The Brooklyn Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York on August 17, 1940 · Page 15
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The Brooklyn Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York · Page 15

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Saturday, August 17, 1940
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6 1 I rV . X : II Itl V-, J M . "7-7T V aiw. J - i t nnMMnri fciiiiAiiriiiiirTiiii'TiriTtiiirrtirtuwiirr riifr ttiiir-n f-m'-' " a m imihiiji 'ri il ft ijM&Ba itil j Huge Dry Dock Moved To Staten Island Pier j Temporary Transfer Made to Permit the i Dredging of Slip at Morse's Shipyards j ! Or.e of the largest drydoeks in the world was towed yes-; terd.iv from the Bethlehem Steel Company's Morse plant at! the loot of 50th St. to Pier 7, Tomokinsville, to permit dredg-l mir of the .slip it has occupied there. The drydock 700 feet1 Ion? and 140 leet wide attracted the attention of commuters on the fiOth St. and 39th St. ferry lines, as well as autoist.s in;ikii;: r.sp of the new belt hi-h- HT1 BROOKLYN EAGLE BAY RIDGE HOME TALK SATURDAY, AUG. 17, 1940 TY.e try cook leached its r.Hia without, mishap yotii-:ti'nioon, it was stated by a way. of J-l.-' rii-n.ar. lor t'.;e company. It w,i.N fsplaiiifd that it was thp f ii -1. u:r.c m 10 years th.at the dry din i; 1...,; bren ir.ovod from it., be;'.;; : tli punvp of drodaing the .-:.:. Tl;:.s :ry dotk. su cordir.? to the compa;.;. s sviko?nian will remain at tin1 Staten I.-air.d pier for several dus. Gabe Made Fans Gab by His Fine Ball Playing Merchants Continue Fight Against Skyway Plan to Carry on Battle Despite Fact Some Buildings Have Been Razed Preparatory to Link NO PUSH-BUTTON PERIODS AT SUMMER PLAY SCHOOL 124 Many of the joys of inventing games such as their grandparents may have known are now possible for the children of the present generation. At least that is so at Summer Play School 124. Above is a youngster playing policeman. It's Ernest Friedow, one of the pupils at the school. He's engaged in a constructive program, that of giving directions to pedestrians as to the proper and safe methods of crossing a street or avenue. Then, too, there are Mary Squire and Anna Mammone who are busy at the toy shop. They are really serious at their work, but they are having a wonderful time. No Mechanical Toys Found Bicyclist Plus At This Summer Play School Wouldn't Take Chances on Poison . p MeGee. 23. of 4400 4-.h decided no; to tak:"1 any s of poisoning when lie Instructors at P. S. 1 24 Unit Instead Stress Joy of Inventing Own Games By MARGARET MARA Pity the children of this push-button period who don't know how to play! Mechanical toys to be wound on a spring and many other ready-to-hand playthings have robbed today's youngsters of many of the joys of Inventing games which their parents and grandparents knew That is exactly -what the Board of Education in New York City has come to realize, obviously, for the program at the Summer Play School at P. S. 124, 14th St. and 4th Ave., has reverted to teaching the children how to play store and play theater and play farm. On a tour of the classrooms under the guidance of the principal, Miss Elizabeth Northrop, your reporter came upon the happiest groups of children that she had seen within lour walls anywhere. There are 15 teachers in the chool and upward of 200 pupils dally have registered for the classes. Boys and girls from 4 to 12 take part In the Indoor program and outdoor games in the playground under Richard Kennedy, director accepts boys and girls up to 16 years. Selecting the Project On the first day of the school session, which started in July, the children were invited to select a project that interested them most. The art class was immediately a popular request as it was found that there were many artistically gifted children among the children of Italian born parents in the school , district. There Is the community class, which has organized quite a complete setup for the business life of a neighborhood. The pupils, through one part guidance by the teacher and two parts initiative, settled on building a community similar to the one in the vicinity of 14th St. and 4th Ave. There are booths arranged around the room and each one represents an activity in business life. The pupils made all of the props used in the setting and each day they carry on actual business in the booths. 'Our Community' In this room "Our Community" operates. The postoffice station is "Station V," patterned after the postoffice station on 8th St. Stamps" are sold and "money orders," and "money" is deposited in the 'postal savings bank." The children learn all of the functions of the clerks at the windows in the postoffice. The community bank bears a r ign : " Williamsburgh Savings Bank," because the bank is a familiar landmark as seen from the vicinity of the school. Boys and girls proudly deposit "money" every day in th bank. They learn to make out deposit slips and yes-withdrawals, too. The little girls in the class favor the community store. They have named it "Roulston's," because ther is a Roulston store nearby on 4th Ave. Boys take turns acting as storekeepers, and the shelves in the store are impressively filled with empty boxes that once contained sugar, cereals, soap powders and cookies. There are clean empty cans still fragrant from coffee. The shoppers inquire carefully about prices and a little lady carefully considering her budget, purchased an empty egg box and noted the purchase in a small notebook. The "police station" is labeled "72d Precinct," for the real polire station, 575 5th Ave. The "police station" in the community project stresses safety on the city streets for children. "Traffic policemen" are treated with great respect by the class. The pupils decided that their community wouldn't be complete without a candy store, so they set it up. They named it "Ginsberg's Store," because "that's where we buy our candy down the block." Thespians Paradise The theater project is immeii.sely popular,, and the teachers have detected the influence of the movies here. It is the largest class in the play school. The pupils make costumes, masks and all properties. A puppet show is their prize display. The class is working at top speed these days, preparing for the pageant which will mark the close of the season. It will take place on Aug. 27 and will be entitled "Americans at Work." Farmer Comtassle One of the most Ingenious setups is found in the classroom which fostered the "back-to-the-farm movement" among the South Brooklyn boys and girls. This project apparently held greatest appeal for the smaller children. A miniature farm scene made of paper and painted to simulate earth and grass, is the base for adroitly constructed barns, silos and farm animals. In conjunction with the building of the set, the teacher took the pupils step by step through the activities of a farm. They learned about ploughing the land and planting of the feeds for the farm produce, the care of the cows and other farm animals and the use of the silo. Fact Versus Fiction The children knew where dairy products come from. But early in the season when the subject was new, the teacher asked the question: hand. He was called upon for the ' answer. j "Butter comes from tigers," he j announced triumphantly. j It took the teacher a little time j to figure out the origin of that misinformation. It seems that the j boy recently had heard the fanciful ' story of Little Bla:k Sambo. The teacher then remembered that in I this story "the tiger ran around j and around the tree so fast that ! he fell down and turned into ; butter." j Copv, Boy! i About 15 earnest youths were , busy at long tables in the "Press Room" project trying to get out ( the paper. They were concerned ! on that day, too, with finding a j name for the publication. ; They had made cutouts from linoleum and mounted them on blocks and were using them for i illustrating their sheet. i Ever)' morning the boys were asked to contribute to the "Idea i Box" which occupies a prominent place in the classroom. j They were curious when a real j reporter walked into the room, but j the reporter was deflated quickly j when she invited inquiries regard-1 ing a new.spaMr and the first I question was: "How do they make the funnies?" They've All Been Talking Despite the fact that wreckers are busy in both the lower and upper parts of 3d Ave., making ready for the extension About Way He Won of the belt highway from the Bay Ridge waterfront at the Saints' Game Himself Shore Drive to the approach to the Brooklyn-Battery tunnel, 'the Third Avenue Merchants and Property Owners Associa tion is determined that the discarded 3d Ave. "el" structure will not be u.sed as an auto skyway as a connecting link. "Everything legally possible will be done to prevent that shaky and uu'.v old structure from being used ! as an auto highway," H. R. L. Rohlfs, treasurer of the organization, and one of the charter mem bers of the organization, declared '.ast ni'ht: "We have heard of course," he said, "that the city plans to make use of the structure ; for a skyway, tut officially we can ' v.ni-ti rthirc from the authorities. 1 . . , : ; hiiu uMwpeciea lease ot active We were organized to :igni me pro posal, and we intend to fight it lo the last ditch.'' Mr. Rohlfs, who savs that a skyway on 3d Ave. would just about rum business and ' drive tenants from the thorough fare to other parts bec ause of gas ; and oil fumes and noise, thereby decreasing properly values, insists . c:cl that if the war toll on world that the city would save money shipping continues at, its present and there would be far less objec- j pace, even more windjammers will tions from property owners if the ; come back into active service from belt highway were extended down ! the scores and scores of piers where 1st or 2d Av'es. rather than 3d Ave. j they are moldering now. j Mr. Rohlfs maintains that under I The Star of .'inland has been pur. In the following letter a Bay Ridge resident who knows; tne prescnt plan the city would 1 chased by the south Pacific Trad-Col. William R. Jackson, formerly commanding officer of have to reinforce many of the "el " in? company of Manila, recon'd-- St. was riding a bicycle and couldn't j the Mth Regiment, whose armory is at 15th St. and 8th Ave.,1 pillars in many instances, declaring ; tioned, and soon will start on the I pays a tribute to that officer who after a physical examina-: that he had made a note of tne, first voyage of its new life, carrying fact that many ot mem naa sunn either lumber or grain. Or Ave., eha.i swallowed iodine in medicating his tooth and a.-ked for medical attention. The ambulance surgeon al-o was not going to take any chances either and carried Georite to lite Norwegian Hospital to be on the sale side. It was the unanimous opinion of t!y fans that Gabe Gabriel was ab:ut the whole shootin' match in the game of the Bay Ridse S.itnts acainst the Cubs, for they will tell you that lie single-handed virtually won the game for the Saints by 10 to 4 bv batting in seven runs with his triple and brace of two-bair-iws, in addition to making a leap into the air to pull down a line drive over second base and make a double play. Score by innings: R H. E Six,'! 3003010'! xlo J C .!, 0 ! 0 .' (U) o n -t 4 3 Handlebar Guest Hurt in Xrashf Youthful Wheelman Has Tough Luck and So Also Has His 'Passenger' Joseph Tomalulo. 13, of 1019 39th Retiring of Jackson Calls Forth Tribute Leaving of National Guard by the Former Commander of Mth Regt. Causes Regret Old Windjammer Gels New Lease On Life by War San Francisco (U P' The war. with its toll of shipping, has given a ne-. h'.i to the Star of Finland, one el the most famous and historic w.nd- ' jammers of the davs when wind jammers were the hfeblood of commerce. Many West Coast shippers ore- stop it in time to keep it from run ning into the rear of an automobile ; tion by a board of medical experts will retire from the serv-t vv, 4, i Hsu, ot h, 5f- ice with other officers as a result of those tests. fered abrasions of the back and left i leg and contusion of the head. He j was attended at the Norwegian Hospital. That would have ended the story of Joseph's adventures had it not been that he was giving a ride on the handlebars to Andrew Sciascia, one year younger, of 1037 40th St. This "passenger" suffered contusions of the right hand and abrasions of the right thigh, ako needing medical attention. Play and Learn "The children learn while they play," pointed out Miss Northrop, the principal. "The objectives of the elementary activity program are kept in mind while the children learn to live and work together harmoniously. The special talents of each child are brought out and critical thinking encouraged, and special attention is given to building the child's vocabulary." The children take "field trips," to museums, parks, banks, libraries, postoffices and other government functional departments, and a group from the "press room" visited the Brooklyn Eagle recently. The Slimmer Play School at P. S. 124 is the only play school in this section of Brooklyn. There are onlv ten in the Greater City. ; Girl Skater Hurt As Boy Trips Her I Dorothy Hayes, nine, of 330 58' h St., even at her advanced age U not i unduly convinced of the chivalry of the other sex. for .she was re-j moved to the Kings County Hos-; pital after being tripped by a boy i as she was skating on the street. Dr. Serlin of th? Norwegian Hospital thought she mUht have a fractured right foot and ordered her sent to the hospital for further examination. HAY THERE! HORSE BREAKS MONOTONY Donald Colli, 6 years old. of Ml 32d St. has the distinction of breaking in on the monotony of dog-bite records with an unusual happening. He was playing in the lots at 183-189 33d St. and there was bitten on the right arm by a horse. He was treated at the Norwegian Hospital. All the residents of Bay Ridge and Park Slope that have come in contact with Colonel Jackson through the years of his service with the South Brookyn regiment will agree with the estimate of his many admirable qualities set forth in this letter. Editor Buy Ridyc Section of tlir Euylc: No change in the National Guard of New York State will b? received with more regret than that affecting Col. William R. Jackson, formerly commander of the 14th Regiment. Colonel Jackson until several weeks ago was commander of the 14:h Regiment, which he had l?d since 1931. Recently he was transferred from the 14th to the command of the old 71st Regiment of Park Ave. and 34th St., Manhattan. In the nine ears in which Colonel Jackson was in command of '.lie 14th the regiment reached a degree of efficiency not surpassed in its long history, which antedated the Civil War. No ofifcer who commanded the 14th, either in peace or war. enjoyed the respect Rosary Shrine Will Hold Holy Hour for Peace Announcement has been received from the Rev. C. G. Moore. O.P., J.C.B., chaplain of the Rosary Shrine, Summit, N. J., that a solemn holy hour for "World Peace" and the rosary novena will take place tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. at the shrine, and Bay Ridge visitors will be welcome. The great career of the Dominican apostle of northern Europe, St. Hyacinth, will be briefly traced on Sunday. curing me counse cu a, , g.jt of a (he windjamm(f,s ,hat as one inch m the concrete. . may be nmed Further plans for the fight , that none will come back with such against the proposal will be made j a coiorlui and historic record as i at a meeting of the Association on tnat ol tne Star of Fm;and S Monday night. This meeting will ! i be held at Fairway Hall, 3d Ave. ; Bullt at B"th. Maine ' and 54th St. Businessmen of the ! It was originally built at Bath, avenue have been asKeci to oe at j wue, i years ago, as the Kaiu-the meeting at 8 o'clock to discuss l lani. It had been ordered by King ways and means of making the j Kalakua of Hawaii at a time when thoroughfare more attractive. he dreamed of an empire of South Nathan Margolis is president of the ; Sea Islands. The Kaiulani was to organization which recently was have been the flagship of his fleet incorporated, and Manual Price is j that would have enabled him to chairman of the board of directors. , rule his island empire from Hono- The first work in the construction IuIu-of the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel, But the dream faded and the the digging of two construction j king died, and the ship was sold to shafts is to start within a few days, j the Alaska Packers. With them it it has been announced. The shafts ; was renamed and became one of a will be in the triangle formed by j famous group if sister "Star" ships. Rapelye and Van Brunt Sus, and : The Star of Finland is the last sur-Hamilton Ave., directly north of vivor. the site to be occupied by one of; The star, of T, anH land sailed the scrap iron course to Japan the ventilation buildings. Mrs. Stevenson Firm For Women's Rights Devotion to This Principle Led to Resignation in Historic Stables Are On Way to Oblivion WPA Demolition Crews Removing the Last Portion of the Noted E. W. Bliss Estate Demolition crews of the WPA are removing the last landmark of the old Bliss estate, which was acquired some years ago by the city as part of Owl's Head Park, this being -undignified two-story brown sandstone stables of English design at the foot of a wooded bluff at 67th St. and Colonial Road, uilt in 1890, which once quartered 19 saddle and harness horses and seven draft horses. where after having car ried there a final cargo of scrap iron, they themselves were added to the heap. Tne Star of France is a pr:.vn hulk at Noumea in the French South Seas. Others were wrecked or became barges. 1 The Star of Finland will sail under the command of Capt. Harry Johnson, as square a rigged sa:ior 1929 of the First 9th G. O. P. Woman Co-Leader s the star is a square rigged ship. Johnson ran the blockade to Spain The 9th A. D. Republican Organization which will be' with aviaUon Ko'.me. well represented today at the Wendell L. Will tie acceptance shipper Happy Ajain efficiency 0f ' speech ceremonies at Elwood, Ind., has been distinguished; "it'll be good to go to sea again National Guard organizations, ; for its aggressive program since its inception. Not only have i the Finland," he said, "and it il reared their heads in the 14th while : the men in the local club been among the party s staunchest DP renei irom having tracer on. under the direction of Colonel rnemhers. hut. thp women members have hpen nutstnnriine- in lm Bouncing Republican county affairs. The first co-leader, Mrs. Beatrice V. Stevenson of 1316 85th St., was indeed the affection, of his men in a larger measure than did Colonel Jackson. No company disputes or internal feuds, which so often have mili tated against the The draft horses were stabled in ,he s.nlc,lure proved t0 be mti me ua.st nieiiL, wiine Trwt;uii,s emu carriages of the estate were stored and a blacksmith shop maintained. Where does butter come from?" ; The saddle and harness hor.-es had And one little fellow with an eager look on his fare raised his Household Implements' Bring Disaster to Two Youngsters Perhaps Herbert Callahan, 10 years of age, of 120 29th St., has come to the decision that young men like him should leave needle work to the girls. The conclusion would be only natural, for he was playing with a needle at his home when he stuck it accidentally into his right leg. lacerating it badly nough to call for treatment by Dr. their quarters on the ground floor, sheathed with yellow pine. A harness repair room was ali-o on the ground floor. The upper floor contained the head grooms apartment and a hay loft, the only unfinished section of the building The main doorway led to a balconied sun room. Markers and ornamental work bear the letters Ehouse of the Holy Family Hospital, i e. w. B. Another domestic implement closely allied to the needle also brought unhappiness to Richard Geroffin, 10 years old, of 426 48th St. He was playing in the rear yard of his home when he fell on a pair of scissors and cut his chest so severely that Dr. Finley of the Norwegian Hospital was called to attend him. Sections of the massive roof, cupola, ridges and exterior clocks were fabricated out of heavy sheet metal and treated with an oxide paint to give the effect of copjer. It is said that as much as $17,000 was offered by private interests not so long ago for thp metal scrap in the belief it was solid copper. Onlv the leaders, valleys and gutter of , extensively. this metal. The pitched parts ct the roof were laid with heavy ;la'c For the last five years the building has been used as a sto:.ii. house by the Department of Patk-WPA officials said the demolition will be completed in the next v. weeks, and it is the intention of Park Department to pave, ten an' and landscape the area by Oct. 1 The beautiful estate by :' ' waters of New York Bay, which . the center of many social events it: Brooklyn, was at first the home of the late Henry c. Murphy, editor : tlie Brooklyn Eagle, who was Minister to Holland. On his death tl: estate, which was just below the :? ! Ave. and 65th St. line and wi.it:: now comprises most of Ow l's H ' Park, became the propct'tv of tli late E. W. Bliss, who developed it Jackson. This state of harmony and co-operative consent by all the commissioned and non-commissioned members of the regiment was largely due to Colonel Jark-.. ni's reputation throughout the command of unfailing fairness and impartiality. The men all knew that his decisions were for the ben-el it of the organization and hence lit the country. In quitting the National Guard. Colonel Jackson will take with him :. it only the respect and esteem of ail his former officers and men but also tlie hi::h regard of the offi-c rs of the National Guard in other i : t'anizations with whom he has been associated in advancing the military interests of the State of Ne-.v York. Upon his record of serv-. '. both State and Federal, may well be inscribed in lefrrs of Jicht, 'W-'U done, Lcod and faithful s.erv-at.f .' Colonel J.u'kson's ni.li'.ny service ian a year belore th" prc-er.t it'll of the century. He stuted in field artillery, Itl whah he - tveri as private, corporal and scr-mt from January, 18JKI. to July. I.mT. He trat'terred to infan- in 1908 as a second l.t'ti't ::ant : March of that year. r:.z pro-::. 'cd to first la utettan in Nnvm- lets bouncing eff our gasoline drums." Tlie Star of Finland has had her : r and beconi:nur a coaip.i:;'-' cap-ta.n in 1903. He reached tlie erade of ma r in !'. fruary. 1917, holding t.i.r tank ;,:;'il July, when lie e::'ffid the Federal service in that gt'a.le in (..nection with World War .n'.ivi- H" remained in the F 'Serai rruce uivil August. 1319 Back ,:i the State e'-tabiishtin ::: . l;e :',, had the grade of l.c i'":. m; s'inel of 'he 1 1th in 13LV) .i:;i in Miy, 1931. became its coce; ONE WHO KNOWS HIM.- j Biy Rid -.c, Aug. 10, 1940. ' a militant for women's rights even in the days of the battle for suf- ! frage. It was Mrs. Stevenson's unswerving devotion to the cause of i women and their rights which ultimately caused her to resign as co-leader. It was in May 1929 that Mrs. Stevenson, then a member of the Republican State Committee as well as co-leader, resinned her past in the local organisation following a clash with Miss Sarah Schuyler Butler, vice chairman of the G. O. P. Slate Committee. Miss Butler who was the daughter of Nicholas Murray Butler. ' a:ue out at that time in supiort of the Sartent Bill, later signed by Governor Roosevelt, which provided that the Stat" Committees of both parties, be permitted to make their own rules rehtuu; to membership and tlie represent itio.'i of both sexes on committees. Mrs. Stevenson, on the othe hit lid, Mipjjiiried tlie Story Bill which proiKiseo that tnere shousi oe or. e man and one woman on the S'.a'e Committee from each determined unit of representation. Mrs Stevenson felt that the Sargent Bill tended to disregard the richts of women voters. The Stc.-rv Bill, she said, safeeuarded women's t.ehts for full representation in party councils. Or.e of tlie nA-t out-tar.ciii.c fivic workers :n Bav R:d.-e at or.e time, Mrs. Stevenson dropped o'lt o: public life short'. v affrr r'-.-i;n-ir.a the co-cucm-hip She was a p.oncer Red Cros worker having ;prver! ne: a u-sr stavs tightened, a new coat of pam nur.se m active service during the appdand now 0,,m 1700 n.orc Spanish-American War. Formerly tons of shipping to help fill the gap she headed the New York State of hundreds of thousands of tons that are being sunk. Nurses Association. She was chairman of the Advisory Board of the New York State Red Cross, and In Bay Ridge was active in behalf ol the city Health Station on 4fh Ave. at 52d St. Later she interested herself in the Bay Ridge Hospital, later known as the Victory Memorial Hospital. Mrs. Stevenson held office with company the 9th A. D. Suffrage Party .'or six vears. and when women were given the vote site was one of five women who organized the Women's Organization of tlie 9th As-em'o'.y District. Mrs. Marietta V:.i.--rwoo.l. !e::-' associated with Mrs. .Stevenson, at.d one of the five founders, succeeded her as co-It acer. Mrs. Trine Johnson is the incumber.'.. At whatever port the Star oi Finland will pick up its cargo. wl.:c;i probably will be Seattle, it will pick up a crew of Filipinos and then w;ll head for Australia. South Africa and other destinations. As a unit of the fleet of 23 windjammers once owned by the Alaska Packers it had continued down m active service until 1835. when the witched to steam vessels. Dog Takes Exception To Canvasser's Presence Mary Dougherty, 21, of 4"ii W. 54th S was canvassing at 8318 3d Ave. when a dog ran out of ;,n apartment as the door was opened and bit Ivr r.it'nl eye The int'ir;. was trea'ed by Dr. Finley of tho Norwegian Hospital. Says Corporal Punishment Makes Students Braggarts Fditnr I'-n'i Rxiiqe Section: 1 irrly disagree with the writer ::e letter in your p.i;er yester- o is m : avor ot corpora, pun- cia y w .shment in the schools. Are we to return to the dark aee, I.ook.r.g ba k 40 ear.s to mv 'hoo'. as, I remember that the fellows who were brought to the pnncipal's office for a rattanir.c were habitual troublemakers and the bcatir.i had no effect except to make braggarts ot the came out and boasted thai taken 20 whacks or so. May'oe the principal fe ric" after the session, bu' I do not lieve that the punishment had :r desired effect. Let's have mw irr.c ll.iie me n dealing with children than c; letter w::ter oi externa-, re. om mends. J, D MONAHAN. Bay Ridge, Aug. lo,

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