The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on July 28, 1952 · Page 2
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July 28, 1952

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, July 28, 1952
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Page 2
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TWO BT/TTHETTLLB (ARK.) COTTRIKK TTKWf WOWBAT, M, IMf What's This? No One Knows How to Call Constitutional Convention for U. S. WASHINGTON (/T) — Seventeen i adopted under one constitutional ttal*s have asked that a national procedure.: They werejjrojiosed^by convention be called to amen* the Constitution — but no one knows how to go about It. Legal experts for the House Judiciary Committee reported today, after Intensive research, (.hat nobody Xnows how to put on a constitutional convention, and urged Congress to consider legislation clearing up the question. * All 21 amendments have been Congress and ratified by three fourths of the states. The Constitution also provide* that Congress must call an amending convention upon petition of two thirds of Lse, slate legislatures—32 at, present. Method Never Used This method has never been used. Butn o\v several states have proposed It In petitioning for an Feel Broiled? Well, Cow Creek In Death Valley Is Much Hotter By The AMioclatfd Pres« If thts summer's steam-bath weather has left you feeling like a broiled lobster, here's a vacation travel tip: Steer clear of Cow Creek, in Death Valley. Calif. It's the nation's Girl Is Killed In Quick Move To Save Friend hottest spot. Nobody lives at Cow Creek, a weather station 15! feet below sea levcL But at Greenland Ranch In the heart of Death Valley, only 20 miles away, ft nine-man crew of Pacific Coast Borax Company em- ployes work the. year 'round. Charles A. Scholl. crew superintendent recalls that last summer'* high was only 126-degrees. He remembers It hit 132 in 1031. amendment that would restrict Congress' taxing authority to 25 per cent of incomes, except during a national emergency. Records show that Congress has received 32 petitions from 27 slates the tax problem. Tn addition Texas and Louisiana have passed resolutions but have not forwarder them to Congress. Six states Inter cancelled their petitions by other resolutions—Alabama, Arkansas. Illinois. Kentucky Rhode Island and Wisconsin. experts said the law is silent hu they thought states should be al lowed to change their minds. Maryland's petition was approvei only by the House of Delegates. | The experl* expressed belief both houses should agree In a petition before this constitutes action by a legislature within the meaning of the Constitution. The governors of Montana and Pennsylvania vetoed tax petitions passed by their legislatures. The Constitution wa.i no help, so the experts suggested that the petitions should be considered valid anyway, on the basis of available precedent. Humble Thousands Pay Grieving Homage To Eva Peron, Powerful Blonde Politician BUENOS AIRES, Argentina <VP)~ Argentina's humble thousands paid {hevlng homage today lo Eva Peron, llicy waited four abreast in milR-long queues lor a 20-second walk pant the bier nf their President's wife and political partner, who died Saturday night after a long Illness. endless procession throughout 6,000,000-memher General Labor the night and morning. Peron spent much of Sunday beside the casket and personally arranged the placement of the bier. After a private funeral Mass, attended only by government ministers nnd Intimate friends, he ordered the restless crowds admitted. 30's was generally attributed to cancer although there had been nn official anonunccment of the nature of her Illness. The blonde wife of President Juan D Peron lay In state In the hall of the Labor Ministry. In a glass-lopped casket of mahogany draped in white orchids, awaiting a full military funeral tomorrow afternoon. Tons of llltrrs. roses and carnations packed the hall and overflowed Into the streets outaide. Crowd* Continue Crowds of somberly dressed, so- ber-fnced mourners were first admitted to trio Improvised chapel Sunday afternoon Find continued in Mrs. Peron's death In her early [ They had shouted to pee Ihe body. ml once broke a police cordon to get closer to the entrance. The mournful viewing of the body WFW accompanied by an un-i expected traRedy. Gen. Juan Kste- baii Vacca, director of the Army's Superior School, suffered a heart attack while visiting the bier last night. He died shortly after, Peron's decision still was awaited on his wife's permanent burial place. Two suggested sites are the new headquarters of the mult^mil- llon dollar social foundation which she headed,, or In a great national monument built for her. Temporary Interment, at her own request, will he In the hall ol the night-long vigil In the ram. Women wept openly, iome in & state of near collapse. On Sunday all flags were dlpp«d to half staff. Buildlgs and lamppo«ts throughout the nation were draped in black. Confederation (CGT>. She wa* the unofficial head of the COT, and her following among Jts members made her the nation's most potent political .force after Peron himself, The slim beauty was regarded as the most powerful woman in politics in the world. Chiefs Decree Funtral The nation's military chiefs decreed her a funeral hitherto reserved for Presidents who died in office. Two days of national grief and 30 days of official mourning were declared. The CGT promised a perpetual guard, floral offerings and a symbolic flame always at her tomb. Unprecedented mourning by Argentina's masses—who called her Evita (Little Eva) and looked upon her as a Cinderella who had risen from their own ranks to height* of glory—beRim the Instant her death was announced, As church belh slowly knelled, vast crowds knelt in The first TJ. S. electric train was built by Prof. Charles Graf ton Page, of the Smithsonian Institution In 1651. Stars In Italy ROME (JT) —Linda Darnell. Flynn nnd Tom Ne»l ar« amonf Hollywood names dm In Rome thU •ummer for lllm appearancw. Gregory Pecfc t» already her*, working for William Wyler In Paramount's "Roman Holiday". Wynn In September will begin ihootlnj "The Ninth Man," a color Him budgeted at »!.100,000. WE MEET ALL PRICES WHOLESALE OR RETAIL vHOT or COLD! A Slice or Trucklood! SPECIAL PRICES FOR PICNICS AND PARTIES BLYTHEVILLE CURB MARKET Main Street Blythevill* NEW YORK M") — Alice Bellber, 18. and Louis Martinez. 17, ycstflr- j day went to the root of the Marie; Antoinette Hotel to take pictures. Alice lived at the hotel with her parents. Martinez, a 200-pounder .climbed on a skylight over nn slrshafl lo pose for a snapshot. The glass broke under hl« weight, but he caught hold of the frame a« he fell. , Willie the girl's father and (wo other men tried to lilt Martinez to jafety, Miis Bellber ran to a tloor below to a scaffolding In the atr- thaft. Then the boy's grip failed. She seized his legs as he fell and was puHed down the seven-story air- shaft. Their bodies struck a water pine, and water cascaded Into the pit. Miss Bellber struck the bottom lirst, dying almost Instantly. But her body broke the Impact of the youth's fall. He was taken to a hospital in critical condition with multiple fractures and Internal Injuries. | Consequently, the reported that | 20 states appeared to have valid pc- CO, CreeVs average daytime hlrti i "jj™° " ^™»«*£* '££. Kansas, Maine. Michigan, Mississippi. Nebraska. New Hamoshire. New Jersey. New Mexico. Pennsylvania. Utah. Virginia. Wyoming, Nevada, Montana and Massachusetts. Confess Petitioned Of these, the last three petitioned Congress to propose trip, constitutional amendment Itself. That leaves n states asking for a ron- stiiutlonal convention, the experts said. But no one knows how to go nhoilt calllne one. or what to do after one Is called Experts said the constitutional clause Is worded so generally thai it does not arvy how a convention should be called, who should he dr-lcuKtes, what, subteds It slioul consider or how long it should remain in session. The report contained a samp! bill Intended to Iron nut these an numerous other questions and pro poted that It be considered at tin next congressional session. in July last year was 117 degrees. It cooled off to an average of B9 at night and the overall average for the month was 103.5. The readings are token by National Park rangers who come down weekl.y from 2,300-foot hlRh Emigrant Pass. Greenland Ranch has 32 acres to dates and 20 acres of nlfnlla and a nine hole golf course adjacent to Purnnce Creek Inn. a winter spa operated by Pacific Coast Borax. The course gels little. If any, play between May 1 and Oct. 15. Low humidity, usually less thr-.r. 10 per cent, makes the heat bearable on the Californla-Nev.ida-Ari- zona desert. Virtually every business building, store home and house I trailer has an air conditioning sys- | tern or \rnit of some sort. Some j thoughtful persons even Install 1 small units for their doRS, cats and is. But for year 'round damp heal, you can't beat Tavernier, Fla 50 Norway to Get Prunes LONG BEACH. Calif. f/P) — Two ships, the Abraham Lincoln and the Bataan, will carry 464.000 boxes of prunes to Norway. The Norwegians financed the prune purchase by selling furs I ~ ---i--^. tries the» .tV^}* 11 to dollAf-.'.fc'ft Read Courier Ne i GlaAsiMed Ads miles south of Miami In the Florida Keys. Its annual average temperature of 77.2 is the highest in the nation. Tavernier, with a population of 500. probably is the Northern Hemisphere's nearest approach to the climate of the South Sea Islands. The city has never had frost; the temperature never has reached 100. Us residents wear mid-summer clothing nil year. Coconut palms, hibiscus, bougalnvlllea and other tropical plants grow Irnm the thin soil nnd limestone. This damp heat also prevails at times during the summer months 'along the dulf Coast ns Wllmlng- ~\tm. N. C. It's at these times that (he steaming residents will tell 5'ou: "It Isn't the heat as much as the humidity." Britain to Cut- Tobacco Buying LONDON I/T) — Britain will drastically Its tobacco purchase from the United States and Canad this year to less than half the nor mal Import, tobacco solirce.i today. These sources, connected with th tobacco Import trade, said the In diistry here has been warned th the government will release dolla to purchase only 4ft million poun of the 1852 American crop, «>n p»rfrl ', with 100 million .poun & iff' >m how a fatal accident can destroy /i' 1 Ni i / j futur *^ Realizing that the tragedy of a death is awful enough, we feel you should also understand what might happen to you as the responsible driver in a fatal accident. A lawsuit by I he survivors can wreck your whole life. Settlement of damages of $25,000 or $:>(),000 or SI 00,000 can tnl;e your possessions and your earnings for the balance of your life. What should you do? Investigate your present insurance and see if you fcave maximum liability protection. Buy the limit—the small extra cost may save your whole future. Our staff is ready In discuss your automobile insurance at your earliest convenience. tSTSs! INSURANCE DEPARTMENT — G. II. ROBSON, Manager THE FARMERS D A Ml/& TRUST D AN l\ COMPANY The Oldest Bank In Mississippi County "TIME TRIED — PANIC TESTED" F.D.I.C.—510,000 Each Deposit Member Fedrral Reserve SysUra Starts Tomorrow at Wade Furniture Co.! I SAVE The Savings Are Simply Enormous During Wade's Outdoor Furn. Sale Regular $57.95 Cast Iron Umbrella TABLE & 2 CHAIRS $1485 Reg. 61.85 Now '41' 5 PC. CAST IRON LAWN SET $n Reg. $139.50 Now fl >95 MIS- Extra Heavy Folding YACHT CHAIR Lawn Umbrella Reg. 32,50 22.50 Upholstered Choir Reg. 24.95 17.95 Canvas Reclining CHAIR S2.05 1.95 Metal TABLE Reg. S:!.!lfi S 2.59 Reg. $8.95 Now 5 (-95 Umbrella Tabl« Reg. 13.30 8.95 EASY TERMS! Ration Peel Cane SETTEE $4 Reg. $19.95 Now | TUB CHAIR < Reg. $7.25 Now LAMP TABLES ?/ Reg. $10.95 C i u! Reg. $19.95 Metal GLIDER----$13.95 GliderChair--$ 8.95 Metal Settee - $12.95 Metal Folding TABLE Reg. 125 Upholstered GLIDER Reg. $49.95 . Now 5 34' Metal PORCH SWINGS SQ95 Oak PORCH SWINGS $Q95 Comfortable CHAISE LOUNGE 5 n 9 Reg. $19.95 Now | J "Trade with Wade and Save" WADE CO.

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