The Ottawa Journal from Ottawa,  on November 23, 1977 · Page 67
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The Ottawa Journal from Ottawa, · Page 67

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Ottawa, Canada
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Wednesday, November 23, 1977
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Page 67
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-Wednesday, November 23, 1 977 OtUw$ Joanud 67 OTTAWA FLOSSIE 0.45 PM ANO 8.50 PM Documentary misses out royally iuwch r.oo rm AMD 10.00 PM )WMQ i She turned on ; i .1.-1 . I uwireai uwii f .""you. COM! Brian O'tAoara views the tube seems like a history lesson pitched at grade school "children. Monarchists will not be Impressed except maybe for the shots of the Queen in conversation; anti-monarchists will be annoyed. It's too bad because Jeannine Locke, the producer-director of The Canadian Monarchy has produced some good programs including a documentary about Prince Charles called The Family Prince, whfch was a . sensitive portrait that revealed a human side of the royal family rarely seen in films. Monarchy rarely delves below the surface. The on-camera narrator is historian Jacques .Monet, a Jesuit, and he is clearly enamoured with the institution of monarchy. And that's all right as long as it doesn't cloud his judgment. According to Monet, the monarchy is the symbol of "conciliation and reconciliation" that's at the heart of the Canadian experience while current Quebec attitudes are the product of "self-centred national-Ism." The documenatary seems to suggest that the Quebec people also love the royalty, that Quebe-cois have always supported the institutions of monarchy, except in recent times. Many Quebecois might records a conversation on the grounds of Rideau Hall during which the Queen, Prince Philip and their excellencies chat about dogs, trees, totem poles, Prince Andrew's skating abilities and Canadian geese. The program attempts to convey the impression that the Royal Family are just plain folks. But it doesn't work. Outside of the obvious constitutional, political and historical framework, the institution of the monarchy means what people perceive it to mean. I would like to know what Bill Davis, Allan Blakeney, Claude Ryan, Claude Morin and a few Intelligent people who make up the 6o-called masses think about the monarchy today. This program won't tell the viewer a thing he doesn't ' already know. At times it sounds like a travelogue filler at a local movie theatre. At other times it WWSlkl8tARS! CINEMA SHOWCASE mi mm A Celebration of Life .1 '.... Allan Rings Film I If MEET T1IOJ Mi! if I I I Al ""SIIERS. SIM FREAKS 11. I I I Wl and GUVS i ORIS IW I I J LOWUNSf Ml THRILLS'. I The CBC'8 latest con trlbutlon to Canadian unity will be telecast tonight at : 30 The Canadian Monarchy; Louis XIV to 'Elizabeth II. The documentary is framed by the recent royal visit to Canada, , beginning with . the preparations for the visit and concluding with a film of the royal couple walking the grounds of Ri-deau Hall accompanied by the Governor General and Madame Leger. But It's supposed to be the history of the monarchy in Canada from Louis XIV to the present. And It's neither a good documentary nor particularly good television. It's closer to propaganda than to history. The program avoids tough questions; itdoens't examine the role of the monarchy; it merely presents selected historical data using paintings, photographs and. old film footage. The Canadian OE3 Dinah Christie & Tom Kneebone Canada's Foremost Cabaret Entartalnarsl- "l Hughtdl I'moyd ana I toaf conflovtif ki aylnoOo j'outeOkV aManfoy." Maureen Peterson Ottawa Journal HELD OVER by popular demand until Sat Dec 3 NOW PLAYING Tuesday thru Saturday f-iaaat traits see -X- site of W O. Mitchell's classic novel Starring Gordon Pinsent and Jose Ferrer Introducing Brian Painchaud Place deVllle I ooors open nkjhtlv at 6.45 f I FEATURE AT 7 25 ANO 9 20 PM tTw Passions and Doug Junor Week nightly at 7.25 and 0.20 ciVfon mm-. k m. m. tt iik vr it 1 - lirZlm mmr ? mi A "J rFni little documented evidence in support of its contentions. One film clip shows the Queen Mother being escorted up some steps by Montreal Mayor Camille Houde during the forties. Houde is an ironic choice to back the thesis, as he spent the latter part of the Second World War in jail because he opposed conscription. Most Canadians will agree With Monet when he states that, "the Crown is a vital part of our sys-. tern." They would also agree if he said milk is sold in supermarkets. That the monarchy is a unifying force and the Queen is the "symbolic head of our whole family" may be true in theory, but is not quite as self-evident in reality. This film is just too pat; ' its conclusions are too easy and are not held up to objective scrutiny; it lacks cerebral - muscle. The CBC's Canada's New Quebec telecast in September was a sensitive documentary informed by an acute intelligence. It utilized various elements and techniques and fused them into a coherent, balanced whole. The docu-mentray looked at the Quebec situation from many sides. And it was a fine, informative program. The Canadian Monarchy has Prime Minister Trudeau explain the role of the Crown in a parliamentary system; it interviews Madame Leger and "e'ou mm ;4IED iVyM;'ari''aJ " I Canadian TV film awarded an Emmy NEW YORK (CP Henry Ford's America, a Canadian documentary by filmmaker Donald Brittain, was awarded an international Emmy Monday night and former CBC President Alphonse Ouimet was honored with a special award. The International Council of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences named Henry Ford's America as the best non-fiction television film.. The top prize in the fiction class went to Harold Pinter's The Collection, a British film produced by Granada Television Ltd. . Henry Ford's America, co-produced by CBC-TV and the National Film Board, was originally telecast in Canada on Nov. 28, 1976. It was given the top non-fiction prize at the fifth annual international emmy awards here and Brittain was on hand to accept it. He wrote, narrated and . directed as well as produced the 58-minute Film. It explores the automobile as the cornerstone of 20th-century North American life. In a candid interview with Brittain, Henry Ford II documents the turbulent history of the Ford Motor Co. While the first half of the film captures the inner workings of the Ford dynasty and its corporate empire, the second part portrays the America which has resulted from this machine, an instrument of death for two million Americans. K Piacedeville2 DOORS OPEN HBHRV AT 46 PtUf e!!!I83'?"JiPiniTT"MMMiMaiMl I IX. II 7th CAR! RUN! ft DAILY AT ' 1.30 3.20 5.15 7.15 9.20 Capitol square i Britannia six "The charm of this French comedy lies in its sensitivity to the joys of lifeon all levels this film is a winneri" ji mill mrr mm Mrs magazine tnglishSuWJUPS 1.40 3.30 5.25 7.20 9.20 Capitol Square 2 THIS WEEK MAJOR HODPLE immVm' 1 argue with Monet's and producer Jeannine Locke's expressed vison of history. It's one thing to turn out in large numbers to see the pomp and ceremony of a royal entourage, it's quite another to believe in the institution and support it. It's one thing to take the kids to a Santa Claus parade; another to believe in Santa Claus. But Monet makes the jump. At any rate the program offers VISITORS Opening Night Sold To Simpsons-Sears AS Seats RoMrvtd Ticket Outtots CIVIC CENTRE BOX OFFICE Lansdowne Paffc SIMPSONS-SEARS CarHngwood SI. 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