The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 13, 1966 · Page 4
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, December 13, 1966
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Blythevllle (Ark.) Courier News — Tuesday, December 13 1968 ~ Page Itvt THUNDERING HERD charges off in a mass start of the annual Berlin cross-country run. Runners of all sizes, shapes and ages participated in the race, but the situation at finish line was considerably less crowded than this. Stock Center Small But Very Efficient By JOHN CUNNIFF AP Business News Analyst I Neither the company nor its owners are traders. A company NEW YORK (AP) — Much of J ule calls for the firing of any the basic stock market research: analyst who trades in a stock on that is used for trading or that which Argus is preparing a re- is broadcast by brokers port. Offices are noticeably de- Uirpughout the country comes | void of stock tickers. from a single source in the financial district here. This source is the Argus Re- private firm reasons a stock -hot" It plunged $19.62 to $106.75. A direct cause-affect relationship hasn't been established between ttie meeting and the action. It might have been a mere coincidence. The two factors might not even be related. 'I don't know if it was a coincidence," said Joseph Dorsey. 'We might have had some impact." He continued: 'If a fund decides to sell> though > U is a can be the reason for „„ uc H1C ..«» mutual IcarefuUy ftwtfrt out decision. funds buying or selling, or in . I Most of them knew our feeling a surance companies investing I"?*" 10 d , ays e f llen The y r 6 might have been gloomy even before the meeting." millions. Argus information is basic, the result of original research. search Corp., a that wholesales It is a small company, em- i It constantly follows 350 broadly ploying only 20 analysts, but its I traded stocks through good impact is huge. Regular customers receive a times and bad. Therefore, although fallible, it often spots an market and economic information to more than 150 brokerage houses, insurance companies, mutual funds, banks and others. Argus clients are r?ie blue chips among stock market trad- basic stock I weekly stock report, about 1501 impending change for better or analyses of stocks a year, in- j worse. depth studies of industries and j The founder is Harold Dorsey, companies, reports of specific j w ho serves as chief economist, interest to institutions, and aJHis son, Joseph, is president, ticket to monthly meetings. | Another son, George, is vice The most important aspect of j president. These are the only Argus' work, however, is in the i ers, and each pays ?200 a month personal relationship its ana for the basic service. The public lysts maintain with clients cannot subscribe. Much information is handled by To obtain such a clientele,' telephone. Clients can even reni Argus has developed an impeccable reputation. In the critical Securities and Exchange Commission report of the early 1960s it was commended for its efforts toward quality and reliability. a tape recording of monthly meetings. The information supplied by Argus often is the basis for additional reports by brokerage houses, and may be one of the STEWART'S (C£u/''"ta60e/ feafefet' UAW FILL ONLY ONCE A YEAR! RONSON Varaflame CROWN *25°° Most famous Renson labte lighter style now BUTANE fueled! Fashioned In rich silver plate. RONSON I V ••••••••{ RONSON VerrofloMie NORSEMAN *20°° Sleek modem ttyling In genuine walnut and stainless steel. Ideal for home or office. BUTANE TABLE LIGHTERS - •""•" ~l *Ar Futl In stconds—light avtr a I yiar! Tht fu«l can r t «veperoti! I if You can dial th« flamo te any ! (Might. J * Clian-burning. othiTlll flaint, j full/ g wranfiid fey *w»n RONSON Verallame PORRINGER Stewart Prescription Drug Store 220 E. Main stockholders of the firm, founded in 1934. 'We are in a position not to give a hoot and a holler if the market goes up, down or sideways," Joseph Dorsey said. More On Nov. 16 a regular monthly meeting was held in the 23rd"- floor Argus offices at 61 Broadway. Attending were mutual fund officers, brokers and other large investors and investment advisers. In the course of a discussion on the economy and ils weaknesses, Argus officials gave the opinion that some of the semiconductor — electronic components — manufacturers might be in for less profitable times. Named specifically were some stocks that are found heavily in the portfolios of mutual funds and other institutions, some of them Argus clients. One of these was Fail-child Camera. 'On the following day what has come to be known as the Fairchild affair occurred on the New York Stock Exchange. More than 25 per cent of Fairchild stock changed hands, or come 562,000 shares. The price One of Jupiter's 12 satellites, Amalthea, is slowiy spinning closer to the planet and astro- American- Film Due By BOB THOMAS AP Movie-Television Writer HOLLYWOOD (AP) - The first U. S.-U.S.S.R. movie project is proceeding at a deliberate pace, says producer composer Dimitri Tiomkin, off on his sixth mission to Moscow in a year. The position of producer is new for Tiomkin, for 34 years one of Hollywood's most noted writers of musical scores — four Oscars, 20 nominations. But he has leaped into it with customary gusto and appears to be succeeding where others have failed, in bringing about an American-Russian film venture. Before flying on a Christmas journey to the Soviet Union — "Vot a terrible time to go!" — Today In History By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Today is Tuesday, Dec. 13, the 347th day of 1966. There are 18 days left in the year. Today's highlight in history: On this date in 1775, the Continental Congress authoried the building of 13 ships of war. A few merchant ships had been commissioned before this date but it generally is regarded as the birthday of the U.S. Navy. On this date: In 1781, a day of prayer and thanksgiving was observed throughout the original 13 colonies at the end of the Revolu- tionar War. In 1918, President Woodrow nomers estimate that .the two! Wilson arrived in France to par- bodies will collide in 70 or 80 ticipate in peace negotiations at million years. World's longest span of undersea cable, stretching 3,600 miles from Tuckerton, N.J., to St. Hilaire-de-Riez, France, was placed in service in 1965. It can handle 128 simultaneous conversations. A U.S. president cannot grant a posthumous pardon. Versailles. In 1924, American labor leader Samuel Gompers died. In 1944, Army and Navy commanders conferred in the Pacific with Adm. Chester Nimitz to lay out plans of war against Japan. Ten years ago — News dispatches from Manila set the death toll in the Philippines as a result of Typhoon Polly at 79. LSD Effects On Animals Gives Varied Reactions ATLANTA, s. (AP) - Mice walked backwards, rabbits grew mean, and dogs just stared at the walls. It was the effect of the hallu- cinator drug LSD, fed to animals for two years by Dr. M. Jackson Marr, a psychology professor at Georgia .Tech who hopes to find out what happens to animals —including people — on an LSD "trip." * * * His conclusion: LSD can be extremel dangerous when not administered under professional direction. "I would rather dis- tibute cyanide free than LSD, because most people know how, dangerous cyanide is," he said. The drug has beneficial effects in treating patients, he said, but under improper application its dangers are "directly propotional to the incompeten- cy of the person." Reaction to LSD are as diverse anl complex as the personalities of the users, Marr said, and it's the same with animal. Rabbits and cats became pugnacious. Mice walked backward. Guppies tried to Swim through their aquarium walls. Dogs became listless, stretched out and staring at a wall for hours. Russian to Start Tiomkin explained how the deal came about.. He had originally been signetf to produce a dramatic musical subject for National General's proposed theater-television system, to be used in the theater chain's movie houses. Tiomkin came up with the idea of the life of Tschaikovsky, which would be made in the Soviet Union. To his surprise, the Russians seemed interested. "They knew my work, strangely enough," h« remarked. "During the war, I had been with Frank Capra on the niakiwng of films for the government, and one of them was "The Battle of Russia,' which the Russians liked. Also, they still remembered fondly "The Great Waltz,' for which I adapted the Strauss music." National General dropped its proposed program, but Tiomkin wasn't dissuaded. He began negotiations with CBS and 'Lowell Thomas to do the Tschaikovsky project for television. "But then I saw the success 'My Fair Lady' and "The Sound of Music,'" he remarked, and I thought to myself, it might be better to do it as a moving picture." The Russians were still interested, and Tiomkin decided he also needed the backing of a capitalistic American studio. He solicited Warner Brothers and drew an enthusiastic reponse. Under the deal, the Soviet Union will pay the production costs, which Tiomkin estimates between 8 and 10 million dollars. Warners guarantees certain payments in return 'for rights to release "Tschai- kovsky" thoughout the world except in Communist countries and Finland. * * * "Most of the picture will be shot- in Russia," said the producer, "but we will also have locations at Carnegie Hall in New York, and in Paris and Florence, Italy." The cast will be most Russian, but an American or English actress may play the composer's patroness, Madame von Meek. The title role will be enacted by I. Smoktunovsky, famed for his "Hamlet" Rus- sian style. Shooting Is expected sianstyle. Shooting is exected to start In March or April and continue for six months. Tiomkin has the special advantage of being able to negotiate with the Russians in their own tongue. He was born in Russia and was permitted to go to Germany for concerts in 1928. He kept going, all the way to the) United States. PARKER 45 CONVERTIBLE This is the gift to choose if you're looking for something that's not only useful, but truly memorable! The Parker 45 is convertible...loads with cartridges or slip in the converter and it fills from an ink bottle. The gift that reminds them of your thoughtfulness for many years to come. With pencil, $8.95 ^ Plaza WALGREEN AGENCY PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER Drugs PRICES REDUCED On Our Complete Stock of Records Just in Time for Christmas! Single 45 r s - - ea. 77c Reg. $3.98 HiFi Albums • ea.*2 66 Reg. $4.98 Stereo Albums • • ea. *3 47 Quality Radio & TV PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER PLENTY OF WATER makes the difference And our goal is always to provide plenty of water... when and where you need it BLYTHEVILLE W ATER CO.

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