The Brooklyn Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York on August 16, 1937 · Page 3
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The Brooklyn Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York · Page 3

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Brooklyn, New York
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Monday, August 16, 1937
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Page 3
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w rot L.u. BhOOkiAN DAILY EAGLE. MONDAY, AUGUST 16, 1937 Tetephon MAin 4-6000 Dewey to Hit at Brooklyn Rackets in His Drive for Nomination , Mayor to Map Vigorous Fight ForG.O-P.S ate Alliance Between Underworld and Politics to Be Prosecutor's Main Issue Continued from Pare 1 Guardia faction and the group opposed to the Mayor now appears beyond hope ot repair In the primaries. A majority of the district leaders now Is committed to support the Mayor for renominatlon. On the other hand, a strong minority faction ot leaders has gone over to Senator Roya! 8. Copeland, the Tammany designee for Mayor, and Is determined to carry the Brooklyn primary in his behalf. Mayor and Dewey Confer Dewey spent 45 minutes in conferences this afternoon with Mayor LaGuardia in City Hall. He would make no announcement of the outcome of his talk with the Mayor and Indicated that anything to be said concerning their meetings would have to come from the irfayor himself. Dewey said he would take a two Weeks' vacation on a schooner belonging to a friend and did not expect to keep in touch with political developments during his absence. The Mayor and Dewey were photographed together. Meanwhile, Charles O. Bond, taking over management of the Republican primary campaign in Brooklyn for Senator Copeland, in whose favor he withdrew his own candidacy, announced that opposition leaders and coleaders would be named in every Republican district where the present chieftains were committed to support Mayor LaGuardia for renominatlon in the primaries. Petitions Attacked The petitions designating Mayor LaGuardia to run in the Republican primary were attacked in the Board of Elections by S. J. Beckerman, a Copeland supporter. Beckerman told the Board of Elections the petitions were defective. Signatures originally written in pencil were traced over with ink, he said. He registered a number of other objections. Subsequently Beckerman telephoned The Eagle and said that a woman Republican's name appeared as the subscribing witness to 1,500 signatures from the 6th A. D. He said the dates indicated all the signatures had been obtained In four days. "As an expert, I say It is impossible for any one individual to db-taln more than 35 legitimate signatures in a single day," he said, Hastings Hits cfcarfe Taking a slap at Dewey's charge that al alliance has existed between the underworld and certain elements of Tammany Hall, Assistant District Attorney Harold W. Hastings, Tammany designee against Dewey, said: "I know of no such alliance. It Is part of Dewey's Job to get to the bottom of such an alliance and to prosecute. If he knows anything which he has not revealed, then he is not a prosecutor, but a politician." Hastings announced that Former District Attorney Joab Banton would be his campaign manager. Thus far, except for his declaration that he would accept the Republican nomination if It came to him. the Mayor has made no statement. Before Dewey himself agreed to enter the campaign, however, it is believed he received assurances that the Mayor would make a real fight to prevent the G. O. P. nomination for Mayor from going to Senator Copeland almost by default. Labor Backs Dewey Meanwhile, Dewey himself was assured of American Labor Party support, despite some feeling of hostility toward his investigation by a number of union labor leaders. "Labor has everything to gain and nothing to lose from honest and efficient, law enforcement," said Alex Rose, executive secretary of the American Labor Party. "Mr. Dewey's acceptance of the candidacy for District Attorney of New York County will, following his election, infuse this office with dignity and dynamic zeal, and will effectively destroy the link which exists be tween Tammany Hall and the un derworld." seam. (Mitint m Pffr -fit - 7 n If -4 ll.ru v r r At Ty! Ttn hi 1 if MMEIS NEVER GET ON YOUR NERVES Cracker Turns Deserted Child's Tears to V I I I, r - nr I 1 i . . v J-J r ) x t . y -M ill T U"t) I i 'r;-:-:'--3.rJ?f1? f-??"--' :--mr? 1 ' f 'fort I Anna Losecco, all of 8 months old and formerly of 186 India St., having the time of her young life In the Copeland Hits Choice of Black Continue! from Page 1 a session ot the Senate tomorrow. At that time the question of Mr. Black's nomination to the Supreme Court will be considered. I wish to be there in order that I may express my opposition to his elevation to the bench. "Simply stated my position is this: Religious and social freedom Is the fundamental principle of the Ameri can Government No man who is directly or Indirectly connected with the Ku Klux Klan or was the beneficiary ot its sympathy or support is fit for a place in any Impartial tribunal and certainly not for a place on the Supreme Court bench. "I regard Senator Black's nomination as an insult to the American people." Senator Copeland issued the. statement after having discussed Senator. Black's nomination briefly in a press interview at which he stated that while he believed in "Senatorial courtesy," Senator Black was not at present under consideration as a member of the United States Senate but as a nominee to the Supreme Court. In the interview he gave a preliminary hint that he would make a statement on the floor of the Senate. Curry With Copeland Ex-Tammany Leader John F. Curry appeared at the headquarters of Senator Copeland when the Tam many designee for Mayor conferred with Prank J. Prial, his running mate for Controller, and Borough President Samuel Levy of Manhattan, the designee on the Tammany ticket for Council President. Curry stood at his side during the Interview at which the appointment of ex-Judge Alfred J. Talley of the Court of General Sessions as chairman of the Democratic Copeland -Prial-Levy campaign committee was announced. "The fact that former Governor Smith, Mr. Curry and former Judge Talley are interested in my campaign," Copeland said, "is a very Important thing." Curry himself said: "Well, I was always interested in my friend. Prank Prial, particularly last year." Prial, after a strong race, was defeated in the 1936 Democratic primary when he opposed the nomination of Aldermanic President William F. Brunner. WiU Reply to Dewey Senator Copeland, reserving a direct reply to Special Prosecutor Dewey's charge that a long standing 0f -ANDPlSNTOFirf BOB BULLOCK (wearing the dark helmet) is recognized as one of the great No. 3's of polo. Polo enthusiast- 'will agree with Bob Bullock when he says that playing polo takes healtRy nerves. He says: "1 ve smoked Camels for close to 20 years. They're certainly made to order for steady smokers. Camels never jangle my nerves." Camels are made from finer, mart expensive tobaccos. Brooklyn Nursery and Infants Home to which she was brought by Mrs. Caroline Newman of 165 India Eloper Loses Bride, Tells Paper; j Calls Another and Takes Pdison Last week a heartbroken young man came to The Eagle offices with his wife's photograph. He told a rewrite man that she had vanished from the home they had established only a few weeks ago. Last night he telephoned another newspaper and announced he was going to commit suicide. Joe Kiernan, a Brooklyn police headquarters reporter, got the message and sped to 551 4th St., the source of the call. Carmen Perci, 22, who on July 21 eloped with Catherine Tolan, 19, collapsed in his arms. He had taken poison. Carmen was rushed to Full Committee Approves Black Continued from Page I McCarran (D., Nev.), Burke (D., Neb.), Austin (R., VUand Steiwer (R., Ore.). Against the motion: Neely, Van Nuys (D., Ind.), Logan D., Ky.), Dieterich D IlD.McGill (D.,Kan ), Hatch D N. M.), Pittman (D., Nev.). Connalry (D., Texas), Hughes (D., Del.), Borah (R., Idaho) and Avshurst (D., Ariz.). Lineup on the Report Then Neely's motion for a favorable report was approved, 13 to 4, with the following lineup: For: Neely, McCarran, Van Nuys, alliance has existed between the underworld and certain elements of Tammany Hall, said: "I'll have a statement to make on that later. "I was in the fight for good government when Dewey was born. "Of course no one has a right to aspire to public office who does not believe public office is a public trust. No one has a monopoly on good government. That is basic." Copeland said that he and his colleagues on the Tammany ticket intended to discover why many business firms had left the Bronx, the home borough of Leader Edward J. Plynn, who is supporting the New Deal-Mahoney ticket in the city primaries. Before leaving for Washington. Senator Copeland indicated he would confer with Tammany Leader Christopher D. Sullivan. n. Y St. The girl's mother, Mrs. Newman explained, left little Anna with her three weeks ago and disappeared. Kings County Hospital where it was said he would recover. Carmen had written a note. TTo police and press: Thank you for all your aid. I love Catherine until death do us part." There were obstacles to their romance, Perci said on his visit to The Eagle. The girl's parents objected because he was of,Itallan and she of ish descent. Perci said he and his bride never quarrelled. He couldn't understand why she should leave home. And he said he couldn't go to their home to find out if she was there. "I never go there," he said as he put the picture down and walked o t. Logan, Dieterich, McGill, Hatch, Pittman, Corinally, O'Mahoney, Hughes, Borah and Ashurst. Against: King, Burke, Austin and Steiwer. Senator O'Mahoney, who was ab sent, voted by letter on the final motion. Senator Norris (Ind., Neb.), also absent, was not recorded on either motion. Just before the committee met Senator Burke (D., Neb.), had announced he would demand that Black be questioned about his qualifications. Burke, entering a closed meeting of the committee called to consider Black's nomination, said he would ask that the Alabaman be quizzed either today or tomorrow about his views on judicial review. Senator Austin (R., Vt.) said he would support Burke's demand. Both said they were not concerned with reports that Black once had run with Ku Klux Klan support. Senator McCarran (D., Nev.) also indicated, as he entered the committee session, that he would vote for hearings. He said he would support the move if any Senator started it. 3000.00 n in the 6th Children's . National Photograph Contest Just have your child's photograph taken in our Jean Sardou Studio for as little as 1 PRIZE Awsrdsd by Parents' Magasin. 500.00 CONTEST r SPECIALO Mo Appointment lUqulrsd LOESER'S Anna Is shown crying (left) with some alarm, puzzled (center) between tears and laughter when presented Alienists Called In Wife Slaying Continued from Page 1 murder him. I wanted to cut his head off. My wife tried to have me committeed to Kings County Hospital but I pleaded with her. I am very religious. I have 500 books on religion." He paused, smiling, and then said grimly: "Your Honor, do we a favor. Cut me up in pieces or put me in the electric chair." He broke into tears, he said, when he struck his wife with a hammer and heard her skull crack. "I knew It was that because I used to crack skulls of deer at the museum," he said. He was employed as a taxidermist at the museum. To Be Examined in Cell At the request of Dr. Philip I. Nah, medical assistant to the prosecutor, and with the consent of Assistant District Attorney William E. McCarthy, Cortese was remanded to Jail for a further hearing Wednes day so that alienists might examine him. meanwhile Earlier in the day he showed complete bewilderment when questioned briefly at the police lineup In Manhattan. "Are you employed?" asked Acting Capt. Samuel Mooney. Cortese replied with a mumbled "yes." "Married?". "For 10 years I worked steady," Cortese answered that one. "Steady like anything. Then I was laid off. I lost my job, I fell on the back of my head. I said to Sarah, I said . . ." His voice trailed off and he was led out of the room. Child Sees Slaying Cortese has been on relief the last four months. When he arose at 7 a.m. yesterday he picked up a hammer in the kitchen and went to the bedroom where his wife was sleeping with their 5V4-year-old daughter, Antoinette. He cash prizes- 8x10 pictursi ol your child ia soft opal finish . . . ons HAND COLORED IN OILS 249 lean Sardou Studio . Filth Floor Smiles with a big cracker, and (right) grinning as she realizes that all's well with her world. (Eagle Staff photo.) fractured his wife's skull by several blows of the hammer and she never recovered consciousness. Little Antoinette was awakened by the murderous attack and cried out: "Father, what are you doing?" Cortese left the house and went to the home of his sister, Mrs. Frances Backman of 68 Bay 32d St., and told her what he had done. Then he went to church and confessed to a priest. He was on his way to the station house, he said, when two radio patrolmen, warned by neighbors, picked him up at Avenue T and W. 10th St. In his pockets detectives found a message he had written for his brother In Puerto Rico, asking him to "please rush to New York because I am getting very sick." Besides Antoinette there are three other children Henry, 10; Anthony, 8, and 8alvatore, 8 months. Police Upheld In Robins Riots Continued from Page 1 Wggner Act rather than the State law, and the so-called questions to which you refer are pending before the National Labor Relations Board. "Under these circumstances and since such matters have long been taken out of the hands of the employers and left wholly to the employes themselves it seems that a conference on the part of the employers with your board would only complicate the situation and serve no useful purpose."' The telegram was signed with the name of the company. A company spokesman explained the company does not consider the industrial union as representing its employes and that it further takes the position that it has no strike at its plant. MONTR'ERLER Departs from Penna. Station every night at 9:10 P.M. (Eastern Standard Time) for Montreal, Ottawa, Quebecl Join a brilliant society in the compartment lounge car or the diner . . . Indulge in the luxury ol a private bedroom . . . Relax in comfortable section or compartment berth . . . Wake up next morning refreshed and rested in Montreal. The fares are: $3.45 in coaches; Pullman including lower berth $14.55 one way; $27.45 round trip summer excursion. For reservations: Phorm Penn-ylvama 6-2000. Tickt and Pullman reservations at Penna. Station, Canadian Nat'I Rail-waye, 673 Filth Ave., or Con-eolidated Ticket Olticei, 17 John St., N. Y., lbi Pierrepont St., Brooklyn. Strikers Balk Move To Reopen Factory Mantreal, Aug. 16 U.R More than 1.000 striking textile workers, armed with clubs and stones, prevented the reopening today of the Dominion Textile Company's Hockelaga plant. The company attempted to transport 150 workers, escorted by moto- liuL,"?ll?ZintM P01'"1 mt0 The strikers, many of them women, crowded in front of the gate and refused to let the trucks pass. At the company's Mount Royal plant a mounted policeman was dragged from his horse by strikers. NLRB Opens Weirton Case Board Refuse Firm's ! ( Request for Delay Of j 'Terrorism' Hearing New Cumberland, W. Vs., Aug. 18 UP) The National Labor Relations Board today refused a company request for postponement and opened its hearing on charges that the Weirton Steel Company used "terrorism" to oppose the steel workers organizing committee. Attorney William Z. Fay, counsel for the company, asked the delay for further investigation of the union's charges. More than 200 husky men of the mills crowding into the vine-covered court house, heard John W. Porter, board attorney, declare that: Weirton Steel, largest unit In the National Steel Corporation headed by Ernest T. Weir, had dominated its employes. The company fostered and maintained two employe organizations. The company discriminated against some employes. Edward Grandison Smith of Clarksburg, W. Va., president of the governors of West Virginia University, presided as trial examiner. Smith overruled a motion by At torney Clyde A. Armstrong, for the company, to exclude from the record reports of National Steel by which the board proposed to show that the steel company was engaged In Inter state commerce. "Now is not the time for the respondent to submit its case," commented Smith. The company in its denial of the charges last week declared the board did not have jurisdiction because Weirton Steel was not in an Interstate business. Keep Cool With BgSBgSa&, THE ALL-PULLMAN LtMlTED to OUtnezn Every comfort nd J""" modern tren.continental EXTRA. FARE. Maid, hairdresser-barber with radio, buifet-soda lountam-duung daily 10:15 p. m. Central Standard Tun.-ThepopularLosAngelesLimitedisoneot . . A Famous Fleet of Trains M 1 completely air-conditioned SAN FRANCISCO OVERLAND LIMITED Chicgo-Sn Francisco PORTLAND ROSE 5nicago.Portl.ad.T.orna.S..ttl.Spok.n. . n-i i i MITED Kftwiny Chicago-Loi Angsle i-Dan r THE FORTY-NINER I Vol 42 -Ch.c.go to S.n Tr.nci.co extra irt. NOBTH WKSTtBN Phone LOniecre .-! ROUTS' Of THi SBBBBBBBI Spanish Rebels Lose 1,000 in 2V2-Mile Push Hand.to - Hand Battle on Santander Front-Italy Hit by Ship Survivors Madrid. Aug. 1( U.R) Sanguinary hand-to-hand fighting along the Santander front tu reported in messages here today. Rebel forces, it was said, lost mors than a thousand men m a two and a half mile advance. Gibraltar, Aug. 18 (U. Italy wa accused by survivors today of sink '"V"! . .f?? Z?1 taiiu waging uiiicslucIiCU KUIBig against neutral ships suspected of carrying contraband to the Loyalists. Three survivors of the Spanish, tanker Campeaador, torpedoed last Wednesday, were questioned here by naval authorities. They said the tanker was attacked and snk by the Italian destroyer Saetta. . One American and 37 German members of the crew of the oil tanker George W. MjKnight, registered in Panama and believed to belong to an English company, arrived at Bizerta, Tunis, aboard the, British steamer Commodore. The men were picked up after the tanker was torpedoed and burned Saturday while passing near the Island of Pantelleria. The crew said their ship was attacked by a submarine-after being followed all day by an Italian destroyer marked "CO. Submarine Fires 19 Sheila Crew members reported that the -destroyer approached the George W. McKnight early Saturday and followed her all day, being joined later by two more destroyers. About 9 p.m. the destroyers veered away and a submarine rose near the tanker. Nineteen shells were fired. the last two causing an explosion, the crew said. The tanker soon was a mass of flames. The crew, with five wounded, took to lifeboats. Shortly afterward the Commodore picked up the men while the George W. McKnight drifted toward Cape Bon. -- -Por(land.T.co.-stti. rouw- I'MON rMCiriC RAILROAD Room Ml. Ml '! KY. er Phent Ml'rrej -44.V York. N. V. 1 in e IB RAILROAD

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