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The Times-Tribune from Scranton, Pennsylvania • 65

Publication:
The Times-Tribunei
Location:
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Issue Date:
Page:
65
Extracted Article Text (OCR)

By ANN RULE -I RULE 3 Harvey Louis Carignan used his highly-profitable gas station as bait for one of his most heinous crimes. 4 4 4 4 PA. a go 40-; 0 To- ,,,.,,.....,,.,4,,,,,,,,,, i i i 1 Ai Illj '111' 4,0 life. DIO 4. ti 0 if Tern 0 ant 0 1.,,, tX, '4 1 0, 1 ,..4 -t 1.

44'- 4- '-i se 2, 4. .1.: A l' -it. Harvey Louis Carignan used his highly -profitable s- ,3, gas station as bait for one of his most heinous crimes. 1. I l' A.

SeatHe THE HUGE MAN on the witness stand in the Hennepin County, Minn. courtroom had bards like hams, a brow that resembled that of a latter-day Cro- Magnon man, and he seemed to care little that he was on trial on ehargea that eould put him behind bars for 40 years. Was he truly mad, in the legal sense, or was he clever, trying to convince the jury that his actions had been of an avenging angel of the Lord 'I "Mertify therefore your mem(hers which are upon the earth; fornication, uncleanness, jnordiaffection, evil concupiscence, and covetousness, which i3 idolatry." Colossians, Chapter 111, Verse 5. It was It, rot indeed grotesqueAu hear the Bible cited in a courtroom here the testimony of a witness concerned brutal acts of se.v.,al perversion, and a beating that almo it co her her life. But it was the defense of Harvey Louis ('arignan, a man whose crimes of vintenee toward wanain lia I begun 25 years earlier, a man who has been suspected of as many as 1st) attitels on -women from 'Seattle to It was not a case of 'The Bevil made tne do it." Carignan insisted that Cod had instigated the crimes, that he had only been following the biblical passage above, Ile was ridding the world of "harlots." and it appeared to matter not at all that the young women -he had attacked were sweet and wholesome, innocent and far too trusting of a stranger, Had is Black Past The story of Harvey Carignan must begin in the f-his black career.

It was May 2, BM when winsome Katherine Sue Miller, of Seattle, answered an ad in that city's evening newspaper. The advertiser was seeking part-time help in his north, end service station. Kathy wasn't, calling for herself; she was doing a favor for a boy friend who a paper route after school and hadn't time to call. Just three weeks from her 16th birthday, she yearned for a job, too to help her widowed'and working mother and her younger brother, she was 3 urprked and delighted when the station operator said that he also was looking for female employes, and she eagerly agreed to meet him the next afternoon in front of a department store. Her mother was not so pleased.

She erplained to Katherine that that wasn't hoer one applied for a job, that Kathy should be interviewed at the man's place of business. She elicited a promise from Kathy that she wouldn't meet the man. But Kathy, who had never disobeyed before, bent the agreement a little; she couldn't bear to miss the opportunity. She arranged to have her boy friend walk her to the busy corner He planned to wait with het until the man who isail he drove a maroon sedan arrived. The appointed hour came and went, and the boy -friend had to leave for his paper route.

He urged Kathy to go home, but she said she wanted to wait just a few minutes more, it was the last time he saw the long-haired teenager, then wearing a blue jumper and carrying an armload of school books. eSiVben Kathy's mother got home from work, Kathy wasn't there. Nor did she turn up for supper. By 7 p.m., Mrs. was terribly worried.

She had called MAN on the witness in the Itennepin County, courtroom bad bards like brow that resembled that of a Cro- Magnon man, and he rare little that he was on trial that could put him behind 40 years. Was be truly in I seme, or was he clever, trying nee the jury that his actions 1 of an avenging angel of 7 rtify therefore your mem- which are upon the earth; leation, uncleanness, inordi- affection, evil concupis- -e. and covetousness, which lolatry." an Chapte III Verse 5 0 I if rot indeed gro- hear the Bible cited in a Ill Nk here the testimony of a aitness concerned brutal acts 11 perversion, and a beating. that her her life. Itot it was the of liarvey t'arigrian, a lesn crimes of vinicnee toward I tieviin 25 years earlier.

a rnan 3 been suspected of as many as icls on women from 'SettltIe tO not a rase of The 'Devil Trtade Ilan insisted that Cod tigated the crimes, that he bad fo )wing the biblical passage clh Ile a ts ridding the world of v. and it appeared to matter not that the young women he had ki, were sweet and wholesome, and far too trusting of a Block Past story of flarvey Carignan must th midillkaLhis black career. May 2. 1973 'when winsome Kath- silver canopy. They wanted mightily to search those vehicles, but, when there is no body, there is no crime, in the legal sense.

They left the scowling Carignan and tried other avenues in their search for Kathy. Hone for her safe return dimmed considerably the next day when employes of an Everett plywood plant, 26 miles north of Seattle, found schoolbooks lying in the narking lot. They were Kathy Miller's; her social security card -was found with them. iln a case that was to be marked with a series of frustrating clues, the cornplete lack of any latent prints on the books was a precursor of things to come. The books had been wet, and the finders, to be helpful, had wiped therm dry.

birthday on May 23 came and went; her new 10-speed bicycle, the present she'd asked for. waited. as lid the new dress her grandmother had continued to sew in the weeks since she'd been gone. Always On the Go Carignan, under constant surveillance, became more and more surly with each contact made by the detectives. He was on the move constantly.

This was rothing new for him; information to police indicated that he had put 200.000 miles on one vehicle he owned in less than a year. It was almost as if he liked to play cat-and-mouse with cops. He would head up mountain passes to timbered isolated areas, where detectives feared Kathy might he buried, and then turn around and return to Seattle. 'At one point, a police helicopter took over observation of the suspect, only to be forced to an emergency landing because of mechanical difficulties. The public cried for an arrest, but the cops' hands we'-' tied: they had no body only a missing person.

On Sunday, June 4, they had a body. Two young Indian boys who lived on the Tula lio Indian Reservation, a few miles north of Everett, were looking for 'Salmon berries in the deep woods off the Water Works Road when they stumbled across a large bundle, wrapped tightly in black vinyl sheeting. The stench was so bad they did not disturb it, but ran to a phone and called Snohomish County authorities. Detective Doug Engelbretson responded and knew at once he was looking at a body in advanced stages of decomposition. Dental records would prove that the skeletonized corpse was that of Kathy Sue Miller.

She had suffered a terrible silver canopy. They wanted mightily ta search those vehicles, but when there is no body, there is no crime, in the legal sense. They left the scowling Carignan and tried other avenues in their search foil Kathy. 'Hone for her safe return dimmed considerably the next day when em- ployes of an Everett plywood plant, 2 miles north of Seattle, found school-, books lying in the narking lot. The3 were Kathy Millers her social security card -was found with them a case that was to be marked with a series of frustrating clues, the corn plete ktck of any latent prints on tiu books was a precursor of things tt come.

The books had been wet, and thi finders, to be had wiped then dry. 'Kathy's birthday on May 23 earn, ail of Kathy's friends. No one had seen her. The frantic mother leafed through the previous night's paper and found the ad Kathy had circled. She called the service station and talked with the owner, Harvey Carignan.

He said he was to have interviewed Kathy, but that she did not keep the appointment. He sounded sincere enough, but both Kathy, always truthful, and her friend, had insisted that she would be picked up. Mrs. Miller reported Kathy as a missing person. The circumstances of the teenager's disappearance -were odd enough that the case was assigned immediately to homicide unit detectives Duane Homan and Bill Baughman.

They began a routine check on the station owner, Harvey Carignan. Be was a highly-successful businessman, pumping more gas than most other stations in his area. But his background was enough to make their blood run cold. Sentenced to Hong Carignan had graduated from reform school into the Army in the late '40s, had been ztationed in 'Anchorage, Alaska, at Fort Richardson. There, in 1949, he had been sentenced to hang for the murder of 57-year-old Laura Showalter, whose beaten, sexually-abused body was found in a parking lot in downtown Anchorage.

Harvey didn't hang; the Ninth Circuit Court ruled on an appeal in 1951 that his confession in his first trial was invalid because testimony had not shown that it was voluntary. He was tried again, convicted again, and sentenced to prison. Ile went to McNeil Island and then Alcatraz, and was paroled in 1960. He was out only a few months when he was convicted on burglary charges and was back inside the walls, this time Leavenworth, for four more years. Harvey moved to Seattle, but he wasn't a free man for long.

He went up again for burglary, to the Walla Walla State Penitentiary, and was paroled in 1968. The 6-foot-2-inch 200-pound ex-con hadn't had much time for marriage during his years in and out of prison. He was 40 when he took his first wife. It was a stormy and Harvey was to say later in court that he'd had a message from Cod ti kill her after she'd refused to serve him supper, that he'd gone so far as to wait for her with a hammer at the bottom of the stairs. Fortunately, the lady had already packed and left and he was not to see her again for six months.

He remarried the following April. He was working hard now, making the gas station pay off, but, according to Carignan, this marriage too went sour. The message from beyond regarding Wife No. 2 was to hit her hard, but don't kill her which he did, with his fists. Homan and Baughman called upon Carignan at his service station and asked the same questions about 'Kathy Miller that her mother bad.

He insisted that he'd never seen the girl and maintained that he was being harassed just because he happened to 'have a felony record. The detectives noted that Carignan had two vehicles: a maroon 1966 Olds Toronado, and a 1968 Chevrolet pick-up camper, yellow with black stripes and a.

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