la Intended that the revival shall considerably outvie the original production. The old but ever fascinating melodies of Aubers delightful operetta, "Fra Dlavolo, a work which has made the name of many a singer, will be revived during this week by the Terrace Garden Opera Company at Managers Suessklnd and Rehfeldts sylvan glade on East Fifty-eighth street, Manhattan. , Plxley and Luders latest musical comedy, The Prince of PUsen, has made a big success. If the newspapers of 'Boston are to be relied upon. It was produced at toe Tremont Theatre In that city nine weeks ago, and despite the fact that the weather has at times been very trying, the theatre has been crowded all the time. Mrs, Bpoofier will make up a theatre party to Brighton Beaoh this week of the members of her company who are in Brooklyn. The party will go to Brighton Beach on to6 coach which Mrs Spooner has Just purchased for UBe In her forthcoming production of "My Lady Peggy, and will occupy a box as. tos guests of Manager Grower. Among the engagements for lira Flskes company for Paul Heyses drama, "Mary of Magdala, that of Rose Ey-tlnge Is announced. This distinguished i actress has appeared on the stage bui Infrequently in recent years, and her return in this notable production at the Mmhattan Theatre will put her forward, U is said, in a role for which she la admirably fitted.' 1 James Young has written Grace STUDYING, THE WHEEL PROBLEM - OF THE GREAT George offering her his collection of theatrical 'bgoks and pictures, including the largest number of portrait of Edwin Booth in existence outside ot the Players Club. Mr. Young has ceased collecting' and feels that he would like to add hts treasures to those of Miss George, who has a very fine assortment of t antiquities. The Professional Womens League yesterday sent out a circular letter ti the president of every organization the American Federation of Worm Clubs asking for co-operation in the forthcoming Woman's Exhibition ' at Madison Square Garden. This letter Is expected to prove valuable In bringing contributions to the loan collection In the art department at the exhibition, Francis Wilson and his company in "The Toreador" will begin rehearsals Aug., 18. Mr. Wilson will return from Europe the third week In August His present tour abroad, which began early In May, will be the most extended he has ever made. He landed at Gibraltar the latter part of May, and after a trip through Spain began an Itinerary which Included the large cities of France, Germany and Russia. , . i , 1 - ' s The poster design drawn by Emma Shields for the ''forthcoming Women's Exhibition, and now being lithographed by tlm Strobrldge Company, Is to be hung (it toe salon of the Association of American Artists. The design ta conceded I to be one of the handsomest things of the sort that the year has brought forth In New York, and there Is little doubt that it will secure at least honorable mentlom Frank B. Hatch, general stage director fqr William A. Brady, has been en- ged to put on that portion of the Woman's Exhibition to be known as the Street of All Nations. This street will Include twenty-two booths, and will be populated by over two hundred women, so that Mr, Hatch la likely to have an opportunity of using all the skill and tact which he showed Jn toe production of the all-star UocleToms Cabin," last year. s 4 - Klaw ft Erlanger began the rehearsals ot ths Rogers brothers and their company In John J. McNallys newest vaudeville farce, "The Rogers Brothers In Harvard, under the direction of Ben Teal, on the stage of the Knickerbocker Theatre, Manhattan, yesterday morning. The Rogers Brothers will open their season Aug. 25 with a preliminary week at the Star Theatre In Buffalo, coming to the Knickerbocker Theatre for a run Sept. L i , . v Joseph Cawthorn, who played the nurse In "The Sleeping Beauty and the. Beast, during the run of that play here, has signed a seven years' contract with Messrs. Klaw ft Erlanger. This coming season he will Continue In the role of the nurse In "The Sleeping Beauty and the Beast Commencing with the season of 1904-!, Messrs. Klaw ft Erlanger will place Mr. Cawthorn at the head of his own company under a five years' starring contract - Klaw Adrian ger are pushing the work of toe construction of their -new theatre, toe New Amsterdam, on Forty-second street, Manhattan, with great energy. The excavation for the foundations is being Cut in solid rock. Eighteen steam drills, 150 men and twenty teams removing the stone as it Is dug out, are at work night and day. The foundations will be sunk In rock forty feet below, and ' the building will tower 198 feet above the sidewalk line. 4 , , The play in which Sarah Cowell Le Movne is to star next season Is being finished by Glen cDonough, who announces that it will be entitled -Among Those Present." It is added that the piece is a etory of contemporary life, jars. Le Moyne's tour will not begin un til rather later than usual, Mr MaDon ough having Commenced work on hit scenario a very short time ago. Among Those Present will have its Initial presentation on ths rad and afterward probablywiu be brought Into New York. The rehearsals of "Ths Liberty Belle will begin Aug- 4. Katie Rooney will play toe part of Margery Lee, and Violet Dale the character of Dorothy Grey, the belles," Katie Rooney Is a daughter of the late Pat Rooney, the famous Irish comedian, and Is by talent and experience well fitted to play ye stage-struck girl. Miss Dale has been a prominent figure In vaudeville and musical comedy for several years, both In this country and In England. She Is 20 years of sge, snd ha been on 'tbs stage fourteen years. Nixon ft Zimmerman have engaged Melville Ellis, William Blalsdell, Will-Igm Broderick, Joe Coyne, Robert Evans, James Ratliff, George H. Haynes, Joseph Fay, William Pullman, Christie MacDonald, Clara Jerome, Miriam Lawrence and Nora Cecil to -play the principal roles in support of Francis Wilson in The Toreador, who will begin his second season In this musical comedy at the Chestnut street Theatre, in Philadelphia, Sept. 28. 'he company will number eighty people, fifty ot them reqmrkably beautiful young women. , The Misses Spooner will -leave tola week for a short visit to Scranton, Penn., where they will be with friends. During their absence they will take riding lessons, MIbs Cedi having to be an accomplished horsewoman In her new play, My Lady Peggy. -- Both toe Misses Spooney have been learning the art ot fendng Since the closing of the ' theatre, and Mr. Phillips also has taken It up ftlnce his return. All are now-qulte export with ths foils. Thera are Several duels in MisS Mathews' play, in which Mlsb Cedi will star. t'The Rice AmuBtment Company, owners of all the productions and plays brought out during the past feyr years by the veteran, yet versatile, Edward E. Rice, are negotiating for an elaborate production of Rices "Evangeline In London in the fall. In this presentation Miss Katheryn Hutchinson, the young soprano, who sprang from the chorus Into the prims donna role In a single night during the run of "The Show Girl In Manhattan, will be the Evangeline, and it Is expected' that several of the Original cast ot ten years ago will 1 be seoured, notably Henry E, Dlxey, Riche ard Golden, George ITortesque and Amelia Summerville. s ( Henry W. Savage announces the cast for George Ades satire, The Sultan of Sulu, as follows: Kf Ram, the Sultan, Frank Moulin; his secretary, Frederick Frearj Lieut. Hardy, U. 8. A., Templar Saxe; Col. Budd, U. S. V., Robert Lett, Henrietta Budd, his daughter, Maud Lillian Berrl; Palmela Jackson, Judge Advocate, Blanche Chapman; Chiqutta, the S' rv HERE A KING HELD COURT. MONO the sights of London town is famoqF Crosby Hall, in Btshops-gatq street, where at one time Richard IIL resided and held court. It is presented because it Is one of -the few structures boasting an an- tlqulty of four centuries or more. Many of the oldest and most famous houses In England have been pulled doan In toe march of improvement, one of toe last to go under the hammer blnpr Hogarths house In Chiswick, where the great painter lived. MOVING PLATFORM SCHEME. favorite wife of the Sultan, Gertrude Quinlan; Wakeful! Jonee, an American commercial traveler with the expedition, Charles Gtblyn; Dldymua and Ras-tus, slaves of the Sultan, William Brown and James Fowarty. "The Sultan of llu Is to come on Broadway, Manhat-n, for - an extended run during toe course of the present season, . The first event of tho Metropolitan season will be a Woman's Exhibition, given linder the auspices of, the Professional Womans League, In October, at Madison Square Garden. This show, In which 8250,000 will be invested, and some 8,000 ot tbe gentler Sex employed. Is to be a great tale of goods made and used by women. In addition, there will be an oval populated y- the femininity of all nations, a reproduction Of a street In Venice an art gallery, a museum, lecture hall and a gymnasium. Women will serve as Carriage attendants, doorkeepers, ticket sellers, police officers and programme carriers. An orchestra and two brasa bands of wofnen have been engaged to furnish music. s-r , Next Saturday, July 28, promises to be a real red letter day at Manhattan Beach. The members of the Twenty-third Regiment will be ths guests on that day of the Beach management, and Henry Pain, of flreworka fame. The regiment will be taken to the beach In epecial trains over toe Long Island Railroad, and will attend the matinee performance of Primrose and Dockstader Minstrels, after which they will give a dress parade and drill on the big lawn lying between the Oriental and Manhattan Beach Hotels. They will have supper In the flreworke pavilion, and will later attend toe fireworks exhibition as the guests of Mr- Pain. The officers will dine at the Oriental Hotel, and the start homewardwlll bi made at 10 oclock. Blanche Walsh, in a recent interview, recalls a coincidence which in her opinion augury well for the new play which Stanislaus Stange is now writing for her, and, which Is founded upon FlaubertS novel, "Salammbo. Miss Walsh says that her first, public appearance was made thirteen years ago when she was a mere girl of fifteen, at an amateur performance of "Othello" at the old Windsor Theatre," ht the Bowery-New York. She was the Desdemona, and the gentleman who played Iago was this same Stanislaus Stange, the author of the new play she is to appear In next season. The coincidence lies In the fact that Mr. Stange accepted the commission to write a play on the subject of "Salammbo for Messrs. Wagen-hals ft Kempet long before these managers had any idea of making a contract to star Miss Walsh. - . Onoto Watanna, author of "A Japanese Nightingale," the dramatio rights to which have been secured by Klaw ft Er langer, was born In Nagaskl, - Japan, twenty-three years ago. She Is- perhaps, the youngest successful novelist In the world, her third book having Just been purchased prior to its writing by the Harpers. Miss Watanna Is of Anglo-Japanese origin. Her father was an English Consul who married a Japanese woman. Thp marriage was not, however, of that variety which furnishes the main motive iix "A Japanese Nightingale,, for while Jack Bigelow married Yuki In Japanese fashion, Miss Watan-nas father married hi wife after toe Christian ceremony. Klaw ft Erlanger will produce "A Japanese Nightingale most elaborately, and will mount It with a magnificence which will riSal even toe sumptuousness of "Ben-Hur." 5- - The question has often been' asked, Why does not Henry W. Savage send the Castle Square Opera Company Into more cities duripg toe oourse of a season? Musio lovers everywhere ask that question, and the home office of the organization Is besieged with letters on the subject. The question Is easily answered, for the reason Is simply that It Is not possl ble to move that organisation about as ordinary companies are moved and have anything left In the treasury at the end ot the season. The organization Is a very large one, eomethlng over 125 people, and there are from seven to ten carloads of scenery and baggage carried with the company. So It is that tbe organization plays a season of forty weeks, but In that time visits but nine or ten of the larger cltlee. The Castle Square Opera Company Is known by all musio lovers to be the best organization that has ever given the grand and standard operas m the English language. It has been In existence for seven years, and Is the only organization of the kind that has even given perfect satisfaction, for while toe standard of work and the personnel of the company Is very high, the .price of admission Is very moderate. This season Puccini's "La Tosca has been added to the repertory- and Is to bs presented during each engagement played by the company. SALMON FISHING. Lots of Fun and Fish For Very t Little Money. How a Canadian Editor Gathers h& y - I Them In From the Restigouche, . and Its Tributaries.' r t Editor Young of the Cornwall (Ont.) freeholder"1 has Jusf been having sport with. the salmon of the upper New Brunswick waters, and, thus describes a few days In the Restlgouche country: ' v How much ddie It cost to kill a salmon? 1 - Well, that depend If you are a member of the Restlgouche Club your bill may run up a thousand or more, but ordinary mortals can do It for a good deal less, I dropped off at Campbellton, N. B,on a mid-June-morning, and looked up Billy Sproul, ot the Royal Hotel, and got a pointer or two. At 8 o'clock I took an accommodation train1 1 few miles west to Flat Lands, hailed a 'atherly old fellow, William Delaney, caretaker ot the Montgomery and Suction Water, and stated the case. William had a canoe, but no other man wae presently available, so we two went out alone. -The water was practically free, a nominal rental of 81 a day being charged per rod. There was perhaps half a mile of It altogether, and the Restlgouche River being unusually high, no pools were In sight.. We pulled out a few yards from shore, and dropping a stone for an anchor, oast to right and left, choosing a Durham-ranger fly of rather large pattern. The second or third cast brought a nice fellow to the top, a little short, however, and a few minutes later another, short, likewise. "Black salmon, said William, and ho good anyway These kelts or black salmon are fish that have wintered In tbe river, and are lean, lanky fellows, not fit for food, but liable to give you ka good a run as any other. Our first victims may or may not have been kelts; the guides are good-natured fellows as a rule, and sympathetic, and William may have been letting me down easy. - , Ths stone Is pulled up, and we drop down a few yards further, and after a while, with a moderately- short cast, a good-sized fish takes the fly, turns over, and then trouble begins. ' Right out into the river he goes, the reel screaming with delight, one could almost Imagine then an eruption In the water, and three or four feet of glittering silver Is In the air for a second or two. Another run and then a sulk at the bottom, with a stetujy chug, obug, as If the fish .was trying to get rid of the hook that was interfering with his freedom of motion. 1 "Keep the strain on him, salcf 'WllI-iam, and look out when he goes again. A tew minutes of suspense, then another rush and another Jump, and away he races up the centre of the river. A Metapedla salmon bound for the clubhouse for sure. But towing a canoe was a pretty heavy drag, and soon there were signs of distress. Tbe fish led somewhat more easily, he was reeled up, and ran out several times, each rush a little leas vigorous. All the time the canoe was being worked nearer ehore, till at last I was able to get out on the gravel. Fifty feet out the fish was lying almost exhausted on the top of the water and was coaxed In till a stroke of the gaff Impaled him and he was kicking himself on the gravel, when a blow from a stick straightened him out. A Meta-pedia salmon he was, deep and chunky, only a day or two from salt water, bright and shining, and on the scale a few hours later weighed 22 pounds. f They were not specially keen In the afternoon, one or two short rises, a run for a few minutes and a lost fish, and Jnst as we were preparing to suspend operations a good stiff strike. This fish did not Jump, but sulked for perhaps half a hour, then a wild rush or two. In vain we tried to guide him to a snug harbor, he would make for the south shore where there was no chance to land. A rather stiff rapid Intervened, and In the trouble of navigating It with one man, the fish said good-lye, taking with him the ily and half the leader It was nearly train time again, and reluctantly we wound up operation for the day. Going up on the train next morning I found tost two other parties had arranged to fish the Montgomery and Suction watei a, so Delaney and 1 betook BRIGHTON CEACri tHILDRRM AT BAILT MAriNEKS, TODAI AT 8 19. TO-N1U1II A McIntyre A: H path, Rnse Naynnn Hatty a Iordan ft WolRb Carter De Haven Trio. TO MOKROW AND A1 L Wl- H tewla ft Ryan, Delmore ft tee Kaufrimnn Claude IH&rdo, Paulina Moran suid Plcki MabelHudaon. SlafHr Brooklyn Martn rm ARION FE9TTVAL i In connection with the national mu sit literary contests arranged by the Arii n t Society to take place during the vw k of I flTtnff at the Forty seventh Regiment An SOUVENIR PROGRAM ME t Artistically executed will be published will be distributed at least 80 000 oople same the Souvenir Programme ma he hijr ommended as an advertising medium t bring the best results lor further infc. apply to the Programme Committee L BURGER. Chairman, 08 Meeerole st THE TURF. Brghfoti iKsccs mi " MUSIC BT LAN DEB. Reached by All Coney Island lit ourselves elsewhere, on the Water own. with fair success. One of the men had only a trout and a shaky one at that, a sea with worn-out mechanism, and that broke easily between the fingCi bad never seen a salmon In the i but with toe proverbial luck of a ti foot, hooked one early In the day being blessed, with two good guide mao Indians humored and riurset for an hour and a quarter, never t to trust toe line, but allowing the i have hie own way until he was p cally dead and offered-no resistan the gaff. . Forty pounds and a-, over, the scales said, and the reeor of the season. ,A heavy wind prevented castin third day, end there being no stg any let up after dinner, the two Ii whom I had engaged ran down tot to get a few trout. It was betwei seasons, yet by dint of hard fishii got a dozen or so, several of four p or over. At times toe river IS alivi trout of large size. The smells cqi from the eea In Immense shoals an trout follow them, afterward going up the river to toe spawning grour toe headwaters, Now for figures. There were days good fishing. Leaving the r-transportation out of the questioi account stood thus. ! Hotel, three days 4 One man two days and two men one day Incidentals X Total n-. a For tackle, one can please himsei good strong salmon rod can be boug 810 to 815, mine Is 15 feet long, a Scr Of St. John, N. B., that cost 81S. have had it sixteen years, used It t kinds of fishing, and It Is still good life time. A good salmon reel costs 83 up, mine cost 84, It has a cltcl does not multiply, has also been use teen years. A good waterproof stl' costs 8 for 100 yards, but this y used an Abbey and IftibfIe"Np-s5 linen braid, cost 81.10 per 100 yai, little light, perhaps, but an-werin purpose. In flies, one can be as exi ! gant as he pleases there Is some wonderfully tempting in a tackle s but as good as we need can be got b city for 25 cents each Forrests cents are prettier and neater, but m ter. You must have four kinds, way, Durham-ranger, sliver-doctor, Scott and black-dose, and can add thing else you like fairy and silver-will not come amiss. You want I sizes, I prefer double hooks for smaller sizes, but that is a matte1 taste. Leaders cost from 25 cents to J I have used good cheap ones and dear ones 75 cents Is a fair price should test 7 to 9 pounds dry. 1 guides will likely have a gaff, but Juet as well to own one In case of dent, 'a large gaff is necessaty, wi-spread of 6 or 8 inches Practically all the salmon fisliin, Canada Is Teached by the Interool Railway. The Restlgouche, with tributaries the Metapedia, Causa; and Upsalqultch, are the nearest to & treal. The I. C. R. follows the Metar for almost fifty miles, to w here It em Into- the Restlgouche at Metapedla tton, eight miles above tidewater, 5 Caueapscal Joins the Metapedia thl five miles above Metapedia Station. I Caueapscal Is owned entirely by" the I tigouche Club, who also control mot, the Metapedia, and a good deal of Restlgouche. The Upsalqultch has been reserved the New Brunswick Government, an leased at 82 per day per rod There Igreat deal of good water and a doze more fishermen would not be In others way. Fishing In the Restlgm and Metapedla Is good from May t 'August, the Upsalqultch is at Its bes July. The salmon In each river are tlrely distinct and can be told a glance by the guides; those In the Up quitch are a trifle smaller than the era. Campbellton, N. B , at the mout' the river, Is the only considerable t In the Restlgouche country, and 1 good place for headquarters. The R aforesaid, Is a good friendly place to cheap withal, and Billy Bproul Is prophet good sportsman, with an II mate knowledge of all the water, ctdedly a good man to write to. agent of the I. C. R at Flat Lands, -also answer any questions addressed him. Good board may be had at 1 Lands and at farmhouses In the ne borhood. . In the early season. May and up middle of June, there le considerable 9 watei1 that le also entirely free for mon fishing from the lower limits of Restlgouche Club, a mile below the M pedia bridge, to tidewater say se miles in all there Is no restriction catching trout anywhere you are HI to get them. During my three days s this year some thirty salmon many 0 30 pounds each were killed In the we I have mentioned. Good stretches water can be had bdlow Metapedia ai to 82 per day, and still better water the Metapedla and Restlgouche up to a day. Alexander Mowat, Campbell! N. B , has several excellent strete very accessible, good all through the s son, at varying prices. W, A Mott, P. P Campbellton, N. B , president the Bay Chaleur Tourists Assoc iat can be consulted about the Upsalqul THE REDEMPTION OF - SPOILED POSTAL CARL Beginning Aug. 1 all spoiled pos cards which have not been canceled be redeemed at the Brooklyn Post of at a rate of 75 per cent of the orlg value. The privilege will be restrU to the refund being In postage star and to the original purchaser AH po cards which have been subjected to bronzing or enameling process will 1 be redeemed. It Is Inferred that t will put a number of Jobbers In po cards which have been printed on back and which have been bou ht a discount, totally out of business. t

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