The Kansas City Times from Kansas City, Missouri on January 1, 1968 · Page 2
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The Kansas City Times from Kansas City, Missouri · Page 2

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Monday, January 1, 1968
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m 2 A. ★ ★ THE KANSAS CITY TIMES, MONDAY, JANUARY 1, 1968 Patrick Lyndon ■ Nugent áíL JündiL. (piopÙL Bob Hope Optimistic About War ir os ANGELES (AP)—Comedian Bob Hope, obvioixsiy I tired, has returned after two weeks of entertaining U. 1 V S. troops in Vietnam and told newsmen: “Sure, we’re winning the war.*' “I was very aware of the gunfire,’' Hope quipped. “I usually sit in tiie jump seat. But, when we left, I was under the jump seat.” The war-front audiences entertained by his troupe were larger this year, averaging about 12,000, Hope said. The soldiers liked his joke about “the big game,’* he said, adding, “I told them the score ended U. C. L. A. 21, Dow CSiemical company 12. However, Dow Chemical evened it up when they passed out asbestos draft cards.” This was a reference to recent demonstra- Bob Hop* tions at the University of California at Los Angeles against job recruiters from Dow Chemical company, producer of napalm used in bombs. ★ ★ ★ Disturbed by Philip's Flying Decision London (AP)—Prince Philip has disclosed that when he announced that he was going to learn night flying “there was absolute pandemonium” among members of Britain’s air staff. Queen Elizabeth’s husband made the disclosure in an interview with Harold Morrison, chief of the London bureau of the Canadian Press. It was the first exclusive interview given by the prince to a Canadian. Philip said that he had always wanted to fly. When he married Elizabeth and was made a marshal of the Royal air force among other military ranks, he said he felt the time had arrived. • “It seemed only right and proper that if I was gomg to wear the uniform of an air force officer, I ought at least to learn to fly,” he said. ★ ★ ★ Patrick Lyndon Nugent Is Troubled Austin, Tex. (AP)—President Johnson*s 6-month-old grandson, mPatrick Lyndon Nugent, has been ailing a bit with common baby trouble—teething—aggravated by a cold. When he ran some temperature at the LBJ ranch near Johnson CUy, it was decided to take the baby the 65 miles to his doctor here jor a checkup. Mother, Luci Nugent, and papa, Patrick Nu¡gent, were on a year-end skiing holiday in the iNorthern New Mexico winter resort at Red River. ¡But, it evidently wasn't anything serious enough 4o bother them. In response to questions about the baby's health, the first lady’s press secretary, Mrs. Eliza- heth Carpenter, reported from Washington that little Lyn seemed to be all right yesterday—with temperature normal, and was **happy, playing patty-cake.” •k, ~k ir Pablo Casals's Anniversary Is Marked New York—The 91st birthday anniversary of Pablo Casals, master cellist, conductor and teacher, has been observed on a broadcasting company network, first in a plea by Casals for the brotherhood of man and later in*a taped recording of his participation last summer in the Marlboro festival at Marlboro, Vt. If the step of Casals is understandably on the careful side, his vigor and concentration on the podium erase all thoughts of age. At the Marlboro festival, which was presented without commercial interruption by the Bell Telephone hour, Casals exhorted the younger musicians not merely to play notes but find the expressive meaning in Mozart’s “Haffner” symphony. Although the evening hour was nominally entitled “Casals at Marlboro,” the program actually showed other musicians and composers, including Rudolf Serkin, the pianist, and Alexander Schneider, the violinist, teaching at Marlboro. ★ ★ ★ Veil Holds on Abdication Records L ondon (AP)—official secrecy will continue to veil the 1936 cabinet debates on the abdication of King Edward r VIII despite a new law that could have made them public. Minutes of the debates on the crisis over the king’s decision to marry the divorced American, Wallis Warfield Simpson, are not expected to be released until the death of the couple, now the (Juke and duchess of Windsor. The request for continued secrecy was believed to have come from government officials and not the duke or the royal family, r Under a law passed &is year, the period of secrecy for government and official papers covering the years 1923 to 1937 was shortened to 30 years. But the keeper of public i:ecords ^says the Windsor lord chancellor had signed an order restricting access to the ab- ^ctation records “for a further period.” This is permitted if the records embarrass living persons, ★ ★ ★ : Cartoonist Tom Doerer, 68, Retires •' Baltimore (AP)—Cartoonist Tom Doerer, who began his newspaper career as a copy boy for the famed writer, H. L. Mencken, retired Saturday from the Baltimore News American. Z “Í had a front page cartoon in the old Baltimore World when 1 was 10, and I worked for Mencken a couple of years later at Ùie Baltimore Herald,” Doerer said. *'He arranged a scholarship for me at the Maryland Institute. " Doerer's first fulltime newspaper job was a retoucher for ffie Baltimore American. ' He later became assistant sports editor of the American, held a similar job at the Baltimore Evening Sun and then became sfmrts editor of the Baltimore Post. ‘*'2 'Doerer, 68, also worked on newspapers in Philadelphia, Wash- u^ton, Boston, Elizabeth, N. J., Richmond, Va., and tancas- fer,‘Pa. ★ ★ ★ I*; Tito Marks 30-Year-Gld Rule •2 ^Belgrade—Josif Broz Tito, who has ruled his country longer ftian any other livmg Communist leader, was honored last week, 30 years after he was called to Moscow and told that he was to replace the purged chief of the ^Yugoslav Communist party. Lookmg three times as tanned and twice as [fit as any of his younger subordinates, the 75?year-old president has driven back and forth through the sleet and slush of a Belgrade winter •to listen to eulogies, acc«»pt gifts and m.ike ¡speeches. Tito attended a climactic ceremony s\\r- rounded by the party presidium and central committee, leading party delegations from the iftsip Broi Tito six constituent republics, find labor, youth, veterans and women’s groups. It. ★ ★ ★ Calls for Observance of Human Rights NITED NATIONS (AP) — Foreign Minister CorneUu Manescu of Romania, president of the U. N. General Assembly, called yesterday for universal observance of the International Year for Human Rights, which begins 'loday. In a statement issued at U. N. headquarters, Manescu ;4Írged all nations and international organizations to dedicate v|fiemselves with renewed vigor to the task of secuiing for peo- the world over the full enjoyment of the human rights. - “I urgently appeal to all,” he added, “at the beginning ot International Year for Human Rights, to work t^ether to 5^ing about the conditions of international peace, understanding co-operation necessary to insure the full enjoyment of hu- -Ïïiân rights and fundamental freedoms.” : « De Gaulle Bigger News Than Expo 67 * -Toronto (.4P)—Charles de Gaulle was bigger than E j ^ in ; 19^7, Canadian editors say. In a ballot, they decided the French presi- > dent’s actions constituted the leading Canadian i news story of the year, * His trip to Canada actually was linked to Î Expo 67, the world’s fair marking Canada’s ce»- ‘ tennial. But De Gaulle made news by shooting, * “Long Live free Quebec” and drawing a govern^ ment rebuke that led him to cut short his visit. The editors decided Expo was Canada’s No. 2 story of 1967, with the centennial itself No. 3. IJ Chariot dt Gaullo AREA IN GRIP OF FRIGID GOLD (Continued From Page lA) inance would remain in effect most of today. That phase prohibits the use of motor cars not equipped with snow tires or diains on emergency snow routes. The £Lrst phase was pat into effect Satur^iy night. Falin said he would announce today whether it wonld be extended or lifted. Despite the cold weather, George Eib, superintendent of constructicm and development for the parks and recreatioo de- psotment, said last night that city lakes still were unsafe for ice skating. “No matter how cold it is,” Eib said, “the snow acts as an insulator, jH*eventing the water from freezing. It would be very d^mgerous to go ice skating now.!’ The city public works department said most area, streets were in good condition, except for secondary roads in residential areas. Most Are Treated “We are working as fast as we can witii a skeleton crew,” a spokesman said. “Most important streets akeady have been treated with salt and sand.” The police dispatcher said traffic in Kansas City was exceptionally light for a December 31. Police said it wonld be better for area residents to stay home, nnless they absolutely had to go out. The cold weather caused an electric cable to snap at 10:27 o’clock last night near Sixty- fourth street and Prospect avenue, knocking out power for 45 minutes in about 150 homes in the area. A spokesman for the Kansas City Power & Light Co. said the low temperature caused the cable to contract to the breaking point. Car Hits Utility Pole In an accident attributed to poor driving conditions, a motor car driven by Thomas Lee Bedsworth, 22 years old. of 2917 North River boulevard, struck a utility pole at 1103 South Brookside avenue in Independence Saturday night, knocking electrical power out more than an hour in Northwestern Independence. The area affected was approximately from Truman road north to U. S. 24 and west to the Independence city limits. Police said the unpact broke wu'es and knocked the pole out of position. The cold weather caused other problems. A spot check of area service stations revealed several calls from motorists whose cars had stalled. At the Municipal Air Terminal, heaters were used to blow warm air into the engines of small, private aircraft. There was also a light side to the weather picture. Police said several persons stopped police paddy wagons Saturday night and yesterday, identified themselves as vagrants, and pleaded to be taken to jail because it was too cold. Climbers Wait On Grand Teton Moose, Wyo. (AP)—A dozen mountain climbers huddled inside a small steel hut ll,500 feet up the slope of Grand Teton peak yesterday, wait^ for strong winds to diminish for a final assault on the 13,766-foot mountain on New Year’s day. Expedition leader Paul Petzoldt told a district ranger, Douglas McLaren, by radio yesterday that a furious storm with winds over 50 miles an hour prevented a 6-member assault team, including one woman, from attacking the mountain’s summit. The 59-year-old veteran climber from Lander, who heads the outdoor leadership school, told the ranger an attempt would be made today if the storm lets up. H. S. T. Stands In Cold to Meet Daughter (Continued From Page lA) William Wallace Daniel, 8; Harrison Gates Daniel, 4, and Thomas Washington Daniel, 1%. Clifton Truman Daniel, 10, is on a skiirig trip in New England. Mr. and Mrs. Truman were at the terminal about 15 minutes before plane arrival time and sat in one of the gate waiting areas. As news of their presence in the waiting area spread, about 40 persons also waiting on the jet, moved closed to view the famous couple. An airline hostess, seated a few yards away, said to another stewardess, “(Jee, if I had some paper I would ask for his autograph.” One man, however, walked over to the former I^esident and, after introducing himself and shaking hands, asked if he might also introdnce his teenage daughters to Mr. Truman, who smUed and nodded. After Mr. Truman had stepped into his car, a woman with whom he had just shaken hands, looked at her hand and waved it toward those standing near her. “Did you see that,” she said. “I just shook hands with Harry Truman! All my life I’ve wanted to do that.” Clirton Dani 1, managing editor of the New York Times, is expected to join his wife at the Trumans later tAiis week, after which the family will return to New York. YOUTH DIES OF WOUND Caseyville, HI. (AP)—Robert Cravens, 16, was fatally wounded Saturday in Caseyville when one of two shotguns he had been carrying discharged when he dropped it. The blast struck the youth in the side. ■ —-< --------------. Phone Sunday Want Ads In before noon Saturday. BA 1-5500.—^Adv. GLERGY POINTS TO MAN’S DUTY (Continued From Page lA) and sisters of Christ, eager to promote fair housing for all men—regardless of race, color or creed,” he said. The Rev. David L. Gray al^o reminded his congregation ai the Pleasant Green Baptist church in Kansas City, K<ans&.t^, of the Christian’s duty to his fellow man. Using the parable of the three servants and their accounting of their use of their master’s money, he pointed out that men should use what talents they have to find their place in thc} world. “Do whatever you can, and do it well, but use ,the talents the Lord has given you,” he said. “As we go into the new year, as CSiristians we should resolve to do better in 1968 than we did in 1967 in witnessing for God. We come to learn how to serv/e the Lord when we begin to serve each other.” About 2,000 persons heard W. Wallace Smith, president of the Reorgani?:ed Latter Day Saints church speak at a special New Year’s eve service in the R. L. D. S. auditorium in Independence. Mr. Smith reviewed the last year in the church and issued a challenge to his membership to move out in community service during the coming year. He explained tlie church’s various outlets for public ministry, including assistance to those in need in the community. Waste of War Referring to Vietnam, Mr. Smith said he deplored the waste of manpower and resources but that he felt the United States was justified in what it was doing there. “For a nation to attempt to conquer another in order to impose its ideology on another culture is not in harmony with the best interests of humanity,” he said. In Overland Park at the Atonement Lutheran church, the Rev. Jack F. Hustad told his congregation that taking inventory and setting goals is an essential human activity. “If at the close of the year, you can’t show marked improvement of your being a better person in terms of concrete situations, it would indicate your religion hasn’t been much good to you,” he said. Mr. Hustad recommended a personal inventory of relationships in such areas as racial prejudice, family life and quarrels with neighbors. Vow To Change “You should vow to make some change and to grow into better humans in terms of personal relationships,” he said. ^ “Freedom and the life we desire has to come through the in- ^vidual rather than what an institution like the church or government can do for us,’* the Rev. J. Sig Paulson of Unity Village chapi;! aaid at services yesterday morning. He suggested that the past could be an asset instead of a liability if the individual’s attitude toward the past were changed. “We do this by becoming interested in what is positive and constructive rather than what is negative,” he said. “It will be a new year if we succeed in making new persons out of ourselves.” ass GAIH MADE IN TALKS News Black-Out on Transit Negotiations in New York New York (AF) — A news black-out was clamped yesterday on negotiations aimed at averting a crippling city-wide transit strike, but word leaked before midnight that a slight break- throu^ had been made on the key issue of pensions. The strike deadline set by the transit workers was 5 o’clock this mom^, and observers at the negotiations believed that New Yorkers nught go to bed after their New Year’s eve revels without knowing whether the subways and busses would be running later New Year’s day. MAY THE NEW YEAR BE RICH IN GOOD THINGS FOR YOU AND ALL THOSE DEAR TO YOU. 1ACCARDTS O ifANSAS CITY ewcH av MAIL e» tclvmonk vicrait a-MU á n PLAZA AND DOWNTOWN SALONS-SALE STARTS TUESDAY AT 9 P. M. IßM' JANUARY FUR ^ CI,EARAN€E SALE REDUCES ITS ONE-OF-A-KIND DESIGNER FUR FASHIONS TO GIVE YOU TRULY GREAT JANUARY VALUES NATURAL MINK STOLES Dark Natural Ranch, Autumn Haze*, Down Pastei*, Many Styles $ 240 A Special Group of Dyed Broadtail Processed Lamb Jackets With Natural Autumn Haze"* Cerulean* and Black Dyed Mink Collars 275 ' A Special Group of Black Dyed Broadtail Processed Lamb V a Coats Some with Black Dyed Mink Trim 425 T WEAR YOUR FUR NOW--USE OUR EXTENDED BUDGET PLAN PLAZA SALON FASHIONS REDUCED FOR IMMEDIATE CLEARANCE DYED NORTHERN BACK MUSKRAT COAT ...................................................... $275 BLACK DYED BROADTAIL PROCESSED IAMB JACKET .........................................250 NATURAL EMBA AUTUMN HAZE MINK CAPELET ..................................260 OYSTER WHITE DYED SHEARED BEAVER JACKET ........................................... 480 BLACK DYED BROADTAIL PROCESSED LAMB JACKET WITH BLACK DYED MINK COLLAR... .275 BLACK DYED PERSIAN LAMB COAT WITH NATURAL RANCH MINK COLLAR AND CUFFS.. .495 NATURAL DARK RANCH MINK PAW JACKET.................................................. 350 BLACK DYED PERSIAN LAMB % COAT.......................................................... 495 DYED OYSTER WHITE SHEARED FLANK MUSKPvA.T % COAT WITH NATURAL ARaURUS MINK COLLAR ........................................................................................... 395 FULL LENGTH SHEARED DYED OYSTER MUSKRAT FLANK COAT .............................450 NATURAL EMBA AUTUMN HAZE* MINK STOLE LARGE POLISHANT COLLAR..................395 NATURAL EMBA TOURMALINE* MINK COAT................................................, 1675 KITOVI DYED ALASKAN FUR SEAL COAT.,..................................................... 1350 NATURAL EMBA AUTUMN HAZE* MINK COAT (Full Length) ..................................1250 NATURAL DARK RANCH MINK COAT (Full Length) by ESTEVEZ ............................1495 DOWNTOWN SALON SELEaiONS REDUCED FOR IMMEDIATE CLEARANCE DYED MOUTON PROCESSED LAMB SKI JACKET................................................. 40 DYED NORTHERN BACK MUSKRAT COAT........................................................ 275 DYED FAWN BROADTAIL PROCESSED LAMB JACKET ........................................ 295 BLACK DYED FRENCH RABBIT COAT............................................................. 120 BLACK DYED SHEARED MUSKRAT JACKET with NATURAL ARaURUS MINK COLLAR..... 310 NATURAL PASTEL MINK PAW JACKETS......................................................... 325 BLACK DYED SHEARED MUSKRAT % COAT NATURAL ARCTURUS* MINK COLLAR......... 395 OYSTER WHITE DYED SHEARED MUSKRAT FLANK COAT % .................................;399 BLACK DYED BROADTAIL PROCESSED LAMB COAT ............................................ 425 BLACK DYED PERSIAN LAMB COAT (Full Length) WITH NATURAL RANCH MINK COLLAR.. 495 OYSTER WHITE DYED SHEARED BEAVER JACKET............................................... 480 NATURAL RANCH MINK JACKET ................................................................ 540 NATURAL EMBA ORCHID AUTUMN HAZE* MINK COAT .......................................1250 NATURAL DARK RANCH MINK COAT BLACK CROWN .....................................1800 *T. M. Emba Mink Breeders Association. Fur Products labeled to show country of origin of imported fur» DOWNTOWN, nor WALNUT ^ * Fur Company PLAZA, JEFFERSON AT 48rti

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