The Clay Center Dispatch from Clay Center, Kansas on August 8, 1904 · 1
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Clay Center Dispatch from Clay Center, Kansas · 1

Publication:
Location:
Clay Center, Kansas
Issue Date:
Monday, August 8, 1904
Page:
1
Start Free Trial
Cancel

-- f 4 T - n M J l. S' t - fjEVEWNCh l EDITION U i r I s EVENING EDITION VOLUMlfi II. NUMBER 125. MONDAY. CLAY CENTER, KANSAS, AUGUST 8, 1904. MONDAY. PRICE FIVE CENTS. r, & I COMMISSIONERS WRESTLE WITH BRIDGE CONTRACTS COUNTY TEACHERS CLIFTONS MAN ON STATE TICKET 9 x .V y , t' rf. o T w li " v s Many Concerns Bid on the Seven Structures o Be Erected in Clay County. MORGANVILLJKS BRIDGE FOR $3,200 Leavenworth People Get Bulk of Work-Contest Over Morgan-ville Road. August 5 the board met in adjourned session, and pioceeded to open bids to build the following bridges: .Standard Bridge company, bridges number 1 to 0 inclusive os advertised, $2,428; Morganville blidge $3,300. Lear enwoi th Bridge company, 1 to 0, $1,943; Morganville, $3,200. J American Bridge company 1 to C, $1,997 ; Morganville, $5,200. John (Jalligan Bridge company, 1 to C, $3,227 ; Morgan; ille, $0,450. Canton Bridge company, 1 to 0, $1,-997; Moiganville $3,330. H. T. Waid & Co. 1 to 0 $2,890; Morganville $0,000. Charles G. Shecley 1 to 0 $2,384; Morganville $4,000. Missouri Vialley Bridge company 1 to C $1,993; Morganville $3,325. John W. Towle Bridge company, 1 to C, $2,350; Morganville, $3,481. Midland Bridge company, 1 to C, $2,-203; Morganville, $4,230. Interstate Bridge company, 1 to 0, $2,547; Morganville, $5,295. The Dildine Bridge company, 1 to 0, $2,572; Morganville, $5,412. A. M. Blodget Bridge company, 1 to 6, $2,284; Morganville, $5,000. On motion the board adjourned to ' :30 p. m. The matter of the viewers report upon the roads petitioned for by F. L. Fletcher and David Babb was taken up for Consideration. William Silver appeared before the board in person and by liis attorney, Hy. W. Stackpole, objected to the amount of damage allowed him by the viewers in the Fletcher road and contended that lie should be allowed all the damage claimed in his application to said viewers. A delegation of citizens from Morganville and vicinity also appeared before the board and filed a petition signed by 32 residents ot the county, asking the board to accept report of the viewers in the said Fletcher road, and order the road opened at the earliest pos-ihle time. After listening to the discussion of the aboe matter the board adjourned to next day. August C the board met per adjournment, Messrs. Berger and Sharpe present. George Howard came befoie the board and asked to be permitted to pay his taxes at face of tax as shown by tax roll of Exeter township, which was allowed a-i requested. The viewers report in the matter of establishing a road petitioned for by David Babb and others was again taken up for consideration. After careful and deliberate consideration of the whole matter, having taken to their assistance the county attorney, and finding the report of the viewers favorable to the establishment of the road, and finding that notice by publication set up in the office of the county clerk and in the township in which the road is proposed to be established for twenty days, and REMINDERS j August. 8 Board of Education Meeting. 9 Commercial Chib Meeting. 9 Entertainment iat Washington School House. 9 Tabernacle Mice ting Closes at Woodburys Grove, Bala 11 Idana C. E. Picnic at Worralls Grove, Half-Mile South of Town. 12 Board of Chautauqua Directors Meets. 10 A. O. U. W. Ficnic at Clifton. 17 Old Settlers Reunion at Palmer Two Days. 18 City Council Meeting. 18 Ninth District Christian Endeavor Union at Presbyterian Church Two Pays. 18 Old Settlers Picnic at Gridleys Grove Two Days.' 20 Industrys Celebration. 20 Republican County Convention. 23 Ice Cream Social at the Eilers Home. 24 Eighth Annual Republican City C. E. ricnie at Ja-x Chestnuts Grove. 25 Fifth District Woodmen Log Rolling at Clay Center. 29 County High School Opeaa P. M. CONRAD MAKES AN IMPORTANT BUSINESS MOVE 4 1 " Purchases the Fullington Building on Lincoln Avenue for His Furniture Establishment. F. M. Conrad, the furniture man, has purchased what is known as the old J. C. Johnston building on Lincoln avenue troni F. B. Fullington, and as soon as the woik ot remodeling can be accomplished will move bis stock of goods thereinto. The consideration named in t tie deed is $4,000 which is considered a rue bargain by tho-e v ei'sed in real estate values. The building is one of the most commodious mercantile blocks in me city, oeing 25x140 feet in the clear, two stories high with a full length basement beneath. In addition to a stairway leading by stages from cellar to top story an elevator atlords means of transferring passengers and goods to any floor desired.- by publication in the Times, a weekly newspaper published in Clay county for two consecutive weeks, setting forth the presentation of said petition, giving the substance thereof, and that the viewers would, on the 2t)th day of July, 1904, proceed to view said road, have been given as required by law; and the board, finding that the said road will be practicable and of public utility, it was on motion ordered that the road be opened to public travel at a width of sixty feet, in accordance with the survey and phrt thereof, presented to the board by X. Allen, county surveyor, and the clerk be instructed to give legal notice to the township trustee to open said road in accord r nee herewith. The amount of damage allowed by the viewers was on motion approved. The board then went out to inspect i..e work being done on tire river dikes. Tire viewers report in the matter of establishing a road petitioned for by F. L. Fletcher and others was again taken up for consideration. After careful and deliberate investigation of the whole matter, having taken to their assistance the county attorney, and finding the report of the v lowers favorable to the establishment of the road, and finding that notice by publication set up in the office of the county clerk, and in the township in which the road is proposed to be established, for twenty days, and by publication in the Times, a weekly paper published in Clay count, for two consecutive weeks, setting forth the piesentation of said petition, giving the substance thereof, and that the vewers would, on the 25th day of July, 1904, pioceed to view said road, have been given as- required by law ; and the boaul finding tint said load will be practicable and of public utility, it was on moton oidered that the roau be opened to public travel at a width of sixty feet, in ae-eoidanee with the plat and Survey thereof, presented to the board by X. Allen, county surveyor, and the clerk be instiuctod to give legal notice to the township trustee to open said road in accordance herewith. The report of the viewers on the amount of damage allowed vva-i on motion approved, except the amount allowed for building fence, which amount was raised from $50 to $83. On motion the board adjourned to Monday morning. The contract for the construction of the Morganville bridge was let to the Leavenworth bridge company at $3,200. This company vva-t given the contract for bridges Xo. 1, 2, 5 and 0 (across Otter creek, Gain creek, and two across Spring creek) for $750. The Missouri Valley Bridge company was awarded the contracts for Nos. 3 and 4 (across Chapman creek and Badger creek) for $1,240. GAS FITTINGS IN HOTEL. Wakefields New Hostelry Will Be a Fine Establishment. Special to The Dispatch. Wakefield, Kan., Aug. 8. The gas fittings have been placed in the '' evv hotel this week and the lathing is .veil under way. The coni act for the plastering has been let to patties in Clay Cen-tei who 'will cupii, mice on the work as soon ns ready. It is expected that the building will be trady for occupancy about October 1. , Should a subscriber on the list of either the Daily or Weekly Dispatch fail from any cause to receive a copy of each issue to which they are entitled a favor will be conferred if the office is immediately, notified of the fact. Dont wait for the second miss, but attend to the matter at once, and the action will be appreciated. Go to the new coal ynrd for all kinds of threshing coal. Home Lumber Co, When seen by a Dispatch man this afternoon Mr. Conrad said it was his intention to furnish the building throughout in the most modern st le. A glass paititiun will sepaiate the front 100 feet or main room, from the work shop in the rear. A foie c of men are now employed in cleaning out the rooms preparatory to tne advent of paper hangeis and pi inters. The new owner expects to take possession sometime between now and the 1-t of October, the exact aate depending on the time when the workmen have it in readiness. The new location is considered a better one than the one now occupied, it be-ag nearer to the business center of the city. COULD NOT ASK MORE. Clay Center Brick Companys Proposition to Purchasers. There aie a great many sidewalks to be laid in this city this summer and fall. We want to sell the brick for them and we have plenty of first-class biiek on hand now, which we are peifeetly willing to guarantee and wan ant in every lespect to be as good as the best brick ever shipped into this town, and far better than the majority have been. It is true that the old Clay Center Pressed Brick company, when it first staited in business made and sold some brick that was not good, but there has not been a poor brick made for the past eighteen months. The Clay Center Brick company has replaced many of these poor brick and expects to leplacc many more of them with good brick. While this company is not legally bound to do so, it lias felt that it should do so, and will continue to do so as fast as it can, but on the brick made and sold by it now, it is perfectly willing to assume the risk and wan ants to replace them in the walk if they do not prove gocxl. We iare paying out for labor each week from $150 to $200. This money is all spent in this city, and we feel that we are outnled to the tiade and support ot the citizens, and we are getting most of it. A few have ouleied brick and a few more are talking of doing so. We dont want them to do so. We want them to use our buck with our guarantee, and thus help us to build up a permanent industry. See our guarantee in our adveitisement in this paper The Clay Center Biiek Co. BUYS A GENERAL STORE. J. M. Hall Trades for Establishment at Kelly. J. M. Hall returned Friday evening fiom Kelly, Kan., whole he made ar-langements by which he became sole owner of the general merchandise store in that little city. Mr. Hall, we undci-stancl, traded in his farm near Idana and his bowling alley in this city for tlie store in Kelly. The farm goes to in. Must, of Goffs, Kan., the former owner of the store, and the bowling alley here goes to E. B. Bonnets, who resides near Green leaf. Mr. Mast will rent out the farm, and Mr. Bennets has secured the services of Paul Smith, who hns been working in the bowling alley neie for the past two or three years, to run the alley on commission. Kelley is a flourishing little burg in Nemaha county, about ten miles from Seneca, and is on the Kansas City & Northwestern railway. Mr. Hall intend-, to tike possession of t he store and stock at once, his son Will, who owns a part interest in it, already being there. The -rest of the family, with the exception of Miss Belle, w ho remains to teach this winter, will go to Kelley very soon. The residence property here will be retained and will probably be rented. While the people vvf Clay Center will be sorry to see Mr. Hall and family go, they will have the best wishes of ia host of friends for a successful career in tneir future home. , TRANSFERS OF REAL ESTATE. August C: W. P. Gates and wife to J. N. Humbert; warranty deed, $1,300; lots 1 to 3 and 7 to 12, block 40, Wakefield. Same to same; quit claim deed, $152; block 34, Wakefield. Republic county also holds a special examination for teachers in order to obtain enough to supply the schools of the county, while one of the Clay Center papers complains that Threshers are scarce this year. Washington Republican. List of Those Who Have Contracts With Local Boards Grows Steadily Day by Day. A FEW PLACES 4 ARE STILL OPEN Latest to Be Reported to the Office of the County Superintendent of Schools. The list of district reporting the hiring of tc hers to the county superintendent is slowly lengthening, and now stands us follows: 1. Ida B. Gastello, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $43. 2. Myra Coffman, for a term of six months beginning September 19, at $33. 3. Jessie Chestnut, for a term of seven months beginning September 5, at $35. 4. J. W. Wiiglit, for a term of seven months beginning September 5, -at $43. 3. Maggie Reed, for a term of eight months beginning September 5. at $40. (' W. It. Teivvilliger, for a teim of eight mouths beginning September 5, at $40. 9. Ira Gardner, for a term of six months beginning September 19, at $4'. 50. 10. Ada Koerner, for a term of seven months beginning September 5, at $33. 12. R. B. Arnold, for a term of eight months beginning September 5 at $50. 17. Emma v.. Schriver, for a seven months term beginning September 12 at $45. 18. Laura Klipseh, for a term of eight months, beginning September 5, at $40. 19. v Fannie Blackwood, for a term of seven months beginning September 5, at $40. 23. Lulu Kemp, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $43. 24. Bessie Garrett, for a term of eight months beginning September 19 at $40. 25. Ellen Rae, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $40. 27. H. D. Miller, for a term of seven months, beginning September 19, at $40. 29. Maude Ristinc, for term of seven months, beginning September 5, at $35. 31. Drie-illa Garrett, for a term of seven months beginning September 12 at $35. 32. Minnie Johnson, for a term of seven months beginning September 5 at $30. 34. Susie Henry, for a teim of eight months beginning September 12, at $35. 35. Emma Van Hove, for a teim of seven months beginning September 19, at $33. 30. Jennie Howie, for a term of eight months beginning September 12, at $40. 38. Mabelle Galloway, for a term of six months beginning September 19, at $37.50. 39. W. Wilkins., for a term of eight months beginning September 5, at $37.50. 41. Iva Miles, for a term of eight months beginning September 12, at $40. 41. W. YY. Arner, for a term of eight months beginning September 12, at $45. 41. Fred S. Householder, for a term of eight months beginning September 12, at $40. 42. Mary C. Baker, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $32.50. 44. E. L. Gerardy, for an eight months term beginning September 12 at $45. 45. Joseph Marty, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $49. 40.' Laura Ileusner, for a seven months term beginning September 12 at $35. 40. Dovie Baker, for ia term of six months beginning October 3, at $37.50. 49. Alice Van Scoyoe, for six months term beginning September 19 at $35. 57. Floyd P. Smith, for a term of seven months beginning September 19, at $35. 59. Fay Branford, for a term of seven months beginning September 5, at $35. 01. Mary E.' Tate, for a term of six months beginning September 12, at $35. 07. Della M. Caldwell, for a term of seven months, beginning September 12, at $40. 08 Alfred Grobcrg, for a seven month term beginning September 12 at $45. 09. Esther Bottombley, for a term of six months beginning October 5, at $40. 71. Jennie Rea, for a term of six months beginning September 5, at $40. 72. Caroline Cowell, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $40. T. M. DOLAN. 78. Lena McKee, for a teim of seven months beginning September 12 at $35. 80. Eva Walker, for a term of seven months beginning September 19, at $35. 81. Nellie Kinman, for a term of seven months, beginning September 5, at $35. S2. Mabel Anthony, for a term of -even months, beginning September 12 or 19, at $40. 80. Mi-. E. S. Howland, for a teim of six months beginning September 3, at $38. 90. Eva Davies, for a teim of seven months beginning Septemocr 12, at $35. 91. Bert Woirall, for a term ot seven months, beginning September 19, at $45. 92. Libbie Alquist, for a term of seven months beginning Sente m .or 5, at $37. 93. Viola B. Kvnaston, for six months term beginning September 19 at $35. 95. J. G. Stewart, for a term of seven months beginning September 12, at $35. 98. Alfred Larson, for a term of six months beginning September 5, at $35. SPECIAL MEETING COMMERCIAL CLUB A special meeting of the commercial club is called for Tuesday evening. Several matters of importance are to be discussed and full attendance of business men is desired. F. L. Williamson, Pres-if. lit. UPPER LINCOLN CREEK. Wheat Cut Before the Rain Makes Much Best Yield. Special to The Dispatch. Upper Lincoln Creek, Aug. What little threshing that has been done in this noighboihood proves that the wheat cut before the rain gives a much hotter yield than the pieces cut later; the wheat is oi pretty good quality. Fay Thompson came from Kansas City la-t week and will spend a week or two at the home of Mr. Householder. Mr. Fletcher had a runaway last Thui mIu v and was bruised pietty badly. The Misses Van Hove spent the afternoon with the Misses Pratt on Wednesday. This week will very likely see all of the grain stacked excepting the ones wiiting for machines. Emma Mall ha been spending the past week in Clay Center attending the Chautauqua. Mrs. J. W. Householder has been quite ill the past few days. J. M. Stilt has been quite sick for a few days. Mrs. Tom Householder has been spending the past week with Mrs. J. W. liousliolder. Mrs. Story and daughter spent the day at the home of Mr. Fletcher on Thursday. Miss Tripp in Minnesota. Word Jrom Miss Lydia, Tripp, who, with Miss Sara Hosmer, is spending a few weeks at Edgerton, Minn., is to the effect that she is having a fine time. Ed-gerton is quite a noted summer resort, and is situated on the highest land between the Alleghenies and the Rockies. It is very cool and beautiful and is near the famous Spirit Lake, in Iowa, the scene of one of the early Indian massacres. One log cabin still stands to mark the spot of the massacre and a very pleasant old lady, Mrs. Abbie Gardner Sharp, shows this cabin and its relies to visitors. She is the only survivor of the massacre, having been only fourteen years old at the time and taken prisoner by the Indians. Miss Tripp expects to remain in Minnesota for some time longer, and will stop again in North Dakota on her way ho me. Weather Indications. The government weather forecast ai Starkweathers is as follows: Partly cloudy and local showers. Warmer Tuesday and north portion tonight. Something of Tom Dolan, Democratic Candidate for State Treasurer. NOT A VOTE ASKED IN CONVENTION Honor Came Unsought Has Been Sheriff and Revenue Collector-Business Man. Special to The Dispatch. Clifton, Kan., Aug. S. T. M. Dolin, Democratic nominee for state treasurer is a native of Ohio, but a resident of Kan-tis for the past thiity-tluee ears. Mr. Dolan comes of Irish parentage, boin and reared a Catholic and his religious eieed is still naturally of that faith. However, Mr. Dolan is so tolerant and liberal in his views, believing as he does, that it is the character that constitute imliv idu.lism rathler (than eieed, and he has the esteem and well wi-ties of all with whom he comes in contact, irrespective of church or politics. Mr. Dolan was twice elected sheriff of Washington county, overcoming a large Republican majority. He was also appointed revenue collector under President Clevelands administration in 1893, which office lie held for four years and until relieved by the appointment of a Republican under President McKinley. Mr. Dolan was vice-president of the Clifton State bank for several years, but is now actively engaged in the telephone business as a large stockholder and manager of the system of the city, counties and many miles of toll lines, which is daily increasing. His liominaton for the responsible position of state treasurer was unsought and given without Mr. Dolan asking for one single vote in the convention, but it if understood that he is now a candidate who is in the race to win and none arc more enthusiastic for his election than his home people who know him best. WHY DID THEY SIGN? Cripple Creek Men are Called on the Carpet by Citizens Alliance. Clippie Creek, Col., Aug 8. Eight of the forty-eight men who were arrested after the Independence explosion and charged with murder, conspiracy, the Victor riot and minder, have been released on bonJs furnished by business nen of the oLtiict in sums ranging fiom $1,500 to $V)0C0. The, si lioiul-meii have been summoned before the Citizens alliance to give their reasons for going on the bonds. Former Sheriff Henry M. Robertson, who returned to the district Thursday, de-paited today for Denver after having made a formal demand on Undershei'ifl Par-ons for possession of the office which he asserts lie was forced to resign under duress, lie says he will attempt to regain his former position through the courts. THE PICNIC SEASON. Four Parties of Pleasure Seekers at Stillwater Sunday. There were four different parties of picnickers it Stillwater Sunday. Clue was t lit crowd chaperoned by Dr. and Mrs. Earl Bonar, camping there for a w eek. Another crowd comprised the Wliitsitt and Danenhauer families and another was made up of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Munson, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Keener and children .and Mr. and Mrs. Keith, and in the other crowd were Dr. and Mrs. R. II. Millen and Misses Tryxye and Merithal, Florence Kay, George Bo-nine and H. C. Steritt. Miss Bertha Gaylord went to Morgan; ille Saturday. Orders Effecting Fourth Cavalry. The follow ir.g is a press dispatch from Washington: Orders have been issued by the war department revoking the orders of June, relieving the Third battalion, Tenth infantry, from duty at the Presidio, San Francisco, and directing it to take station at Fort Walla Wala, Wnh., and also modifying orders issued at the same time for a change of stations of the Fourth and Ninth cavalry as to direct the Fourth cavalry to take the stations now occupied by I lie Ninth cavalry. Webster & Steward have opened the city shop on Court street, between Third and Fourth. Horse shoeing done in first-class style. Track and roadsters a specialty. Interfering and forging hor-es corrected. We al-o do repair work and plow work; plows tempered in oil if so desired. Give us a trial. t ' t i t V 4 I 4 d ' r t V! f i i ) I, b i $ $ I "h t K t f ? 5 t 1 4 1 k $ i i , " 1 1 1 fr H 1 1 r f W 1 ' A A SP'w tf- t s K S ft A

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 15,000+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free