The Standard Union from Brooklyn, New York on February 1, 1896 · 7
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The Standard Union from Brooklyn, New York · 7

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Saturday, February 1, 1896
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THE DAILY STANDARD UNION: BROOKLYN. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1800.- -TWELVE PAGES. Tiie World's Providers CTITEINTH CENTUBT LIBRABY 8TTIT. eoverAd In leather. eonsiaMne of I Sni. I Divan. 1 Arm Chair. 1 Kortar; fhe backs tufted. earTad Irtonu. oxidized 0 j lift ' ' f..tt n tirmtlw mi; Mtl . ........ DwtliL - - I QTARTEBW Oak Hall Kettle. apn-iwork bank, mirror to .xccamrtany of quartered oak. anml-TaI xbaoa aad bat rask. Ki.. .If,.!!., ftnl. h..l iXTIQCE Oak jdrawera, eonipart-knent blow: helcbf IS 10 In..-width 3 (feat i dptn 1 ln-t fl inches; one 10 00 drawer lined IJiOJ bench S feet 4x1 too? : c I a a a iSrS3 25.19 cnTIEVTH CEHTTJBT Card Table of masnineentiy srfiliahedOak. aad tw Arm Chairs oraamentatlr made: eom- II OC sreaulQla la to one piaoa of furniture. lriiU America's Greatest iLDDWIGBADMANB&COMPANY BLOCK. 33th to 36th St. and 8th Ave., New York. .THE WORLD'S HOME PROVIDERS? CUT-CF TOWH BUYERS 6IYEH CARFARE. COUNTRY TRADI RECEIVE) SPECIAL AITENTIOX. GOODS PACKED CAR IFULLY AND SEN r EVERT WHERE. FREIGHT PAID. ? OPEN SATURDAY EVENING TILL 10 O'CLOCK. CQRPORATrOI NOTICES. DfcHARTMBNT OF COLLECTION. ROOMS t, 4. , 1 and 10, Municipal Bu..i.nc. Brooklyn, December 28,- 1H9S Nottc Is hereby stven that' tb Uawaaunnt roll In th following entitled matters hv bm complsied, and the warrants for th eolircUon of th various UHeannenti mentioned thrla have this day bn delivered to the Collector of Tiw and Assessments, and all persona liabka t pay such assessments are required to pay the same without deiay at bis office, under the penalty of the U. RKPAVINO. . Fenn street from Lee avenue to Bedford avenue. Uacon street from Nostrand avenue to Marcy aeoue. Extracts from the law. Chapter BS3, Laws of lf$S, Title 7, Hection 10, and Title 1. Section , as amended by Chapter oW, Laws of 18y2, and Chapter Ox. Uwi of ISfti: On all taxes and oa all asveftsments which shall hereafter be paid to the electors before the expiration of 30 days) from the time the same shall become due and payuble. an allowance shall be made to the person or persons rwuklna: such payments at the rate of seven and three-tenths per centum per annum for the unexpired portion thereof. On all taxes, as ac-ftsmcnts and water rales paid after the explra tion of 30 days from the time the same shall have, become due and payable, there shall be added to and collected as part of every such tax, assessment or water rate, interest at the rate of nine per cent, per annum, to be computed from the time the same became duet and payable to the data of said paynent. R. ROSS A PPLETON. l-Jf-3ot Collector of Taxes and Assessments. TP K COMMON COUNCIL OK THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, vis. : That It Is ncesnary to cause the lots fronting upon south side of Chuncey street between Lewis and Stuyveftint avenue, known as lots Xos. SO and 51. Block 122, Twenty-third Ward Map. to be fenced with a close board fence where not already done, to the height of six feet, for the pur pose of abating a nuisance, of which the present roT.dltlon of the said lots Is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lots be to fei.ced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, snd the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for do-lnpr such work. The foregoing: decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 2d day of December, 106. 1-30-101 JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. THB COMMON" COT-NCTL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and 'laln as fol'ows, viz: That It s necessary to cau.e the lot frmtlnjr uron north side of Broome street, between Graham vfnue and Humboldt street, known as lot No. 1. Block 22S, Seventeenth Ward Map, to be fenced with a cloe board fence, where not already done, to the height of six 6) feet, for the purttowe of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lot Is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lot be so f nred at the expenne of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise Tor proposals for do-Inr such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council bv a two-: thirds vote this ?d dav of Decemrwr. 18!3. l-30-10t JOriEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. TfTB COMMON" COUNCIL OF THTC CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as fallows, viz: That It Is necessary to cause the lota fronting upon east side of Knickerbocker avenue, between Stockholm street and DeKalb avenue, known as lota Nos. 10. 11, 12. 13. 14. 15. Block 88. Twenty-iwventh Ward Map, to be fenced with a clone board fence, where not already done, to the height of six f) feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lots Is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works Is hereby directed to advertise for proposals Tor doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 21 day of December, l!3. J-30-10t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. CUy Clerk. THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, viz.: That it u n eeary to cause the lots fronting upon north side of Van Voorhis street between Broadway snd Bushwlck avenue, known a. lots Nos. m and 70, Block 130, Twenty-eighth Ward Map, to be fenced with a c'.oe board fence where not already done, to the height of six feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lots Is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner ,or owner thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were dot. ted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this Id day of December 1895. 1-40-liH JOSEPH BENJAMIN, City Clerk. DEPARTMENT OF COLLECTION. ROOMS 2 4 . S and 10. Municipal Building. Brooklyn, January 31. I-. Notice Is hereby given that the Assessment Rolls In the following entitled matters have been completed, and the warrants for the collection of the various assessments mentioned thei-etn. have this day been delivered to the Collector of Taxes and Assessments, and all persons liable to pay such assessments are required to pay the some without delay at his office, under the penalty of the law. SEWER, Map N. District -". Forty-fifth street, between Fifth and Sixth avenue; also sixth avenue, between Forty-fifth and Forty-fourth streets. Map N. District 29, Fifty-seventh street, between Fifth snd Sixth avenues, and Hixth avenue, berwcn Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh sireets. Map O, District 37, DrigKs avenue, between Diamond street and Newell street. Map N. District 29, Sixth street, between Eighth and Ninth avenues. Extmcts from the Law, Chnpter 5S3. Laws of ' 1&S. Title 7, Section 10 and Title 19. Section , s amended by Chap. 6W. Laws of 12, and Chap. Laws of !&!.. On all taxes and on all assessments, whl-h shall hereafter be paid to the Collator, before the expltation of 30 days from the time the same shall be come due and payable, an allowance shall be made to the person or persons making such payments at the rate of seven and three-tenths per centum per annum, for the unexpired portion thereof. On all taxes, assessments and" wafer rare paid after the expiration i.f 1 days from th time the !ame snail have be-.--ne due and pny:Ht there nhall be added to and i w?d as part of cwry such tax, assessment or .ater r-.T-. interest et the rue of nine pr cent. , rr annurri. n b cni;-u'(-d frem the t me the me due- and pa;.i;e. to the drtte of ctor cf ' l-31-MJt IT baa Ion? r,een conceded that n bar Onar earrlaffee, mora variety In design and cheapest ever aeon: sand for babr earriaara ear- 1:.2.50 RLACK WALNUT " Child's Cradle, "Anid Lan Syne. B -ad vnd foot t or-Bamental eoroll-saw w.-rr. own worked Ida panels. Uia 7C latest craze , if 3 CAMrLT Rocker of quartered oak, with eobbler seat of leather eirtoed. Chair farrad. Q 7! "Its any cm- Oil ANTIQUE Oak or 1 Matioa-anr flalab Hookers, covered la tOflDItl I'aDee-ry.rood "ina..-. Cash or Credit House. K3 OEY REQUIRED ON DEPOSIT. $SO WORTH.. ..78o, PER WEEK . 75 WOHrH...I.BH PER WEEK ' SlOO WORTH. .SX.O0 PSR WEEK SEND lOe. POSTAGE FOR ILLUS TRATED CATALOGUE. CORPORATION NOTICES. THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, viz: That It Is necessary to cause the lots fronting upon north side of Palmetto street, known as lots Nos. 32 A. 33. 34 and 34 A. Block 60, Twenty-eighth Ward Map, to be fenced with a dose board fence, where not already done, to the height of six (6) feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which, the- present condition of the said lots Is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 2d day of December, 1895. l-30-10t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. THIS COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, vis: That it Is necessary to cause the lots fronting upon north side of Cornelia street, between Central avenue and Evergreen avenue, known as lots Nos. 40. 41, 42, Block 164. Twenty-eighth Ward Map, to be fenced with a close board fence, where not already done, to the height of six fi) feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lots is Che cause. And they hereby ordain that said lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such worK. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 2d day of December, 1895. l-30-10t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, vis: That It Is necessary to cause the lots fronting upon north side of Lexington avenue, between Broadway and Patchen avenue, known as lota Nos. 101 to 109. Block 27. Twenty-fifth Ward Map, to be fenced with a close board fence, where not already done, to the height of six () feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lots Is the cause. And they hereby ordain that sa-id lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work; The foregoing, decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 3d day of December, 1S95. l-30-10t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, vis: That it Is necessary to cause the lots fronting upon north side of Gates avenue, known as lots Nos. 33. 36. 39 and 42. Block 49. Twenty-eighth Ward Map, to be fenced with a close board fence, where not already done, to the height of six (6) feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lots is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 2d day of December, 1815. 1-S0-I0t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, vis: That it Is necessary to cause the lots fronting u-mhi south side of Palmetto street, known as lots Nos. 17. 18. 19, 20. 31, 23 and 24, Block 61. Twenty-eighth Ward Map, to be fenced with a close board fence, where not already done, to the height of six 6) feet, for the purpose of abating a nulsanoe, of which the present condition cf the said lots is the cause. . And they hereby ordain that said lotg be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works Is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 2d day of December. 1S95. X-30-l0t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, viz.: That lit Is necessary to cause the lots fronting upon east side of Klngsland : avenue between Drifzgs avenue and Meeker avenue, known as lots Nos. 9. 10, It and 36, Block 235, Seventeenth Ward Mf.p, to be fenced with a close board fence where not already done, to the height of six (6) feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lots Is the cause. Arid they hereby ordain that said lots be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works ia hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were adopted by the said Common Council by a two-tl.irds vote this 2d day of December, 1895. 1-30-10t JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk, THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF Brooklyn do decide and ordain as follows, viz.: That it is necessary to cause the lots front ng Uon west side of Irving avenue between Bleecker street and Ralph .street, known as lot No. 9, Block 76. Twenty-eighth Ward Map. to be fenced with a close board fence where not already done, to the height of six 6) feet, for the purpose of abating a nuisance, of which the present condition of the said lot is the cause. And they hereby ordain that said lot be so fenced at the expense of the owner or owners thereof, and the Department of City Works is hereby directed to advertise for proposals for doing such work. The foregoing decision and ordinance were ad' pted bv the said Common Council by a two-thirds vote this 2d day of December, 1895. 1-30-MH JOSEPH BENJAMIN. City Clerk. CRROGATB8 TfOTICES. IN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER MADE BY the Honorable William B. Hurd, Jr., one of the County Judges of Kings County, on the 31st day of January, 1M, notice Is hereby given to all the creditors and persons having claims against William J. Tate, lately doing business In the city of Brooklyn. In the county of Kings, that they are required to present their clairrM, with the vouchers therefor duly verified, to the subscriber, the duly appointed assignee of the said William J.' Tiite. f-r the benilt of his creditors, at hia place of transact uig business. No. 213 Montague street, in said cirv Brooklyn, on or hfor the first day of M.i l. Dati January 21, .J. f NOAH TKHBHTT fAssirnee. A- C. AT" T-.-1., Atty. for Assignee, 93 Nss- sau strr f ;tw iarft, i -i-M IS.- p8 m wm-M Congress Making Good Progress on Some Big Bills. TlOSE ON APPROPRIATIONS FARTHER ADVANCED THAN EVER BEFORE AT THE OPENING OF FEBRUARY THOSE ON AGRICULTURE AND THE NAVT TO BE TAKEN UP NEXT WEEK MUCH MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS REQUIRING ATTENTION. . (Special to Tba Standard Union.) Washington, D. C, Feb. 1. Congressional matters are becoming so shaped that the early adjournment which the Republicans think desirable, appears more probable. Che passage of the Free Silver bill by the Senate to-day will make way for other legislation. This will practically end the financial legislation for this session, except wherein some provision for emergency notes to cover Treasury deficiencies may be made In an appropriation MIL The urgent Deficiency bill has already been reported to the Senate, and will . probably be disposed of on Monday. The Senate Committee on Appropriations has almost finished with the pension, military academy and diplomatic aad consular bills, which the House has already passed. These appropriation bills will be reported to the Senate by Tuesday, and it Is the expectation of Senator Allison, chairman of the Appropriation Committee, that they can be disposed of by the coming week. It is the purpose of the Senate to hurry the appropriation bills through as fast as they come from the House. The Agricultural bill and the Army bill have already been reported to the House, and will be taken up during the coming week. The Committee on Naval Affairs has almost completed that measure, and will report it early in the week. Never before have the appropriation bills been as far advanced with the opening of February, and seldom even in the short session of Congress, has so much work been accomplished with the appropriation bills, certainly not in recent years. The Tariff bill will be, In all probability, reported favorably from the Finance Committee on Tuesday, and be brought before the Senate immediately. It should not require more than a month for its consideration, though It will have to give way from time to time to the appropriation bills. There is a considerable amount of miscellaneous business which both Houses will have to attend to, but this can be disposed of quickly. It is thus apparent how well-founded is the hopes for an early adjournment. Yesterday's Treasury receipts amounted to (1,264,037.56; the expenditures were $642,830. This made the deficit for the day $621,207.56. As January is always a large importation month, merchants bringing goods for the spring trade, the receipts for the month, which ended yesterday, were $29,237,670.21. Of this, $16,-380,796.30 came from customs an increase of $4,200,000 over December, which is always a small importation month $11,-041,401.32 from internal revenue a decrease of $1,700,000 from December and of $1,815,472.59 from miscellaneous sources an increase of about $450,000 over December. ' The total expenditures for the month of January amounted to $32,696,830, an increase of $6,000,000, and four hundred odd thousand over -December, most of which came from the Interest account, which for December aggregated only $283,-858.56, and for January, $7,195,300. Civil and miscellaneous expenditures were $2,-600,000 greater, while those for the war, navy, Indians, and pensions, were several millions smaller. December last showed a forced surplus of $541,605.56, while Jan-nary closes with an immense deficit of $3,459,159.79. This makes the deficit for the first seven months of the fiscal year, $18,853,866.84, and for the thirty-five months of the Cleveland Administration, $130,756,346.65. and yet the President insists that no more revenue is required. The Treasury, however, has an immediately- available cash balance, exclusive of the gold reserve, fractional silver coin, fractional currency, minor coin and bonds and interest paid of $106,293,743.99. The Treasury gold reserve suffered a loss yesterday of $661,400, of which half a tnlllon was for export to South America. This reduces the gold reserve to a few thousand more than forty-nine million. Fortunately, the Treasury will soon commence to have the reserve replenished from receipts from the new bond issue. It is the policy of the leaders of the House to keep the appropriations down. Thin is always difficult when there Is a strong demand for liberal aproprlatlons. This is particularly the case at the present time when there is a concerted effort to secure appropriations for internal improvements that are projected or under way. A member of the Rivers and Harbors Committeee said to-day that he thought it, probable that the committee would consider liberal appropriations for such Improvements. He thought that it was false economy to permit improvements that had already began to become practically useless, because of a lack of funds to complete them. Whether Mr. Reed's opposition to such appropriations will be effective or not. Is a question. There will at least be a determinecffight to dtf something for the waterways, particularly those on which tangible results nave been accomplished. The substitute for the House Bond bill, which provides for the free coinage of silver, will pass the Senate to-day at 2 o'clock. Several motions looking to defeat it will be made prior to that time, and all be voted down. There Is some question as to what will be the majority for the bill. It will range from two to five. There are several men who favor silver who feel that It is undesirable to pass this bill, but they will be probably pushed into line. The anti-free silver men expect that Mc-Bride of Washington and Baker of Kansas will vote against the measures, while some bank on the opposition of Wilson of Washington. The free silver men threaten that in case there are any moderate silver men voting against the measure, they will have their revenge by endeavoring to impose a free silver amendment on the Tariff bill. This threat may deter those silver men who are not in love with this measure from voting against it. Its. passage is a foregone conclusion though, and should not cause apprehension, because that will be all that silver will get out of this Congress. - It is Impossible to state at this writing how soon a vote can be secured on the Dupont case. The favorable report; from the Committee on Privileges and Elections helps Dupont considerably. The written reports of the majority and the minority will be filed on Monday. An effort will be made to bring the case before the Senate by the close of the coming week. It will necessarily require considerable time for debate. Dupont will probably be seated, though the opposition of free silver men to added honest money strength may hurt bim. PALMER BEATEN AGAIN. Justice Osborne denied the application of Controller Palmer for a new trial in the action brov.ght against him by Robert Crummey, for back salary and reinstatement as clerk in the Controller's office. The action was tried before Justice Osborne, and the Jury returned a verdict in Mr. Crummey's favor. . A NEW FIRM OF LAWYERS. Two bright young lawyers, Delancey F. Nichols and B. F. Chadsey, have formed a Knew law firm, under the name of Nchols & Chadsey, and have taken offices in' the Of-mania Savings Bank Building. Each ov ie gentlemen is recognized as energet earned and skillful in the practice of Ihw, and their many friends predict ' - them a successful career in their n field. TISS3ER FELL ON HIM. REGAN GETS $5,000 FOR HIS . INJURIES. Jmes Regan obtained a verdict of $5,000 against the Brooklyn Heights Railroad Compny in the Supreme Court yesterday. Regan claimed that on Sept. 22, 1893. he was mixing mortar in the basement of the company's power house, on Kent avenue, which was then in process of construction. Whiie he was at work a heavy timber fell on his head and shoulders and Injured him severely The company claimed that It was not responsible. BECAME INSANE AND DIED. MRS. GOLDMAN WORRIED OVER HER HUSBAND'S TROUBLES. Hannah Goldman, the wife of Ellas Goldman, a Brownsville clothing contractor,' was buried yesterday from 23 That-ford street. ' Goldman was one of the contractors who had trouble a month ago with his employees. Mrs. Goldman worried over the matter until she became insane. On Jan. 27 rhe was taken to the Flatbush Insane Asylum, where she died on Thursday. CONSOLIDATION. Police Commissioner Parker Dis- cusses Important Problems. HE REVIEWS THE EFFORTS MADE PREVIOUSLY FOB, A GREATER NEW YORK THE DIFFICULTY OF FRAMING A PROPER CHARTER. Police Commissioner Andrew D. Parker of New York yesterday delivered an address on "The Greater New York" before the students of the Packard Business Col lege, at 101 East Twenty-third street. New York. A large number of visitors attended. ?'- Mr. Parker said the movement for the consolidation of New York and. her neighbors has advanced with a warlike movement, going forward ail . the time. The Idea first came up in 1833, when petitions for consolidation were made in New York and Brooklyn. The movement continued to grow strongeR and In 1857 the Metropolitan Police District was established by the Legislature. It Included New . York, Kings, Westchester and Richmond counties. But the New York City charter of 1870 abolished the Metropolitan Police, and again established the Municipal p Police, which remained in force until 1873, when the Police Department was created. Mr. Parker added: Now that the consolidation Is In sight, the great question comes as to the formation of a charter for the greater city. Within the municipal district there will be many elements. New York Is perhaps the most curious cosmopolitan city in the world. Brooklyn, on the other hand. Is more quiet and contained, more of a home city. It has been called the bedroom of New York. When one sees the life flowing to and fro on the Brooklyn Bridge every day, he Is inclined to agree with this definition. We would be surprised if we knew how many of our men of business and finance work In New York and live In Brooklyn. There are two very important questions to be settled. What kind of a council shall be given to the new city? The present Board of Aldermen has. little power. By degrees the body has been stripped of the powers originally vested in it, because of a distrust of it. Shall Its old powers be restored? Shall we have one house? Shall we have two houses, one elected by districts and one elected at large? Shall the members of one house be unpaid, and the office be made one of honor rather than of profit? The other great question Is one of taxation. .New York has its system, Brooklyn its system, and other districts their systems. How to reconcile the differences will require much anxious thoughts The common sense system would dictate that the same rate should be levied in every part of the great municipality, all sharing alike lh its expenses and Its blessings. Commissioner Parker's address received close attention from the young men, and was much enjoyed by them. EVANGELISTIC MEETINGS. THE REV. DR. DIXON TO SPEAK AT COOPER UNION. . The Rev. Dr. A. C. Dixon, pastor of the Hanson Place Baptist Church, will speak at the Evangelistic meetings to be held at the Cooper Union, New York City, next week. Following are the suo-jects on which Dr. Dixon will speak: Monday, "The Resurrectian of Jesus;" Tuesday, "The Bible;" Wednesday, "The God-Man' Thursday, "Ownership and Service;" Friday, "God's Acre of Diamonds." Sceptics are specially invited to attend Tuesday evenings meeting, and business men that, of Thursday evening. W. S. Weden and Miss Upham. will sing at these meetings. The congregational singing will be led by Mrs. Marlon Froe-lich, assisted by Miss Anna Park, cornet-lst. BERNARD EAR LE ILL. A WELL-KNOWN CATHOLIC LAYMAN DYING AT HICKS VILLE. . Hicksville, L. I., Feb. 1. Bernard Barle is lying dangerovly 111 at his home here. While out driving Thursday Mr. Earle took a sudden chill and it developed Into the grip. The physiscians do not think they can save his life. Mr. Earle la said to be a millionaire. He Is an ardent churchman, and recently gave 100 acres for a Catholic protectory here. He also deeded sixty acres at Round Swamp for a Trapplst monk farm. NEWS IN BRIEF. Three men were killed yesterday by the explosion of. a boiler In a stave mill at Freeport, Ohio. William B. Dayton was yesterday appointed Postmaster at Port Jefferson, L. I., by President Cleveland. W. Q. Judge," National Prss'.dsnt of the American Theosophical Society, with headquarters in New York City, is seriously ill at Fort Wayne, Ind. Louis Deitz, while temporarily insane last night, attempted to poison his s!x'-year-old son, then shot and seriously wounded his wife, and then killed himself at his home in Rahway, N. J. . At the sixty-sixth annual meeting of the Ale Brewers' Association irf New York City, yesterday. J. W. Brown, of this city, was elected president, and James M. Fuller, of this city, vice-president. The Louisiana Republican State Convention, which concluded Its work in New Orleans yesterday, . elected four delegates-at-large, to the Republican National Convention, who are pledged to support Thomas B. Reed for the nomination. George D. Todd, a straighout Republican, was elected Mayor of .Louisville, Ky., last night, by the CRjr'Council. defeating William E. Johnson, the Republican A. P. A. candidate. I A large sand-punplng dredge, owned by Woods & Schaefer, of New York City, and valued at $30,000 was sunk in Jamaica Bay, off Rockaway Beach, yesterday. Great destruction to life and property has been caused by a terrific tornado and flood in North Queensland. A large number of persons were drowned, many vessels are missing, and the loss to property is placed at $2,500,000. Colonial Secretary Chamberlain has ordered the British agent at Pretoria, the capital of the South African republic, to go to Johannesburg and report the true situation of affairs there to the Colonial Office. GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT. The February commencement of the Girls' High School will take place next Thursday evening at the school in Nos-trand avenue, corner of Halsey street. MUTUAL AID CONCERT. The Julius Kayser Mutual Aid Association gave a concert In Arion Hall last eveiing. A flna programme was ren-darsrl, after which a reception was held. A LITTLE STRIKE Italian. Stevedores Would Work 'With Irishmen. Not A SQUAD OF POLICEMEN WAS CALLED TO PREVENT BLOODSHED-AFTER FIVE HOURS THE STRIKERS CAME BACK. ; - There was a little strike yesterday at the Columbia Stores, at the foot of Atlantic avenue, which would certainly have become troublesome except for the prompt action of the police. The steamer Parkgate is one of the vessels employed in Hirtzel, Feltman & Co.'s Mediterranean service, . She came up to her pier on Thursday with a cargo of lemons and oranges from Italian ports. The news of her arrival spread among the Italians living In the Union street colony, and yesterday morning there were more than 100 of them upon the dock looking for work. The Italian 'longshoremen regard Italian fruit work as their exclusive right, and when they found that Thomas Monohan, the stevedore who handles a great deal of the foreign fruit which comes to this port, had employed a number of Irishmen, they were angry. A council of war was held, and then a demand for the dismissal of. the men was made upon Mr. Monahan. Mr. Monahan promptly refused. . This angered the Italians, who began to annoy the men who were working. Word of the trouble was carried to the Amity street station, and Sergeant McDonald, at the head of a squad of policemen, soon marched down the dock. The Italians grew quiet when they saw the bluecoats, but remained on the dock, scowling at their successful rivals. At 1 P. M., after the strike had lasted about five- hours, the strikers saw that Monahan was rapidly getting men for the work he,?had to do, and there was another consultation. The leaders finally approached the stevedore and said they had "made a mistake." The majority of them were put to work. A DOUBLE WEDDING. THE MISSES BALDWIN BECOME BRIDES TOGETHER. An interesting double wedding took place on Wednesday evening in the Hanson Place Methodist Episcopal Church. The brides were the Misses Martha M. and Mary Jane Baldwin, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Baldwin, of 24 Fort Greene place. The happy bridegrooms were Clarence Clark Fleming, of Cumberland street, and William Rodman Wilbur, of Sterling place. Both brides were attired in white satin, and both were attended by Miss Jeanie Fleming, Miss Laura Baldwin, of this city, and Miss Reid, of Quebec. The two best men were Joseph Fleming and Russell Wilbur, brothers of the bridegrooms. The Rev. Dr. Louis Albert Banks, pastor of the church, officiated at both ceremonies, and at the conclusion of which a reception at the home of both brides. Wednesday, Jan. 29, was the birthday of Mr. Baldwin, and both of his daughters decided to make that date their wedding day. Both young couples are spending the honeymoon in Quebec They will reside in this city. ARMENIAN RELIEF.' PROMINENT BRQOKLYNITES HAVE CALLED A MASS MEETING. A mass meeting will be held at the Academy of Music, Thursday evening, Feb. 6, to consider measures of relief for Armenia. Addresses will be made by the Rev. Dr. R. S. St'orrs, Rev. Dr. Theodore L. Cuyler, Rev. Dr. A J. F. Behrends, Gen. Stewart L. Woodford. Heranf M. Kiretchjian of Constantinople, Frederick Davis Greene, author of the "Armenian Crisis in Turkey," and Vastan Dilloyan. a survivor of the massacre of Sassoun. ' The call for the meeting has been signed by the Brooklyn Committee for Armenian Relief, composed of the Rev. Dr. Charles Cuthbert Hall, chairman; Gen. John B. Woodward, treasurer; Arthur B. Cook, secretary, and the Hon. Charles A. Schie-rerx. Gen. Stewart L. Woodford, James McKeen, William G. Low, Edwin Packard. John Notman, Rev. Dr. James H. Darlington and the Rev. Sylvester Ma-lone. Reserved seats may be secured gratuitously by persons who will pledge themselves to attend the meeting. NEW CANCELING MACHINE. THREE OF THEM ARE BEING SET UP IN THE POST OFFICE. In a. few days three cancelling machines will begin work in the General Post Office. They are now being set up by the manufacturer. The men who were assigned to this work of cancelling by hand, after the removal of the Dolphin machinery on orders from Washington, will go back to their regular work. It is expected that no one will lose his position, as substitutes took the places of the clerks assigned to the cancelling work. Five new places authorized by the Washington authorities Thursday will open the way for caring for the substitutes, all of whom are taken from the eligible list "HAD . TO SHOOT THE HORSE. RUNAWAY ACCIDENT IN FULTON STREET. A team of horses attached to . a carriage owned by William Mills, of 71 Wil-loughby street, while standing at Fulton street and Hopkins avenue Thursday night took fright and Tan along Fulton street. When In front of 1995 Fulton street the horses ran against an elevated railroad pillar. The harness snapped, and one of the dorses kept on for several blocks, when it wa stopped by a policeman. The other horse, coming in contact with the iron post, broke one of its legs, and yesterday morning was shot by . one of the officers of the Society for the Pre. vention of. Cruelty to Animals. UNREST AT JOHANNESBURG. NO SIGNS OF BUSINESS RESUMP-- . TION APPARENT. London, Jan. 31. A dispatch to the Central News from Johannesburg, under the date of Jan. 28, says that everything there to unsettled, and that there are no signs of resumption of business. It is rumored that the Government is contemplating another coup, involving additional arrests of prominent men in Johannesburg. Gerr. Joubert, commander-in-chief of the Transvaal forces, rode through the streets of Johannesburg on the morning of Jan. 28, preceded by a mounted soldier, bearing the flag of the South African Republic. -J- . Mr. W. D. White, the advertising specialist, who is to be found at No. 221 West Bancroft street, Toledo, O., asserts that in his case dyspepsia was an inheritance. He obtained his first supply of Rlpana Tabules by remitting 50 cents to Lord, Owen & Co., the wholesale . druggists of Chicago, because he' . could not then find them in Toledo. Now the druggists there have them always have them. Mr. White asserts that he carries one of the little vials with him, and if he has that distressed feeling after a hearty meal, or a" headache, be ; t takes a Tabule. His wife also I uses them, and, writes, Mr.-White, ! . "If my boy f feels sick, he asks ! for one." B'pans Tabules are sold by druersists. or by mall If the price (SO cents a box) ts sent to The Ripens CVemloai Conapany. No. 10 Bpruco at.. New Tort. Sa:r.p.e vial. 10 cents. ( CHESS. SATURDAY, Feb. 1, 1896. Communications should bft - addressed "Chess Editor. Standard Cnlon, Brooklyn, N. Y." Solutions to problems must reach this office bjr Frtday.) PROBLEM NO. 222. Composed for The Standard Union by S. M. Joseph, New York. Black, pieces. mm , mm mm w mm bSsYZz mi '.11 'tiii ' White, 7 pieces. White to play and mate In three moves. SOLUTION TO PROBLEM NO. 22L The key move is: L B K Kt 4, the variations: Black. 1. P x B. P B 3 1. B X R 1. P X P 1. P B 5 li P X Kt 1. Kt X K P 1.KHB? X. Kt Q 3 White. S. Q K a. mate. 2. Kt x B P, mate. 2. Q X Kt, . mate. S. Q x P. mate. S. B Kt 2. mate. 2. R x B P. mate. 2. Kt x Kt. mate. 2. R x Q P. mate. Correct solutions to Problem-No. 221, by Walter Pulitzer, have been received from Dr. J. B. Elliott, Jos. Bradley, E. W. Eng-berg, Geo. F. Murray, Dr. R. B. Browne, P. F. Monzert. Dr. Elliott says: -"Walter Pulitzer always does welL His problem, No. 221, is quite charming." Dr. Browne speaks of it as "a very fine two-move problem." The following neat ending was reached at the Newark C. C. a while ago in a consultation game: ( Black, 12 pieces. Mi nn w m Mi W?M l 5t? W? White, 13 pieces. White to move, finished the game in excellent style. . 29. Kt R . ch! K R SO. Kt Kt . ch. .. Kt X Kt : i 31. Kt B 7, ch. B X Kt 32. P X Kt . B Kt 33. R x P. eh.' - B x R ' 34. R K R K Kt 33. R X B ' K B 36. R R 8, oh. K K 2 37. Q Kt 6, ch. K K S ' ' 38. P B S, mate. " GAME NO. 392. An interesting game from a match, in Australia: . RUT Mr. Wilson. White. 1. P K 4 2. Kt K B 3 3. B Kt S : 4. B R 4 5. Castlea 6. B Kt - ;7. R K .. . . a p q i - .i- S. Kt x P : 10. Kt Q B t 11. R P X Kt 12. B Kt S 13. B X Kt 14. Kt B C 15. Kt X Q P 16. R X B. ch. (b) 17. Q R 6, ch. 18. Q B 3. ch, 19. Kt X P 20. Kt X P Ch. 21. Q K' 4 ! 22. K R 23. Q Q S, ch. 24. Kt K 6. ch. -26. Kt Kt S 24. Q K 6, ch. (d) 37. Kt B 7, ch. 28. Q X B, ch. 28: Kt x R . 30. Qr-Q C ch. 31. Q x R P, ch. 32. Q R 7, ch. (e) , LOPEZ. Mr. Hodgson. Black. P K 4 . Q Kt B 3 P 3 R 3 ' Kt B 3 . P Q Kt 4 Kt X P . . P Q 4 . . Kt B 4- ' .' Kt K 2 Kt x B B K 3 Q B (a) B x B B B 4 Q Q 3 P X R - K B Q B 2 R B (C) K K Q a P. ch. K Q 3 B Q 3 K K 2 B X Kt K B 2 K Kt 3 R x Kt K Kt 2 K B 2 Resigns. NOTES FROM MELBOURNE "LEADER." a Black has played a bed defense, and most lose at least an Important Pawn: of course, he' cannot play Q Q 3 here on account of the reply, Kt x Kt P, etc (b Finely played: the commencement of a winning; combination. - (c Q x Q seema batter. (d) Q x B. ch.. is even better; as if. K Q X Q x P. ch.. wins in a few moves. (e) Wbite has played the whole of the same with great vigor giving- his opponent after the sacrifice at the sixteenth move. COMMENTS. The St. .Petersburg tournament ended Jan. 27. Emanuel Lasker won first prize, winning 11 1-2 games; 5 from Tschlgorin, 4 from Steinitz. 2 1-2 from Pillsbury. He tost 3 1-2 to Pillsbury, 2 to Stelnitz, 1 to Tschlgorin. William Steinitz won second prize, his score being 9 1-2 wins; 5 from Pillsbury, 2 1-2 .from Tschlgorin, 2 from Lasker. He lost 4 to . Lasker, 3 1-2 to Tschlgorin, 1 to Pillsbury. Harry - N. Pillsbury won third prize, with 8 wins; 3 1-2 from Tschlgorin, 3 1-2 from Lasker, 1 from Steinitz. - Following is a letter from a special correspondent of the New Orleans "Times-Democrat," which will be read by Brooklyn players with interest. It will be noticed that Pillsbury and Steinitz are probably on their way home now: "St. Petersburg, Jan. 19. Since writing to you last, your representative, Pillsbury, has lost three additional games, and with them practically all chances of winning the tournament. How it all came about nobody seems to know, and as your countryman would not give any explanation, and had no excuses' to offer, but quietly submitted to his repeated reverses, there are only rumors in the air, and rumor being a very unreliable source of news, I decided not to report all the thousand and one 'on dits.' - Pillsbury has changed greatly in general appearance of late. Those who have watched him more closely have found that his looks betray some sort of trouble beyond that resulting from his business fiasco with Steinitz. Ir seems to the close observer as though all energy had left him. and while much may- be attributed to his private troubles, there is no doubt whatever that- the climate has been affecting him in -no small degree. It is a thousand pities that after making such a brilliant start that gave to America the hope of another international triumph, fate should so turn against him. "When he arrived he became at once a prime favorite among those whose pleasure it was to come in contact with him, and though most of the local chess players thought at first that Tschlgorin would surely win the tourney, they soon got over their disappointment at the Russian's many defeats. .This change of feeling soon developed into a regular Pillsbury worship cultus. You cannot possibly form any idea of the widespread Interest that prevailed among the better class of people at the beginning of the contest. In proof of this I send you a tabulation of a story which the St. Petersburg "Zeitung." a Germany daily, saw fit to publish. The conversation quoted there might or might not have actually occurred, as the names appearing in the course of it are all assumed, but I have, during the progress of the tournament, attended S o'clock teas where similar discussions have taken place. In other words,, the chess tournament has been the event of the season and the one topic of conversation. "After giving the scene of the tea party, the 'Zeitung" calls the story 'Little Indiscretions at a S O'clock Tea With Cousin Angelica,' and Introducing the dramatis personae, that paper tackles the subject about as follows: 'Well, Angelica Jegorow-na, said Councilor Stern, ' Tschlgorin has lost again. You may congratulate yourself.' These two, the speaker and the lady addressed, had made a trifling bet, Stern from patriotism and because his chief in the Government office, where he Is employed, did so, too, backed Tschigdrin. Cousin Angelica, however, selected (the young American champion, Pillsbury. ! " ' Tes. I made a fool of myself,' Stern added, with a sigh. "My only consolation, however, is that Plllsbury's victorious' ca- lifPIKIi - m M mi k m a WM pilefe-Pi iff - mi , mm 'tDsfiZ , mm iss!fe P3s Wfi&t mm wm. ws. . Hi m m Ali i! M&Wi wm mm Emile Zola the Eminent Writer ays ox - i Wn n irj THE XDEAJC. TOXICl ' It is the Elixir of Life which combats human debility and gives Vigor, Health and Energy" Mailed Free. J Descriptive Book with Testimony and Portraits OP NOTED CELEBRITIES. Keneteiol ant A Me. f. Prove deputation. ATOldSakstltvtloBS. Askfor'TiaHariaai. .At Droggiats ani Faacj Grocers. j MARIANI & CO., . l.nrr-r- : SSS Oxford etMtt. reer is a personal joy and pleasure to you.' ' " ' To be candid, I am now real sorry for Tschlgorin.' said Angelica, at the same time putting four lumps of sugar in Stern's cup. " 'So am I,' put in Miss Holznapf. Tt must be awful to lose one's reputation as a master chess player. What may be the reason for all this?" " 'Councilor Jwanero, the chief of our department, a man- who understands a lot about chess he is in possession of a beautiful set -of ivory chessmen tells me that in consequence of the unpleasantness between the chess club and the Novoe Vramya on the one side, and the other players on the other, Tchigorln has become nervous and he is suffering from a regular shock.' " 'Yes. What a pity. I have thought that he might be under a spell of hypnotism,' added Miss Holznapf. 'Englishmen,' mistaking Pillsbury for a Briton, 'are so awfully cunning, you know.' " 'I have been told,' broke in Lleut.-Co)l. Wronezitownoz, 'that Tschlgorin Is suffering from a stomach ache ever since be returned from Hastlnga' "Stern Inoked at the Colonel, Angelica at her .Cousin Fritz, and the latter, who had been a silent listener throughout, made up hia mind to clear the situation as follows: " 'According to my opinion this shock anc nervousness on Tsichigorm's part are-caused by superstition. All chess players are superstitious, and our Russian master is no exception. He has lost all confidence in himself, and he fears that his misfortune is the unavoidable outcome of an aecoTsed deed.' '"An accursed deed? Please tell us all interrupted Angelica. " 'He has made a deal with Sauworln, the editor of the "Novoe Vremya." to the effect that the scores of the games played In this tournament should only appear In that paper. This deal, and the high-handed action of the "Vremya" has greatly provoked the other papers, who, in turn, and as a matter of course, have been and are daily abusing Tschigorln. He lost the sympathies of the people, nobody feels sorry for him, and they are rather glad that the tournament has been a failure, a nuisance to the club, its members, to the oompetitors and all who at first were deeply interested. "So far the "Zeitung" is not far off the mark, but the good people here would not have troubled much abjut Tschigorin's failure had your countryman even came up to expectations. As I have written to you repeatedly, he has been backed to an enormous extent. At the time of writing there is little chance of having a similar tournament arranged at Warsaw, inasmuch as both Steinitz and Pillsbury have decided upon going home the day after the final games are played. If the thousand roubles which an enthusiastic Warsaw chess devotee offered for prizes are scarcely sufficient, and as there are little prospects, if any, to have this sum increased, the scheme will in all probability fall through. Neither am I able to give your readers further particulars, concerning the Paris business, as nothing has as yet been disclosed." The scores In the championship tournament at the Brooklyn C. C. to date, are: ' ' - ' . . Per ' . ' won. Lost-cent. Eugene Del mar 3 1-3 1 1-3 - .86 S. R. Rocamora t l .g; H. Helms TM 2 l- .75 J. Morphy t 3 .gj A. j. Souweine 7 1-2 S 1-2 - .57 C. Tatum g .1-3 4 1-2 .55 S. G. Ruth S 1-3 4 1-2 .55 J- A. E well 4 1-3 4 1-3 .54 J. W. SnowaHer 3 4 .42 R. A. Breckenridge 4 1-3 f 1-3 .40 Sr--J? .Taoe'" 41i T1"S -1 ? rT'lay 3 1-2 7 1-S .31 J. Spencer Turner 2 1 H. M. Barrett 11-3 3 1-3 jj A rapid tournament has been arranged at the Brooklyn C. C. to.-night for sixteen players; the players to give odds according to the class in the continuous tournament - A. B. Hodges will give an exhibition of simultaneous play this evening at the Progressive C C, 11-2 Second avenue. New York. The cable match between the Brooklyn C. C. and the British C. C. of London has been arranged and will be played March 13 and 14. There will be eight on each team, and only natives of the country will be allowed to play. The Brook-, lyn team has not been decided upon, but it will be selected from the following list: H. N. Pillsbury, J. W. Sho waiter, Eugene Delmar, F. M. Teed, A. B. Hodges, E. Hymes, John F. Barry, C. F. Burrille, W. M. de Visser, W. Fi Eno, A. E. Black-mar, S. R. Rocamora. Brooklyn has requested the editor of the "Chess Monthly," Leopold Haffer, to act as its umpire, and Sir George Newnes to be referee in England during the match. Games will be commenced at 10 A. M., on the morning of the 13th, an adjournment will be taken from 2 to 3, and play will cease at 7 P. M. On Saturday there will be the same hours of play, except that evening play will cease at 6:30, and all unfinished 'games will be adjudicated by Mr. Lasker. Libraries - of Ches3 Books. The largest chess library in existence, according to that excellent authority, J. D. Seguim, of "The Times Democrat," New Orlenas.is that of John G. White, of Cleveland, Ohio, who has upwards of 3.000 volumes. Baron T. von Heydebrand und der Lasa, of Wiesbaden, and Charle3 A. Gilberg, of Brooklyn, comes next with about 2,500 each. , Possibly we may place next in order a somewhat unique collection of Mr. Seguin's, which numbers now about I, 500 volumes, including numerous scrap books of chess columns,. &c, complete. E. B. Cook, of Hoboken, New Jersey, and Miron J. Hazeltine, of the "New York Clipper," have each good collections of over 1,000 volumes, Mr. Hazel tine's including some books of great rarity." We have received from Geo. W.- Brad-shawj Hastings, England, some of the photographs of the players In the recent tournament. Mr. Bradshaw has all of he twenty-two masters, except Amo3 Burn. They are excellent specimens of the photographic art, and make an useful collection of the leading p'ayers of the wor'd. The price is one shilling and sixpence each. , ; - FROM HIS OFFICE STAFF CITY WORKS COMMISSIONER WHITE GETS A PRESENT. . The immediate office staff of City Works Commissioner White, who retired from the department yesterday, preeented him with a beautiful palm in a jardiniere and the following address: "The subordinates in your office ask your acceptance of the accompanying plant as a token of affectionate regard. We are proud to have been associated with you in an administration that has been like the clear shining of the sun, and In which you have so related yourself to every phase of the -business of the department that the results achieved have been largely the expression of yourself. A marvelous mental celerity, a high order of intelligence, a thorough business and sci entific education, a vigorous physique, a conscientious devotion to the duties assumed, all have had free course in the conducting of the affairs of this great department. The outcome has been an unmatched administration and the largest public advantage. "We take pleasure In saying that we have highly appreciated the attitude of justice and courtesy which you have always maintained toward your subordinates, and, on this last day of your term of service. We ask you to please take the palm." ' Commissioner White made suitable acknowledgment. The address was signed by R. M. Whiting, Bernard Fowler, Fred B. Backus, James W. Mason, E. East-ment, Thomas L. Gill. W. V. McClure, William G. Steves, James H. Newland, George H. Brown, James E. Wilmot, Harry. W. Valentine, Matilda M. Berry, Ruben B. Caffray, Daniel T. Van.Duxer. William T. Crouch, P. J. Murty, Georg L. Murphy, Henry McGoey. NOT UPTO DATE. fly New; Ycrk Pilots t: . Discarding Sailboats. THEY MOST CATCH STEAMERS. SAILING VESSELS HAVE HAD THEIR DAY STEAM PILOT BOATS TO BE EMPLOYED WHOLLY LIMITS OF THE CRUISING GROUND ' GREATLY REDUCED ADVANTAGES OF THE NEW SYSTEM. ' "This is an age of steam and electricity; and you've got to, put on steam to keep up with it," said one of a group of pilots to a Standard Union reporter,, who bore down upon them to chat about the changes in progress In the pilot system of the port of New York. . - . -t .-' ,.. : . There are sixteen fine hoata. lying in Erie Basin, which will .be .sold cheap. Until recently they have, been skimming the seas outside the harbor, cruising1 from Sandy Hook to Sable Island -on the east- ward, and as far as to rs Cape Ha tt eras, , southward, looking for inward bound ves-' sels, upon which to place pilots. Staunchly built craft, and swift sailers, theiy have contributed to the picturesqueness ox ocean views while fulfilling a mission of usefulness from which they have been withdrawn forever. They composed a large proportion of the fleet of twenty-eight New York boats and nine New Jersey boats engaged In pilotage on this, part of the coast. Hereafter the most if them will serve the purposes of the fisherman or the coaster, though some of the better ones may be devoted to the less- wearing work of pleasure cruising. ... A portion of the fleet remains" lh ''eom-miEsion, but it is the smaller proportion and the boats comprised in it will survive the others in their present , career only a short time. . Steam drove- the others off the cruising ground.-.. One stepmer stationed at the bar rendered their presence superfluous. With the aid of this steamer the remaining boats are able to cover the cruising ground effectively, for the new system has contracted the limits, and the pilots no longer sail nine hundred miles or so to find a job. Now they do not go beyond a line drawn from Fire Island to Barnegat, which gives them only about one hundred miles to cover. . . . i" "What is the effect of itr": one of the pilots said," repeating the reporter's .ques- . tion. "Well, one 6r toe effects- of it is that we don't have, to .waste . so much time. We don't have to go so far; nor have so much uncertainty; nor have to spend so much time on ships "when we are not wanted until they get nearer to the land. Why it got so that some of the pilots hardly made a living. The new system evens things up more. The old one was behind the times anyway. Sailing vessels are things of the past, ; and for pilot service they ire no good at ali, any -longer." ... ' In reply to an inquiry as to now many mercantile craft come into - the port of New York under sail during a" season none of the pilots In the group could tell, but they said that this class of shipping was no good to them in their business. It is to the steamships. ' passenger and freight, that they look for the profit of their calling, and to catch the "steamers, they said, steamers will have to be employed. The white-winged boats, have to go, and will be replaced ere long by a fleet of swift steam cruisers. . "The new system is satisfactory to the sea captains, I suppose," the reporter suggested interrogatively. "Yes, and in several ways," was the reply. "The captains of these b'g steamers don't want to pick up their pilits away out to sea. They have no ue for them out there, and although they t"ke them on board, the pilots are only passengers, after all, " "-rl h0 un , Bvt-p-tlmes there . is no accommodation for them. Besides ,thls. any caotain would rather have a pilot who is only a day nr two out of port, and who would be more likely to know of recent.lv sunken otci' or derelicts. -Another thi-g which w'.'l mke the captains satisfied. Js tint they, will not be in feir of running down ana sinking 4a pilot boat now and then, as might happen when. so. many are cruising about. As to th- p'lct. he goes on duty as soon as he gets on h"-iirL. and , -of course, he has a bptter chinee to do anfHr-ipnt work to srive him a livine." I "Where- is the next generation of pilots (to come from?" the reporter .asked. The pilots did not eomprenena tnis question. "I mean how are men to be trained in practical seamanship and furnished with other qualifications for performing the duties of pilots?" The pilots laughed at this )andlubbrly question, and one of them . . repH'ea :v "They're going to be trained jUJrt the same as they always were. .When all. the boats were in commission one apprentice was allowed to each boat- Now there are three. When we get the steamers the number of aoprentlees will be the same as ever, only there will be more than three to each boat. That will depend upon how may steam cruising vesse'.s .we have," None of the boats in Erie Basin has yet been sold. Only one offer has been made as yet, and it was too ridiculously, low to be considered; - Following Is a list of the boats and the prices placed on them: Jesse Carll Built at Northport in 1885; length on water line. 90 ft.; beam. 23 ft. 3; depth. 8 ft. 6; (rigging steel), one year old; draft. 10 tt. -5. Price, J5.500. Ezra Nve Built .1859; length,. . 10 ft. 5; beam, 19 ft. 5; depth, 7 ft.; tonnage. 46.44; thoroughly repaired and new rigging 1891 and refastened. Price, $1,500.- Edward F. Williams Built 1863; length. 76 ft,; beam. 21 ft.; depth. 7 ft. 7; rebuilt In 1888; draft, 19 ft. Price. $4,000. Actaea Built 1880; length, 94 ft 9; beam, 22 It. 1; depth. 9 ft. 1; thoroughly overhauled in 1891 ; in good order: Price, $4,500. Fannie Built 1861; rebuilt from the keel up, with new decks and eigging; length. 76 ft.; beam. 19 ft.; depth.' ft. 1; rebuilt 1890; draft, 9 ft. Price. $4,000. U,.... Joseph F. Loubat Built 18S0; length, 80 feet. 4: beam, 21 ft. 5; depth, 9 ft. 1; tonnage, 70.47; put in good, order in 1893. Price, $4,000. James Stafford Built in 18SS: length. 72 ft, 3: beam. 21 ft. 5: depth, 8 ft. 9; tonnage, 59.3; in good condition. Price. $5 500. Mary A Williams-Built 1861; rebuilt in 1892 from the keel up; length, 77 ft.; beam, 18 ft. 5; depth, 7 ft. 9; draft, 9 ft. 6. Price, $5,500. . - - ; - Joseph Pulitzer Built 1894: length. 78 ft.; beam, 22 ft,; depth, 9.4; tonnage, 76.85. Price; $7,000. America Built 1880; tonnage, 78.42; length, 79.8; beam. 2L1;. depth, 8.7; rigging new. Price, $5,500. , Edmund Blunt Built 1858; ' length. J " ft 9; beam, 20 ft. .6; depth. 8 ft 1: dr-of water, 10 ft; repaired In 1SS8, corr--and refastened. Price. $2,000. t Charles H. ""Marshall Built i" length, 77 ft 9: beam, 20 ft; depth, 7 coppered; rebuilt, from the keel u 1881; draft, 9 ft 6; In goad order. i $4,000. - 1 William H. Starbuck Tonnasre; length, 75 ft 6; beam, 21 ftt depth. 9it. 5; -builf 1886; draft, 10 ftr. Price, $5,000. Edmund Driggs Tonnase, 41.68; Itngth, 66 ft; beam, 18.5; depth, 7.6; built in 1S64; rebuilt in 1888; draft, 8 ft Price, $3,500. R. K. Fox Tonnage, 47.68; length, S3 V ft; beam, 20 ft; depth; 7 ft; thoroughly repaired with new rigging in 1S93; built in 1876. Price. $4,000. Eben D. Jordan Tonnage, 6S.S1; length. ; beam, 21.2; depth, 9.8; built at Bos ton In 1883. Price, $5,500. KING SOLOMON LODGE. ANNUAL RECEPTION AND BALL AT SAENGERBUND HALL. The annual ball and reception of King Solomon Lodge, No. 28, of the I. O. F. S. of I., will be held In Saengerbund Hall, Smith and Schermerhorn streets, on Sunday evening, Feb. 16. . Catarrh Cannot be Cured with LOCAL AFPLICATTOKS, as t-ey cannot reach the seat ot the dist-asa, Catarrq ia a blood or constitutional aea, and In or er to cure it you must Hlce Internal remedies. HaU'a Catarrh Care taken internally, uii acts directly on the blood and mucous surf-ice. Hail's Catarrh Cure is not quack u exiicin -. It was , prescribed by one of the beat phvgicinns m this country for years, and ts areituiar prescription, f Jt is oornposed of the best tonics kDOwn.com-bineil with toe best blood punni-rs. bo i--ir directly on the mucoua surfaces. Tfce perfect com. bine (loo of the two Inaradtonts Is what rrot-n.T sucb wonderful result in curlcg Cuierrc. t for laatimooiais tree. F.J CHE.vtrca, Tropa., r Sold by Drugg.t.s, ..e . ..j. (

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