The Record from Hackensack, New Jersey on October 14, 1996 · 69
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Record from Hackensack, New Jersey · 69

Publication:
Location:
Hackensack, New Jersey
Issue Date:
Monday, October 14, 1996
Page:
69
Start Free Trial
Cancel

FILM ALL PAGES momsonV latest Two long-awaited disks from The Doors -"Absolutely Live" and "The Doors' Greatest Hits" - reach record stores Tuesday. The latter, previously available only in Europe, will be released as an enhanced CD containing the "Ghost Song" video and interactive features. THE RECORD Monday October 14,1996 Entertainment and leisure every day Mil WD IS prime viewing Spelling's 'Heaven' a surprise G CO pG O CO 2 BP f t 5 V 3f Can you picture the meeting where producer Aaron Spelling known for his babe-laced series (from "Charlie's An gels" to "Melrose Place") pitched the "7th Heaven" concept? "No, it doesn't have women in Lycra or shirtless hunks. Affairs? Nope. It's got Stephen Collins, king of miniser-ies, but this time, he's a, well, minister who loves his wife and five kids. This functional family just wants to have a happy, productive life." The bigger surprise? "7th Heaven," airing at 8 p.m. Mondays on WBChannel 11, is pretty good. In fact, it's one of the few new shows to get glowing reviews this fall. Tonight's episode, "The Color of God," is an unusuai one about the aftermath of the burning of a smalltown black church. Eric, Collins' minister character, leams it's the church of his old seminary school pal (guest star Dorian Harewood), and that the arsonist has vowed to return to torch the adjoining house. Eric invites the minister's family to take shelter in his home. The younger kids hit it off right away. The teens are more leery of one another. "7th Heaven" can sometimes be overly earnest, and its image of family life is wishfully idyllic... Still, much rings true about this series. "7th Heaven" can sometimes be overly earnest, and its image of family life is wishfully idyllic. (Regular sit-down dinners, none of them microwaved.) Eric's wife, Annie (Catherine Hicks), is a tad too agreeable, and meticulously dressed, for a woman with a huge house and five kids to tend. Still, much rings true about this series, which deserves praise for tackling tough issues. It's also nice to see a married couple who are still in love, kids who get rambunctious but aren't terribly disrespectful and everybody getting dressed up for church on Sundays. Tuesday night (10 p.m., ABC), "NYPD Blue" finally has its fourth-season premiere. Among the doings: After the death of his older son, Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz) is obsessed about his baby's health. Bobby Simone (Jimmy Smits) gets more serious with Diane Russell (Kim Delaney), Greg Medavoy (Gordon Clapp) frets over a weight gain, and James Martinez (Nicholas Turturro) becomes entranced by a new office assistant. Some nice moments there, but, to me, the episode lacks the punch of other "Blue" season openers. And on Sunday, a loudly trumpeted swan song begins. "Danielle Steele's The Ring,' " a two-pa rter continuing at 9 p.m. the following night, marks the 20th, and final, Steele novel to be produced by NBC. NastasHja Kinski ("Tens") ploys Arinna von Gotthard, a woman who Is fiercely determined to find her family, from whom she was torn at the start of World War II. It's a typically Steole-y story, full of twists, turns, tragedy, and gorgeous peoplo. If you've enjoyed NBC's Steele franchise, It's quite a parting shot. You can call Virginia Rohan at 640-4280, (ax her at 846-4047, write her at Tha Record. 150 River St., Hackensack, N.J. 07601, or lend mall to her at ncwsroomborgen-record.com. TWT u eann her --or hfhTQ Chiara Mastroianni has Dad's looks, and a double dose of acting talent i By VIRGINIA ROHAN Staff Writer If you were the daughter of Catherine Deneuve, the legendarily beautiful French actress, you probably wouldn't want to keep hearing that you look just like your father. For Chiara Mastroianni, however, there is no shallow end of the gene pool. She is the offspring of Deneuve and renowned, ever-dashing Italian actor Marcello Mastroianni whom Chiara strongly resembles. "I did a deal with myself, that I have to put up with hearing that until I die," Chiara Mastroianni says with a laugh. "I'm used to it, and I guess I'm going to be used to it for the 50 years that are coming, so it's all right." On this recent day, the refreshingly candid 24-year-old Parisian actress is settled in an elegantly appointed restaurant in New York's Peninsula Hotel, on a promotional tour for her new film "Three Lives & Only One Death," which she made with her father. Press notes describe the film, directed by Chilean-born, Paris-based Raul Ruiz, as an "offbeat urban fairy tale' ... about "multiple personalities and social dissonance." Indeed, "Three Lives" is a subtitled adventure in surrealism, best enjoyed if one resists all attempts to make sense of it. "When you see this kind of movie, you have to allow your own imagination to fly away, and not to look for very realistic and credible things," Mastroianni says. "You have to ... just let yourself go. It's like a dream, like a fantasy." Her father, who's now 72, appears in all four of the movie's tales, playing four peculiar characters. Chiara Mastroianni appears in the third See CHIARA Page YT-2 'Toon boom animates their lives By BOB IVRY Staff Writer Like the cartoon characters they bring to the screen, Zac Moncrief and Mike Milo lead harried, madcap lives. The two North Jersey natives, both relocated to Southern California, direct original cartoon shorts making their premieres on the Cartoon Network. But that labor is only the tip of the iceberg for the talented young animators. "The animation industry is booming right now," says Milo, 31. "Everybody in the business is working two or three jobs." "There's five major outfits doing animated feature films, plus all the TV work," says Moncrief, 24. "It doesn't leave me much time for a life." In his sparse spare time, Moncrief, a 1989 graduate of Pascack Hills High School, created the story of "Godfrey & Zeek," two buddies a giraffe and a pig who accidentally flush away their most prized possession, the TV remote control, and retrieve it at the sewage treatment plant. The seven-minute cartoon airs at 9 p.m. Wednesday, 11 p.m. Saturday, and 3 p.m. Sunday. If viewer response is positive, Moncrief may be asked to develop the short into a series. "It takes most characters three or four shows to define themselves, even to their creators," Moncrief says. "I'd love to develop Godfrey and Zeek further." Moncrief was doing grunt work as an "in-betweener" for Turner Broadcasting when Hanna-Barbera, the preeminent TV cartoon company, bought his "Godfrey & Zeek" idea. An in-betweener, Moncrief explains, is an entry-level animator who does the most See ANIMATORS Page YT-7 day planner FAIRS Bcrgcnficld Street Festival, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 387-8300. ON LINE Actress Mcl Harris ("Something So Right"), 6 p.m., Prodigy. Jump: Chat. Actress Piper Laurie ("ER"), 7 p.m., AOL. Keyword: Oldsmobilo. TELEVISION "A Streetcar Named Desire," 6 p.m., AMC. Football, San Francisco vs. Green Boy, 9 p.m., ABC. advice Dear Abby, Ann Landers, and Jeane Dixon share their insights on getting through the day. ps 8 styles today After a slow start, the Jogbra has raced to a commanding lead In the world of sport fashion. pg3

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 18,700+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Record
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free