The Herald-News from Passaic, New Jersey on March 3, 1973 · 14
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The Herald-News from Passaic, New Jersey · 14

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Saturday, March 3, 1973
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"V v V- w W V w v v" 14 The Herald-News, Saturday, March 3, 1973 Issue to arouse of amnesty fails U. S. Heart 'exiles Christian Science Monitor News Service STOCKHOLM "America isn't all apple pie and mom," Desmond Carragher says. "It isn't a country that prepares people to leave and live elsewhere." British by birth, American by citizenship, and about to become Swedish by choice, Des is' one of those former . American soldiers who chose exile in Sweden to service in Vietnam. . "We cannot provide forgive-ness for them," President Nixon has said. If they want to return to the United States, . they will have to pay the penalty. "Not a junket in the Peace Corps or something like that" but -"a criminal p e n a 1 1 y for disobeying the laws of the United States." The exiles' response, judging from interviews here and in Malmo, is neither anger nor pleading but a kind of resigned indifference. "I don't think anyone cares," says Terry Whitmore,. a black from Memphis who was awarded the Purple Heart and the. Bronze Star in p Vietnam before going un- ' derground in Japan. He is studying to be a draftsman, at Swedish Government expense, is engaged to a Swedish girl,' and is captain of an amateur basketball team, the Stockholm Stars, composed mostly of Americans most of them blacks. "We're not the criminals in , this war," says George Meals, a recording engineer at the University o f Stockholm. George came to Sweden from an Army camp in Georgia five years ago He admits he occasionally misses his home city,. Atlanta, and says he would "probably go back" if granted an unconditional amnesty. "But I don't think w e committed any crimes, anrjM'm not going to crawl, and beg." PoHtical activists There are, of course, politi-cal activists like Mike Powers, who thinks it is "unprincipled" even to think about amnesty at a time when permanent peare in Vietnam is far from assured. And there are drifters and misfits who seemed to be fleeing as much" from themselves as from the war in Vietnam, i But if any common thread runs through the great variety of motives expressed by the approximately 500 American exiles who have come to Sweden, either as deserters or to escape the draft, it is perhaps best summed up in words of a black social worker who himself took refuge in this neutral northern land from his Army unit in West Germany five years ago. "Most of the cats who come here," says Herb Washington, "just want to be human." Des C a r r a g h e r , for instance, is a first-generation American. At the age of 11 he was taken to Oregon by his mother, along with his brother and sister. Des, like the other members of his family, accepted the American dream. He joined the Army, went to West Germany, attended noncommissioned officers school. There the dream began to crumble. All 'ithat he was taught how to kill, how to resist brainwashing and torture in captivity seemed dehumanizing. Sooner or later he knew he would end up in Vietnam. It was 1948, and Sweden was becoming known as a place of refuge for Army deserters refusing Vietnam service. He was not a political radical; he didn't know enough about the arguments for or against the war to choose either side. But "I knew I valued my own life," and going to Vietnam was "too important a step for ms to make" when he lacked the certainty that it was the right thing to do. He thought matters through for two weeks and then decided to make his break. He has . never looked back since. My Lai factor George Meals was at a base hospital in Georgia when he came into contact with Vietnam war veterans who told him about My Lai-type incidents they had witnessed. "The more I stayed in the Army the more I saw this wasn't a gentleman's war in V i e t n a m , " he comments d r y 1 y . A sympathetic company commander alloweyum to apply for conscientious-ob-j e c t o r status. After some weeksof "waiting he heard through the headquarters grapevine that his application had been rejected in Washington. 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Funds; Accumultlv Bond Cont Growth , Cont Income Income Science Vanguard Value Line Fd: Value Line Income Levrged Grth Sped Sit Vance Sanders: Boston Common Special Vonderbilt Vanguard Fd Vant Ten Ninfy Varied Indust Viking Grth n Wall St Growth WashtnMutual I Welllngtn Group: Explorer Fnd West Fund Morgan Fund Technivest n Trustees EaJ toeiiesley Inc Wellington Fd Windsor Fund Western Indust Westfleld Grwth Wincap Fund Winfioid Gth in Wisconsin Fd rnler Fund 11.02 0.64 865 14.34 2.71 9,71 10.37 19.17 34.43 17.13 3.8 7.27 -,S 9.13 11.49 14.15 0.21 16.20 3.78 6.27 4.77 8.09 6.71 10.13 21.19 18.42 10.39 13.39 7.58 9.18 11.39 8.76 11.46 2.37 13.42 9.02 7.48 12.17 6.53 9.57 5.14 5.50 5.68 4.97 9.96 49.70 3.50 1.31 1.55 22.95 11.43 16.54 1075 10.40 8.46 14.06 2.64 9.55 10.10 19.08 34 06 17.03 3.73 7.20 8.03 9.01 11.24 13.95 10.07 15.91 3.72 6.18 4.68 7.99 6.65 9.80 20.71 18.34 10.25 12.61 7.51 8.93 11.32 8.68 11.05 12.23 13.20 i 91 7.38 11.98 6.23 9.31 5.06 5.46 5.57 4.94 9.89 48.75 3.40 1.30 1.51 22.68 11.32 16.28 10.96 .22 10.59 .27 8.52 .25 14.32 .02 2.69 .02 9.58 .40 10.10 .45 19.12 .10 34.42 .46 17.13 .11 3.79 .08 7.22 .08 8.09 .24 9.13 '.05 11.43 .22 14.1 .07 10.16 .14 15.91 .59 3.77 .05 6.27 .05 4.71 .17 7.9V .15 6.67 .09 9.S5 33 20.72 .64 18.34 .13 10.38 .12 12.83 .87 738 .13 .29 8.93 11.36 8.68 .14 11.05 37 12.23 .21 13.20 .27 9.01 .10 7.44 .13 12.17 6 28 .35 9.55 .17 5.11 .07 5.47 .06 5.60 .13 4.97 .03 9.89 .11 49.70 .07 3.45 .10 1.30 .01 1.55 .01 22.82 .27 11.36 .15 16.40 .25 6.57 8.87 9.99 6.76 8.27 6.49 8.81 9JJ5 6.68 8.04 9.66 9.51 KMIW 9.S8 VSl 9.36 10.17 10.01 10.14 .15 n-No load lu.1. 6.04 9.03 11.18 13.52 2.96 4.10 1261 10.39 9.89 9.90 14.52 9.28 11.43 13.97 765 8.28 10.94 11.00 15.05 7.44 7.72 6.11 4.84 8.48 4.04 7.64 8.33 8.64 6.43 2.97 6.84 4.32 6.50 9.10 12.01 23.82 ' 0 88 12.11 7.60 13.02 12.40 11.77 8.54 4.21 9.5V 5.72 4.64 6.19 10.29 5.96 8.90 10.99 13.19 286 4.05, 12.30 10.22 980 9.77 14.35 9.13 11.08 13.81 7.49 8.26 10.69 10.73 14.83 7.34 7.57 597 4.79 8.29 3.94 7.59 8.13 8.54 623 2.82 6.76 4.20 6 42 8.95 11.93 23 50 10.74 11.94 7.49 12 90 12.37 11.55 8.40 4.08 9.40 5.42 4.50 6.15 10.10 6.52 .10 8.83 ,09 9.90 .29 6.75 .08 8.04 VI. W 9.55 .22 10.00 .07 9.38 y8 .12 5.96 .11 8.95 .19 11.12 .19 13.49 .36 2.89 .14 4.10 .04 12.41 .43 10.22 .20 9.87 .11 9.79 -r- .23 14 52 .08 9.27 .11 11.08 .49 13.85 .22 7.58 -.19 newspapers splashed the story of the "Intrepid four" sailors on the aircraft carrier Intrepid who, after serving in Indochina waters, had deserted their ship in Japan and had been smuggled through the Soviet Union to Sweden, which had given them political refuge. The news had a "terrific impact on me," George recalls. He applied for a passport, typed some leave papers for himself, and "split for Sweden." Terry Whitmore was in the hospital in Japan after having been wounded in action in Vietnam and personally decorated by President Johnson at Cam R'anh when the story of the "Intrepid four" broke. "Deserters?" he said to himself. "Them cats is cowards! I ain't no coward." But he was not eager to return to Vietnam, and during his convalescence he met a ' Japanese girl who became his friend and who was bitterly anti-Vietnam war, as many young people in Japan Were. Then came the news of the ' assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. "That really shocked me," he says. "Here I'd been fighting for America thousands of miles from home, and then this thing happened, right in. my home town." - . His girl friend's brother discovered that the same Japa-n e s e organization that had smuggled the "Intrepid! four" out to Sweden could do the same for him. And so, after a flight to the northern island of Hokkaido and a fake capture by a Soviet patrol boat, Terry, too, came to Sweden. Terry enjoys the wannest of relations with his Swedish fiancee's parents, who run a dry-cleaning store. '.'We can get to the bottom of problems in discussing things with them," he says. In fact, Terry feels, Vit's . easier for blacks to adjust to Swedish society than whites, simply because the white American has never accepted anyone to be his equal. Other blacks, particularly in the southern port of Malmo across the strait from- Copen-- hagen, disagree. Swedes are not racially liberal, says Herb Washington. His Danish wife has been talked to by some of her friends for having married a black. Narcotics problem Among both whites and r blacks, narcotics have been a problem not merely marU juana or hashish, but heroin and "speed." Among 14 Americans in Swedish jails 12 of them in Malmo many have been charged with narcotics offenses. The difficulties of learning a new language, the unfamiliar experience of being in a foreign land, the relative availability of drugs lead some exiles to feel they have no recourse except to drugs or psychiatric wards or both.. And yet, despite unfavorable newspaper publicity given to accounts of American deserters crimes, Sweden, . with its long tradition of neu-t r a 1 i t y and its "cradle-to-grave" welfare state, has been unusually generous in taking in Amerfcan desertpw. and drift escapeesaj&Hfying to help 'integrate.fm into the " national community. A Unlike many other coun-tained by the police while tries, where refuges are de-awaiting permission to stay, Sweden allows applicants rent' and a weekly social-security benefit as soon as they have registered with the police. Once permission is granted, the would-be immigrant is given eight weeks' language training and additional vocational training at government expense. " Eddie Smith, a black from New York, has. his driver's license but must go through a chauffeur's school (at government expense) before he can obtain a taxi license. He hopes eventually to buy a taxi in partnership with a Swedish taxi driver he knows. What of the future? Eddie thinks occasionally of Canada it's closer to home and there is no language problem. Canada, in fact, is where the great majority of American deserters and draft escapees have gone. ' . BROWNS MILLS Tune- ups for electronic heart pacemakers within the body are being carried out by remote control at the Deborah Heart and Lung Center here. And patients also are offered checkups by home telephone. The tune-up has been made possible by a new pacemaker named Omnicor in which both the rate of the heart beat and the enabling battery power can be' varied independently by a radio magnetic control unit from outside the body. The procedure can be accomplished in 15 seconds. In effect, the pacemaker can be adjusted to the individual needs of the patient after being surgically inserted. : Dr. Dryden P. Morse of Moorestown, head of - De-fa o r a h ' s pacemaker clinic, said that when a pacemaker is implanted, the power must be set high enough for both the ordinary patient and for one with a more resistant heart. "With the Omnicor," he explained, "we can make heart rate and pacemaker power adjustments a f t e r the patient's heart has had an opportunity to adapt to the presence of a pacemaker. "For the first time we can easily tailor the pacemaker to the precise requirements of the patient by a non-invasion technique." The adjustments can be made by an electronic control unit about the size of a handheld food mixer, Dr. Morse said. The capability of adjusting battery power levels, he said, is a major advantage for the patient. Because the current drain can be reduced, he explained, the battery life may be ex-t ended to more than four years. The life of a regular pacemaker, he said, is usually 18 to 30 months before being surgically replaced. In a related advance,' patients with pacemakers are given a small electronic box to take home. With the use of two pencil-like electrodes from the box, the functioning of his pacemaker can be checked by telephone by Deborah's special check-up service. No hospital visit is needed. The patient's pulse also can be checked over the telephone at, the same time to make pacemaker only firing but also is - synchronizing with or "captur-ing" the heart. Deborah specializes in the medical and surgical treat- tune-ups made ment of heart and lung dis eases. It is open to all, regardless of ability to pay. The hospital is maintained through the efforts of thousands of easy volunteers affiliated with some 300 chapters,, and by contributions from labor, industry, management and the professions. .l , mms&m NEWARK (AP)-The U.S. Attorney's office here has filed 674 charges against Sea-train Lines of Weehawken, one of the nation's largest shipping firms, in connection with alleged violations of the National Shipping Act. Sea train was accused Thursday of giving preferred treatment, to some big customers in the form of reduced rates, a violation of the federal act, which was designed to prevent large shipping firms from unfairly competing with smaller companies. Among the shippers that alleged received special treatment were Singer Co., Sears R o e b u c k and Co., General Electric, Justerini & Brooks, Gimbels and Hartz Mountain Pet Food. - Also named in the complaint were Seatrain International, a subsidiary corpora-t i o n , two officials and a former official. ' ' Those named were William Gohlke of Mahwah, vice president of the Seatrain container division; William Cole of Westfield, former head of the container division wfyo is working for the conroanv in surethe pacemaker isjotothercapacityT-.and-Leon Patient's Pacemaker is "reprogramnred" at Deborah Center Seatrain file cites favors to big clients ard Butler of Essex tells, a former vice president of the container division. , A Seatrain spokesman said the company was withholding comment until it had time to study the federal complaint. If convicted, the corporate defendants could each be fined $3.37 million while the individual defendants face fines of up to $220,000 each. Peace Corps 12 years old 8.27 10.94 10.73 14.9? 7.42 7.60 6.10 .12 4.84 .02 8.29 .51 3.99 .13 7.64 t- .05 8.16 .28 8.54 .22 6.24 .29 2.82 .15 6.79 .13 4.24 .13 6.43 .17 8.97 .22 11.99 .17 23.69 .56 10.83 .22 12.04 .19 7.56 .09 12.93 .28 12.37 .05 11.62 .21 I 8.54 .03 4.16 .15 9.42 .21 5.51 .28 4.55 .14 6.19 .05 10.21 .26 LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL WASHINGTON - Twelve years ago this week America's Peace Corps was "born. Its first 450 volunteers were mostly recent college graduates. But over the years requests for technically skilled volunteers grew steadily. Recent college graduates, who numbered almost 90 per cent of the volunteer force in 1962, last year comprised only 45 "per cent of the 7,000-strong corps. Today, Peace Corps head Donald K. Hess celebrated the Corps' 12th birthday with a vigorous appeal for all types of volunteers, regardless of age, skill or experience. "The need and demand for every variety of volunteer is there and it's growing. In 12 weeks we can train a liberal arts feraduate to be an Eng- lish teacheirin Tunisia,-t)rhr- tne same period give a car-j penter the skills necessary to impart his knowledge to Fiji Islanders. "We believe that Americans, in the unique tradition of this country, will step forward in growing numbers to help and share their skills and knowledge abroad," said Hess. Dr. Sammartino back from Africa RUTHERFORD Dr. Peter Sammartino, president--emeritus of Fairleigh Dickinson University and a member of the Presidential Board of Foreign Scholarships, has returned from an official visit to Africa. The three-week tour included visits to Liberia, Cameroon, Gabon, Zaire, Ethiopia and- the Sudan. Dr. Sammartino is a resident of Ruth--erford. r LEGAL LEGAL 1973 LOCAL MUNICIPAL BUDGET Local Budget of th City of Passaic, County ot Passaic for the fiscal year 1973. It Is hereby certified that the budget annexed hereto ond hereby mode a part hereof Is a true copy of fh budget approved Dyresolirtlon of the oovernlno &dy on the 8th doy of February, 1973, ond thot public advertisement will b made in accordance with the provision, of rI.J.S.40A: Art. ANTHONY C. MARTINI, Clerk . City holl, Passaic New Jersey Certified by me 201-471-3300 . . This 8th day of February, 1973 . It i hereby certified that the- approved budget annexed hereto and hereby mode a part hereof Is an exact copy of the original on file with the clerk of the that all additions are correct, all statements contained herein are In proof and the total of anticipated revenues equals the total of appropriations. : PAUL G. CAM1SA ' of John W. Wehmon & Co. Registered Municipal Accountant P.O. Box 711M, Morrlstown, New Jersey 07960 - ' J 201 539-2336 . Certified by me This 8th doy of February, 193 - COMMENTS OR CHANGES REQUIRED AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF DIRECTOR OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES The chanaes or comments which follow must be considered In connection with further action on this budget: City of Passaic, County of Passaic LOCAL BUDGET NOTICE SeC Local Budget of the City of Possalc, County of Passaic for the fiscal year 1973. . . Be It Resolved, that the following statements of revenues and appropriations shall constitute the local budget for the year "73Be It Further Resolved, that said budget be published In Possalc Herald-News In the Issue of March 3, 1973. The governing body of the City of Passaic does hereby approve the following as the budget for the year W3. -RECORDED VOTE Ayes: Kuren, Olszowy, Panucclo, Ryan, Salek, Sorkin, Goldman. Nays: None. Abstained: None. AbSeNotice0,iT hereby given that the budget and tax resolution was approved by the City Council of the City of Passaic, County f PA hMr'inrorthbuVetond tax resolution will "be held at Passaic City Hall, on March 15, 1973 ot o'clock P-m. at which timi nd pla obiections to said budget ond tax resolution for the year 1973 may be presented by taxpayers or other 'ntercsted persons. t ; . EXPLANATORY STATEMENT SUMMARY OF CURRENT FUND SECTION OF APPROVED BUDGET 3enerol Appropriations For: 1. Municipal Purposes . Local District School Purposes In Municipal Budget ........................... Reserve tor Uncollected Taxes Based on Estimated 95.3 Per Cent of Tax Collections . January 1, 1973 to June 30, 1973 July 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974 .... LEGAL 304,602.50 152,301.25 Total Miscellaneous Revenues fo1iUnnrnl,Tn,7Ralf, ,by I".? ,or S"'"'0 Municipal Budget: twAdditA Total Amount to be Raised by Taxes for Support of Municipal Budget .... 7. Total GeneroMJevenues $ 3,632,047.41 $ 4,918,255.17 t 5,082,448.04 S 425,000.00 $ 375,000.00 t 384,686.80 $ 6,557,047.41 5,793,255.17 $ 5,967,134.84 $ 3,068,511.19 $ 4,039,989.90 184,280.50 205,503.50 . S 3,252,791.69 $ 4,245,493.40 S 4,346,819.07 t 9,809,839.10 (10,038,748.57 $10,313,953.91 beVn allotted to the ctpantynlTeld'r calVbyWfi,eaSStae.e!IVed ,OT M5h 0r 8. GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS (A) Operations CURRENT FUND APPROPRIATIONS Appro prlated ,, YEAR. M $ 1,820,982.03 416,818.50 572,038.57 S 8,993,351.25 421,858.50 623,538.82 4. Total General Appropriations ' 5. less: Anticipated Revenues Other Than Current Property Tax Building Aid Allowance for Schools State Aid 1973, $23238.00; 1972, $216,355.00. (I.e. Surplus, Miscellaneous Revenues and Receipts from Delinquent Taxes) i. Difference: Amount to be Raised by Taxes for Support of Municipal Budget (as follows): (a) Local Tax for Municipal Purposes Including Reserve for Uncollected Taxes (b) Addition -W Local District School Tax 9,809,839.10 10,038,741.57 6,557,047.41 3,068,511.19 184,280.50 3,793,255.17 4,039,989.90 205,503.50 SUMMARY OF Budget . Budget Appropriations Adopted Budget Appropriations Added by N.J.S. 40A:4-87 Emergency Appropriations ....i .Total Appropriations Expenditures: Paid or Charged (Including Reserve for Uncollected Taxes) Reserved Total Expenditures and Unexpended Balances Canceled 1972 APPROPRIATIONS EXPENDED AND CANCELED . General Budget - ' 1 9,384,381 44 . ' " Explanation of Appropriations for "Other Expenses" 654 367 13 n'firJi Th nmnnnte nnnrnnrlaterf under the title of "Other Ex- '" . n.n.." are for operating costs other than "Salaries and , $10,069,878.57 Wages." ' Some of the Items Included In "Other Expenses" are: A.A!At ninnlla. nnH nnnhnnHnhie MtliDment. Repairs 'and maintenance of buildings, equipment, roads, Contractual services for garbage and trosh removal, fire hurirnnl nlr Prlntina ondJ advertising, utility services, Insuronce and many other Items essential to the service rendered by municipal government ..$ 9,520,799.27 ,, 549,079.30 ..510,069,878.57 The 1973 Budget presentedherewflh shows a total of 19,809,839.10 tor Local municipal purposes inciuams i , of $572,038.57 o rv -fW-JlweHec foxes -and $416,818, otor 401001 ueoi eryi J e wiai o. "jy.wiy ""7 ""J include .School and County Taxes which yr $6,320.1 IJXJS raised tor Local Municipal in iy3 is wea.ni.vt. me n iw if "' r...w. School and County tax Increases Is estimated to be $4.52. CURRENT FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES GENERAL REVENUES 1. Surplus Anticipated Total Surplus Anticipated - 3. Miscellaneous Revenues: - , Licenses: ' Alcoholic Beverages Other .. Fees and Permits: Building Other , Fines and Costs: Municipal Court - Other t 7. State Road Aid Formula Fund Interest and Costs on Taxes Parking Meters Bus Receipts Taxes Franchise Taxes Grossr ':i,elpts Taxes .v... State Aid Railroad Tax (R.S. 54:29A) Replacement Revenue Business Personal Property (R.S. 54:11D) . State Sales Tax Aid Per Capita (R.S. 54:32B-30, Et. Seq.) Interest on Investments and Deposits Gasoline Tax Refunds City of Clifton Sewer Connections Financial Business Tax (Chapter 174, P L. 1946) Building Aid Allowance for Schools State Aid Federal Housing Projects In Lieu of Taxes Annual Service Charge Limited Dividend Housing Corporations Pec R.S. 55:16-1 Et. Seq.) r .: Revenue from Olf Street Parking Lots Slate Hralth Aid Chapter 36, P. L. 1966 .. v SLEPA Community Oriented Police Dept Emergency Employment Act State Health Aid Rodent Control '. State N.J. Urban Aid Law' Ch. 64 P.L. 1971 SLEPA Planning Office Criminal Justice SLEPA Detection, Apprehension and Conviction of Criminals Fmerqency Medical Service Training Fire Department . Relocation Assistance Grant Gront from Stole New Jersey Storm Damage State Health Aid Sanitarian Trainee '. SLFPA Traffic Safety Prolect ..' .. State Health Aid Sickle Cell Anemia Program U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Comprehensive Planning and Management Program State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act of 1972 Anticipated 1973 - 500,000.00 1972 500,000.00 Realized In Cash In 1972 ( 500.000.00 500.COO.OO $ 500,000.00 $ 500,000.00 S 92,600.00 93,000.00 $ 92,656.00 32,300.00 33,000.00 32,333.50 45,100.00 33,000.00 48,943.25 18,600.00 21,100.00 19,470.35 220,000.00 164,500.00 245,436 00 800.00 1,100.00 931.00 19,316.00 19,316.00 19,316.00 ' . 45,000.00 38,000.00 45,995.93 94,000.00 100,000 00 " 94,489.20 ,' 10,000.00 14,000.00 10,857.39 -'481,215.64 429,706.24 481,501.39 2J3.997.09 . 203,111.16 .. . 223,097.09 10,967.53 1U95.32 11,695.32 1,895,903.00 1,895,903.00 ! 1,936,755.88 " 192,306.52 193,044.91 i 192,306.52 137,917.63 80,000.00 146,185.05 10,000.00 8,000.00 10,115.07 30,000.00 33,000.00 30,329.41 5,000.00 3,900.00 5,187.12 232,538.00 216,355.00 216,355.00 37,500.00 34,000.00 37,935.05 34,500.00 34,302.00 34,762.73 58,000.00 70,OPO.OO 58,172 45 . 59,702.25 61,212.13 62,384.00 48.25S.00 - 48,255.00 136,582.09 465,775.43 436,961.43 49,987.91 ' 41,512.98 42,268.06 403,005.00 403,005.00 403,005.00 33,323.00 33,347.00 . 11,967.00 11,967.00 5,800.00 - 5,800.00 12,200.00 6,100.00 - - . 27,000.00 27,000.00 6,360.00 , 3,914.30 , 8,811.00 . 1,000.00 ; . 164.55 63,000.00 6,453.00 Entitlement Periods: January 1, 1972 to June 30, 1972 . July 1, 1972 to December 31, 1972 , 310,883.00 298,322.00 GENERAL GOVERNMENT Governing Body Council Salaries and Wages .... Other Expenses Historical Commission Other Expenses , City Clerk's Office Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Elections Salaries and Wages .... Other Expenses Bureau of Vital Statistics salaries 4JQ(1. Wages .... Venee4Waae! "Salaries and Waoes Other Expenses Department of Low City Attorney Salaries ond Wages Other Expenses . Municipal Court Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Deportment of Administration City Manager's Office Other Expenses ... Division of Purchasing for 1973 for 1972 for 1972 By Emergency Resolution Total Expended 1972 Other Expenses Insurance Other Expenses Planning Commission Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Official City Plan Other Expenses Celebration of Public Events Anniversaries and Holidays, R.S. 40:48-5 Associated Veterans of Passaic Other Expenses et.... Meals on Wheels Program ' A307-4 .... Department of Finance .. Director of Finance Salaries and Wages Division of Treasury V Salaries ond Wages ......... Division of Assessment -Safarie ond Wages---.--.-';., Other Expenses Division of Tax Collection Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Audit Contract Division of Accounts Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Deportment of Public Works -Director of Public Works Salaries and Woges Division of Engineering Salaries and Wages ......... Other Expenses Division of Streets Other Expenses. Division of Sew-rs ond Drains Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Division of Refuse Collection Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Construction, Reconstruction, Repairs ond Maintenance With State Aid Salaries ond Wages I. Other Expenses.....!.... Division of Public Property Other Expenses .... Division of Parks and Shade Trees Salaries and Wages Other Expenses Street Lighting Other Expenses 136,000.00 Maintenance of Municipal Hosoital Property Used by Guidance Guild ot Possaic (Lease) Salaries ond Wages Olher Fxpenses Trunk Sewer . Other Expenses ........ Department' of Health, Recreation and Welfare Division of Healfh Salaries ond Woges ... - Other Expenses.. .... Board of Health Local Health Agency 28.000.00 $ 28,000.00 2400.00 2,000.00 300.00 500.00 53,329.71 , 52,198.07 10,100.00 9,000.00 5,000.00 2,000.00 46,745.00 7,300.00 14,751.17 18,288.59 4,100.00 4,150.00 538.05 " 510.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 37,911.43 36,057.00 4,200.00 4,350.00 62.840.73 59,345.87 25,200.00 35,600.00 17,229.36 15,133.88 2,200.00 2,100.00 ' 11,908.19 11,346.30 600.00 600.00 478,742.00 ( 480,459.00 1,392.60 1,200.00 1,100.00 700.00 6,000.00 8,000.00 2,000.00 ' ' 3,500.00 14,000.00 Y,200:00 ' 2,120.00 . 16,047.M , J5,041.69 ' 76,623.'21 -.j5 66,057.88 4,900.0tr '- 7,600.00 40,421.99 38,575.39 6,600.00 7,200.00 10,500.00 10,000.00 51.877.74 48,650.69 32,030.00 7,650.00 1,200.00 , 2,120.00 49,140.28 42.622.-99 1,700.00 2,170.00 303,313.03 303,112.05 84,740.00 51,100.00 47,914.93 45,901.30 31 ,469.00 24,964.00 10,357.15 9,868.24 480,850.00 480,850.00 1,178.13 7,979.82 22,000.00 , 22AM0.ttO1 -119,569.28 ''" 104,899.20 78400.00 86,925.00 206,536.54 218,392.7' 61,885.00 45400.00 1,000.00 for 1972 As Modified By Paid or All Transfers . Charged Reserved ' 1 : - $ 28400.00 $ 27,384.48 $ 615.52 1000.00 1,870.03 129.97 500.00 337.91 162.09 52,198.07 51,844.28 353.79 9,700.00 9,514.54 185.46 2,000.00 1,875.00 125.00 8,100.00 7,906.15 193.85 . 18,288.59 18,069.89 218.70 4,150.00 3,189.14 960.86 510.00 461.52 48.48 3,000.00 2,264.04 735.96 . 36,211.42 36,211.42 5,200.00 . 4,893.84 304.15 59,345.87 58,344.99 1,000 .8 ' 35,600.00 25,722.06 9,877.94 15,608.42 15,445.34 163.01 2,200.00 1,896.98 303.02 11,374.20 11,374.20 600.00 511.54 18.46 " 490,459.00 . 487,316.60 " 3,142.40 . 1,259.83 1,259.83 950.00 883.50 66.50 8,000.00 ,000.00 12,500.00 ,18,000.00 13,319.14 4,480.86 300,319.47 180,617.17 19,100.00 Board of Health Salaries and Wages . Other Expenses Health Aid Services Salaries and Wages 'i : ' 22,313.63 34,161.37 125,000.00 7,06013 13,375.00 230,625.37 183,592.72 19,450.00 26,984.14 34,227.99 4,992.00 Please Turn to Page 15, Col. 1 4 ' - 1120.04 ' 120.04 15,073.24 15,073.24 -S6.057.tt ..- 65,91(1.55 ' 147.63 7,600.00 5,851.98 ' v 1,748.02 38,575.39 38,371.60 203.79 7,800.00 7,535.70 264.30 10,000.00 10,000.00 48,650.69 48,535.81 114,88 7,650 4,370.49 1,279.51 .Z120.04 ' 2,120.04 42,622.99 42,052.56 570.43 2,170.00 1,070.13 1,099.87' 303,112.05 290,544.68 1 2,567.37 64,100.00 . 45,702.39 18,397.61 53,801.30 53,666.25 135.0) 24,964.00 4,574.74 20,389.26 10,168.24 .10,107.96 60.28 481,650.00 480,855.03 794.97 i 7,97982 7,979.82 ,22400.00 2JE5lS-i 105,899.20 105,718.88 180.32 86,925.00 72,127.81 14,797.19 218.392.71 21M28.57 S.964.14 45,800.00 43,863.00 1,937.00 134,300.00 122,954.93 11,345.07 e' 7,060.13 6,044.14 1,015 99 13,375.00 12,823.22 ' 551.78 230,625.37 230,625.37 183.592.72 175,821 46 7,771,56 19,450.00 17,532.35 1,917.65 26,984.14 23,577,80 J,4(l 34 ' 34,227.99 30,284.23 3,943.76 4,992.09 4,992.00 r -r -t" A' 4J 4lik,

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