Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana on April 3, 1895 · Page 1
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Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 1

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Logansport, Indiana
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Wednesday, April 3, 1895
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VOL XX. LOGANSPORT, INDIANA- WEDNESDAY MORNING. APRIL 3. 1895. NO. 79. t's Peculiar aTHIS WRAPPER FOR 59c. That if a Lady once comes to our Store she keeps a-corning. It's not our way but our Great Variety. Excellept Quality and Choice Assortment ot Goods that must be the Drawing Card. Every De- partmeut is Ready for . .EASTER! and we inyi'i- your inspection. It' You Coim- Once You'll Keep a Coming. Tomorrow . . . We open Special and Reserve Assortment of Choice Dress Goods, Elegant Fancy Stiles J'rom 5Oc up, Capes, Skirts, Wrappers I'roni 50c up, Dress Trimmings iii Immense Variety, Shirt Waists That Fit. Special Inducements Today. This llan.lsomc Capo $-1. is Shirt Waist for^SOc. The Fashion Leaders, | Busy Bee Hive, 409-411 Broadway 306 Fourth St. 1895 SPRING 1895 We take Pleasure in Announcing the Arrival of Our Spring Suitings! And we feel justly proud ia the success of our untiring efforts which enable us to >how you this season the atest. Mo?t Stylish, Most Attractive and Exclusive ne of woolens in the city. Carl W. Keller, Tailor & Draper. 311 Market St. WAIT For the opening of the New Broadway Clothing Store. Entire New Spring Line. Wednesday, April 3- 426 BROADWAY, JOS. G GRACE. CAST THEIR VOTES. Citizens in Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, and Ohio Flock to the Polls. Election Quiet at Chicago, But a Full Vote Being Cast—Results of-Mon- ,d»y's Elections Elsewhere. CHICAGO, April 2.—Perfect weutber, with the thermometer a.-few degrees above the freezing point and plenty of bright sunshine, is coaxing the voters out in large numbers here Tuesday aud there is every probabili tythat a f-ul 1 vote will be recorded by both parties. The greatest interest is manifested in the mayoralty contest, which promises to be closely contested.- The candidates are Frank \Venter (dem.) and George U. ' Swift (rep.). Both Jire pledged to support the cause of civil service and municipal reform, if elected. Swift was defeated in the last election by Mayor Hopkins,, the present incumbent, • uiid the-election was contested but without favorable result for thecontestant. W'cnter.is said to be the candidate of the Hopkins faction in the present campaign. }t is expected several aldermen who have been accused of voting for corrupt measures will be retired to private life. The other offices to bt filled'are those of city treasurer, city attorney, city clerk and judge of the circuit' court. Voting Light at rtt. Loul>. ST. Louis, April 2.—Returns received up to noon show that less interest is manifested in Tuesday's municipal election than has been shown in similar elections during the past , decade. Only members of the fihouses of delegates and city council &&re being voted for, and not 75 per cent, of the total registered vote will be cast. The republicans are confident of electing five out of thu six members of the council by at least C.- 000 majority, and the lower branch of the cit-5' government will be equally divided between democrats and republicans. The weather is clear and cool. Killait In an Kloction Riot, In au election riot at noon Tuesday Frank Thorn was shot twice and fatally wounded by Frank Day. The murderer was arrested and taken to police headquarters. Tiu.'ru was employed as a watcher nt the polls to guard against illegal voting, ;ind was shot while in the discharge o£ his duty. One of the bullets entered his left -breast and another entered his hi;art. A mob pursued the murderer, and in the chuse over twenty shots were fired. Dcnvcr'n Mayoralty Conteit Cloio. DESVKK, Col., April 3.—The weather is warm and pleasant. At B o'clock an xinusnally small vote had been polled. The mayoralty contest is very close. Women Out Their Vote*. CINCINNATI, April 2.—Ohio women were partially emancipated Monday. They voted for scnool board members in the cities. A rain set in before the polls opened and continued nearly all day. It was general throughout the state, but did not keep the women from voting. As a rule they voted early. At Cleveland, in ward 3, precinct B, a sensation was created by the appearance of a woman on a bicycle and gmoking a cigarette. She boldly appeared at the booth and was, of oourie, accorded tha right to rote. In Colurabui it i» estimated that 1,000 •womsu voted. They turned out in ffr»at numb«r» in Galllpolis. At Toledo three-fourthi of the women'* votes w«re polled by S o'clock. Wom«n were at every precinct with tea and f ing-er enko for distribution. At Younffitown the women raihed to tha polli at 6 •'clock, notwithstanding- » itcady rainfall, and fully l,»0 voted durtag the •ay, B*rn»t Ulrli Kid* Im Omrrl»(t»«- The women had carriage* at Woo«ter and hauled invalid women and bnjy Mrvant (flrli and washerwomen to the polls, so animated waa the school board flfht. Th« same hustling methods were •mployed at Akron. At Dayton 1,000 women voted before noon, their ballot* being largely republican. The women cut a small figure at Springfield. At Hamilton 1,000 had registered, but not one-half of them voted. None electioneered at the polls. Rwralt Im »>• •••*•. CiJCcnwATi, April I—Adrlces to the Tribune show that Monday's eleetion brought out a large rot« in Columbus, Cleveland, Toledo' and Hamilton and in a few smaller cities. Bo- turns are not in and majorities are not given. In the majority of places, however, the vote was light, McEisson (rep.) WM elected mayor of Cleveland and P. P. Mast (rep.) mayor of Springs- field. The democrat* elected Tauey mayor at Middletown. Hamilton, was swept by the democrats, the republicans electing only the assessor. At Toledo the republicans elected the mayor -and most of the city 'ticket Kepublicans carried Cadiz, and the new council is pledged to abolish saloons. Republican mayors were • elected • in- Niles. Zanesville, Alliance, Warren, Bellaire and Youngstown. -.! Cotton H. Allen,- democratic candidate for mayor, was elected in Colmn-" bus by 3,000 plurality, receiving almost as many votes as nia competitors combined. The vote reached 23,000. D. E. Williams, a democrat holding office under the administration, was • an independent candidate and received over 3,000 votes. The entire democrat ticket was elected. Pomeroy elected a democratic mayor. Lima elected republican municipal officers. At Bellefontaine Mrs. Margaret Cbalfant was elected to the school board by 827 majority, the largest ever given in that city. The city went republican. The democrats made big gains at Marysville. The women fought each other savagely at Bowling Oreeu. Mrs. Eliza Uaskell and •Mrs. Kate Reider, republicans, defeated the two democratic women candidates. Urbana went republican. Middletown democrats made a clean sweep. Findlay republicans elected their entire ticket. Five women .candidates were defeated. The democrats swept, Millersburg: UliiiolH uiid Iowa. CALKSBUHO, 111., April 2.— Henry Crane, people's candidate for mayor, was elected in Oneida. In Yates City C. II. Witineycr and H. J. Truitt were tied for mayor. They drew cuts and .Witmever won. ; BLOO.MINQTOS, 111., April 2.— The citizens' or A. P. A. ticket was elected by a majority of from 300 to 400. A large majority of women voted the A. P. A. ticket. ' The proposition to issue S40, 000 of bonds for a new high school building carried. The result gives the A. P. A. control of the school board by one majority. DUBUQUT,, la., April 2.— Ollnger, democratic and citizens' candidate, is ejected mayor. The remainder of the ticket is about evenly divided between democrats and citizens. KKOKUK, la., April 2.— In the city election the republicanselected mayor, judge of the superior court, assessor and four of six aldermen. Democrats elected city marshal and two aldermen. EvANSVitLE, Ind., April 2. —After the bitterest struggle in the history of politics in Evansville, Mayor [law kins, republican, was elected for a- second term of two .years Monday. His plurality is 430. The republicans also elect the four councilmeu at large and lour of the seven ward councilmen. JHlchlc.-'Q Ketorim. 'DKTiiOlT, -Mich.. April 2.— With one precinct in the city missing, Whelan (rep.) is elected police justice by about3,r>00 plurality. The republican candidates on the state. ticket. have run some 000. or TOO behind Whelan. M.eGrath has run ahead of hjs .ticket in the state v but Moore, for justice of the supreme court, will have a plurality of about 25,000. The returns continue to show an extremels' light vote. In this election a justice of the supreme court and two regents of the state university-were to be elected, n member of congress from the Third district ' to succeed • Julius Ctosa-r Burrows, recently elected senator, and minor local officials. While the returns are extremely incag- er as yet, it is certain that Moore (rep.) for supreme court justice is elected by over 20,000 majority. The regents of the state university elected are Boger Butterfield, of Grand Bapids, and Charles H. Hackley, the millionaire lumberman from Muskegon. Manistee went democratic and Lud- infi-ton republican. J. M. Turner, re- 'publican and silver candidate for mayor of Lansing, is elected by 906 majority. Traverse City gave a republican majority of 500. In Grand Rapids, Stebbins (dem.) for mayor defeated Watkins (rep.) by 2,000. A year ago Fisher (rep.) carried the city by 1,000. All tha freo silver republicans voted for Stebbins. Lanilng republicans made a clean sweep, electing every man on their ticket, gaining city clerk, city treasurer and four aldermen. James M. Turner, who was defeated for governor in 1890, wa« elected ma^or on a free sUver platform by 900 plurality. Republicans were victorious in Holland, Benton Harbor, St. Joseph, Niles and Jsckaon, while the democrats won in Bay .City and Muskegon. MUaM Kl«ct«fl to CMCrtW- KALAMAIOO, Mich., April 3.— Lieut. Gov. Miluei (rep.) is .elected to congress .to succeed Senator J. C. Burrows from the Third district by about 1,800 majority over A, M. Todd, prohibition. democrat and free silver. XonlBttlou for' FotCinaiur. WASHTJCOTOS, April 2.— The president -has appointed Caleb B.'. Barrett postmMter at Salt Lake City, vice A. ; H. Nash, removed. The president slso appointed nineteen postmasters in cities where offices have became presidential. All of the appointees have been holding under fourth-class appointments. _ Carrlaf* Manufacturer* A»lr°- CiSCTSXATl, April 2. -George C. Miller*' Sons, the .pioneer carriage mann- facturers of this city, assigned Tuesday morning with''pre/erences. The assets and liabilities will be about equal— be- tweeen »20,eoO and $30,000. The immediate cause of the failure was the Commercial bank crash. _ Fmldaot GODO to Woodley. -WASHiseTOS, April 2.— The president's family left the white house after luncheon Tuesday and took up their residence at Woodley, their suburban place, where they were joined by the president later in the afternoon. A BAD WEECK. Occurs on the Maine Central Road —The Worst on Record. Fireman If Killed and Other Railroad Men Severely Hurt—Pasi«nger$ Miraculously E»c«pe. BAXOOB. Me., April 2.— Maine Central train No. 9S, which left Batigor at 6:45 o'clock Tuesday morning carrying local passengers to Old Town, liangor and Aristook, through passengers for Houlton and Caribou, crashed into train Xo. 64, tlie night express from St. John, X. B., which was ninety minutes late. The collision occurred on a down . grade 3 miles above this city. The outgoing train was' a heavy one and was drawn by two engines. The conductor had orders to cross the St. John express at- Vea/.ie, 1 mile beyond where the accident occurred. But the conductor of the express had received no crossing orders, aud therefore supposed he had the right of way osusuaJ. As it happened both trains were running slowly at the time of the collision. Fireman lx lillU-d. The three engineers and three firemen jumped, and all escaped with bruises except James Ward, of Bangor, fireman of the express, who was caught beneath the debris of a postal car which shot out past his engine and was instantly killed. Baggagemaster Eben Shaw jumped and was severely hurt. Postal Clerks Caleb F. Palmer and Frederick S. Woodbury. of liangor, were buried in the wreckage, and the bun tors' between which they were caught were scarcely more than a foot apart. They -were considerably crushed, ranch bruised, and were rescued with difficulty, but no bones were broken. Funnel) KIT Hurt. Henry A. Appleton, of Bangor, jumped from a train when the crash came, sustaining a compound fracture of the left leg above the ankle, the bone protruding several inches through the flesh. No other passengers were much hurt. Worst Wreck on Record. The three engines wen- telescoped and crushed, also a postal car and a baggage car were smashed into splinters und several other curs were damaged. It is "the worst wreck that ever occurred on the main line of Maine Central road east oi Bangor. LOSSES BY pifiES. The Flcurcn Tor the Mr«t Tbroo Months of the Year Are Larfre- CHICAGO, April 2,— Fire losses in the country for the month of March and for the quarter ending March 31 are appalling in their aggregate. A careful estimate of fire losses for March foots up SH,0, r .2.308. Of this amount 86,630,000 was in largo fires and §8,022,308 in fires where the loss was less than 8100,000 in each instance. The fire waste for the three months amounts to 887.121,786. Taking this as an average, :1895 will show a total fire loss of 3152,437,144. Comparing tha losses -with March, 1804, there is shown an increase of nearly 52,000,000, For that year the louses amounted to 312,917,725. HOWGATE AGAIN INDICTED. Ctutrgc* Inclnd* Bmb«nl*n>«nt, Forgery »nd FkUlflotlon of Account*. * "WAStiNOToy, April; 2.— Capt. Howgate has been indicted for alleged fraud* on the government during the time he wa» disbursing 1 officer of the signal serrioe. The new indictments are three in number. One alleges forgery of a 84,000 account with the American Union Telegraph company in 1675, another charges embezzlement and 'the third falsification of accounts. Uarry Roach'* Bodr Found. IxDUJr-i.rol.is, Ind., April 3.— W. J. Roach, a well-known lumber merchant of this city, has received word from Webb City, Mo,, that the remains of hi« son Harry, ag«d 25 years, who was killed by a cave-in in the lead mines near that -place in May, 1892, hare unexpectedly been found 180 feet below the Burfao* and 250 feet back of the point where he was carried down. Took HI* BedfrlloWi 1.1 f«. "WICHITA, Kin., April 2.— A special from Wotonga, O. T., wy«: "Al Ev»o» »nd Dr. Btbb. bedfellows la » howl, (juirrtlwl orer tbo proper dM»ion of th« bedeloWklDf, »a<l ETWH, dr»wlnc » re- volTir from under the pillow, shot ud killed B»bb. When Sheriff Wilson tried to arrwt Evani he WM »&ot twtee, Irak nn»lly ineoeeded in an-Mtlng th« murderer. Wllson'i wound* »r« Q«I ikoutht to be fat»L EruuU»de«- pe»4a. His Identity at ttrsr WM unknown." GiorjIlTSouttnini {told. MACOS, Ga., April 2.— The Georgia Southern & Florida railroad was sold Tuesday at receiver's sale. The property was bid in at »3,000,000 by Skipworth Wilmer, attorney for the bondholders' committee. _ Ha toll I Giro, a Dinner. WASHINGTON. April 2.— Mgr. Satolli, the papal legate, gave a dinner Tues- dav to a number of the local clergy in honor of his patron saint, St. Francis. INDIANA NEWS. Told in Brief by Dispatches from Various Localities. ordinary Pin* of COUCH*!* , Ind., April 2.—Thomson Arnold, of the wrecked bank of James Arnold & Co., South Whitley. which failed in 1893 with liabilities of S130,- 000 and no assets, was found puilty December 4 of receiving deposits when he knew the tank was insolvent and sentenced to a year in the pi'!iiio»u:iry. iSow his attorneys have discovered that the statutory penalty for the crime is not le>s than two years in tha penitentiary, and they are asking- for a ne«' trial on the extraordinary plea that their client was not friven a longer term in the penitentiary. The bir- cuit jud^e lias the matter under advise- rnent, ItottlK Found Afu-r Six Your*. 'SVABASH, Ind.. April 0.—Gertrude Al- pnu£li, a younsf lady of Andrews, 11 miles oast of this city, ,lune IS, 1SS9, wrote her name on a slip of paper with a request to the person finding it to write her. This she .sealed in a bottlo and threw into the \Vabash river. Tho bottle, which had drifted for nearly six years, was found Monday at Lockport. 19 miles west'of Log-ausport, by a young man, who removed the paper and with a letter returned the slip U» Miss Alpaugh. ; Goilio Settle* a C l:i I in. WABASH, Ind.. April 2.—One night last October a special train bearing George Gould and party ran into a ear- riag-e owned by George .lonesatRoann, Ivilling Jones and his team. Mrs. Jones sued for Si0,000 and the Wabash road agreed to pay her 53,000. She would not accept less than $5,200, and George Gould offered to pay Mrs. Jones the difference of Sl-,000, which was accepted. Slnril«'ri>il by l<~»oi|in<ln. MI;SCIK. Jnd.. April - J. -John Suuder- land. a farmer, found the remains of Joseph Bright., aged 4$, by the roadside .'t luijc.s MjHihwost of Muncie. JJrijrht, was in Muneie intoxicated Safc- in-day night anil exhibited considerable money. It is believed that footpads murdered and robbed him wbilo' on his way home in a wagon. , ru>m:d tliu Century Mark. JEFFERSON-VILI,B, Ind.. April 3.—Daniel 13augh, residing near the Kentucky and Indiana cement mills, 5 miles from the city, celebrated his lOCth birthday- Monday, lie w: s born April 1, 1739, in "W'yeth county, "\.". Va. Ue is as bright mentally as lie was fifty years ago, and he gets about with wonderful spright- Imess. ' . ' Pcrpottml Motion. ' Lx POBTK, Jnd.. April 2.—Martu*- Kesslcr, living- near Rochester, Fulton county, believes that he has solved the ' problem of perpetual motion. He has i invented a machine with sufficient ' power to drive a sewing machine, which, propelled by the mysterious force, runs steadily, lie declines to share his secret. A Kumor Denied. LA POUTK, Ind., April 5.— Assistant Soperintendent Lee, of the Michigan Central Railroad company, has authorized a denial of the rumor that the headquarters of the western division of the road will be moved from Michigan City to Xiles. No change is under contemplation. • _ _,» Gray Racing BUI ALBANY, N. V., April 2.— The Gray racing bill, as reported from the codes committee, has passed the amsembly by a vote of 32 to 11. CaM* Ended at Lait. FRJLNKFORT, Ind,, April 2.—The las* oi the celebrated Coleman coses, th»t ot Cordelia Coleman vs. her divorced husband, William Coleman, f Sf *5,000 for false imprisonment, was dismissed here. The Colemans, who are very wealthy, have been fighting in th« courts for four years. That L«Klilatlv» Riot. TifDiA.ifApoi.ls, Ind., April 8.—Juclgt McCrary, of the criminal court, Monday instructed the county grand jury to inquire into the circumstance* «t- landing- tha legislative riot on th« elosing' nig-ht of the BCMion- H«ld for Trial. ELWOOD, Ind., April 2. — Mickla Shaw, of this placci-bas been arrested. on a cti&rge of connection with the Foust murder and will be held to wait the outcome of the Hiers' trial. ther arrests will be made. Killed In a Runaway. WAJSASH, Ind., April Z.—Jefferson Calhoun, living 1 3 miles west of Elcb Valley, was instantly killed in » run»— . way accident. His horses were friffht- ened at escaping steam from a Wabaah locomotive. Breach of FromlM. , Ind., April 2.—James 8. ,, ex-county auditor and proolJ- nentin politicii, was made the defend- mut in a »10,000 suit for breach of prom- ; ise filed by Miss Katie DauR-herty, aged • 17 years. ; IJeal JTalu Tnrou^h. AFIIXTOX, Wis., April 2.—The options held by a syndicate on fifty Wi«-f - consin paper mills has expired, and the proposed 510,000,000 deal has fallen 1 . through. Failure to secure promised' , Xnjrlish capital is believed to be the cause. '- '• Apportionment Declare*! CoaitltoUon*!.' SPJUXCFtEiD, IU-. April 2.—The Illi-' nois supreme court, in an opinion filed Tuesday morning, decides the demo-* cratic apportionment of 1893 conrtita-t.

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