Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California on October 14, 1961 · Page 5
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Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California · Page 5

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Saturday, October 14, 1961
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Local A/of es| Desert air pours over Redlands, Mercury hits 96 at 11 o'clod Pigeon Races First laces of the season will be held by the Redlands Racing Pigeon club tomorrow from Niland. An Unusual Gift For a little girl — Zebra striped kitten. 3 months old. Cute and lovable! Found on my lawn but 1 can't keep her! PY 2-4676. x Desert air poured over Redlands again today raising the termpera- ture to 96 degrees by 11:10 a.m. and holding the relative humidity down to a dry 15 per cent. Tomorrow will be only a de- through the chaparral. At the same time the summer' spell gave Redlands pleasant weatlier last evening for being in patios and otherwise out of doors. The minimum this morning was Firemen Standby igree or two less hoi accordinglse degrees — the same as yes- lledlands firemen stood by alito the U.S. Weather Bureau cen-jlerday. n;24 a.m. loday for a controlled Iter at Pomona. ' With the return to Pacific Stand- burn of waste material at Grand' .\t the same time, heal wa.s,ard Time, and the advancing sea- Contral Rocket compyn\. Iblistering along the coast. By 11 son. the peak temperatures are- :a.ni. it was 100 degrees at Los:now comino "ihortlv after 1 pm anticipated light to moder- i.Angeles Airport. 104 degrees at;with a cooling trend soon after>'e eye irritation from smog in ^->' Long Beach. 9!) al .San Diego, and^ ' it will be slightly cooler near the coast Sunday. There will be dry gusty easterly winds in the mountains today with high file danger. The mercury at Los Angeles Civic Center today was expected to reach 100—comoared with 96 Friday. City airport report ready for Council Whether it is feasible for the city to operate Redlands Airport as a municipal facility will be answered Tuesday Miien a special airport study is submitted to the City Council. The report, prepared by city per-; sonnel director Martin McMillan, was described as an "e-xcellent " . „ ,, .. ,. , 1 r»v 'and comprehensive study" by City The Air Polluliou Control D's-,Manager Fred Workman. Just Arrived! Buicks revolutionary new- Cause of the land-to-sea air flow By United Press International It will be sunny today and Sun- i.lday in Southern California but with some patchy coastal fog Sunday. Slightly warmer weather is forecast for interior sections todav and ^aS ^C^e 'ln ^^'t^^/i;,,^'^^--, f vast high pressure area over- seif this e.xcx.edh,g.y econoinical -^^^ much of the West, yet higl, performing forerunner of| ^yj,,, (he dcserl winds came hi-h 6 cylinder cars. First '"me 'n;nre hazard. Now in the lid day America for passenger cars. Bert;,|,„ c.,,,,. .„„ ""^ S. llatficld. Buick, 112 W. State!£ ^jand high temperature add to the Chest Board To Meet 1 1'"^^'"'' if fames should start. The Community Chest board of f^^'J' ^^''"ds could drive them directors will hold a regular meeting Monday noon at the MVCA j In addition to campaign business.! the board will consider a request from the YMCA for an emergency appropriation of S350 to replace the furnace and the YWCA wiU request a review of its '"fuian- cial predicament." Camera Club Meeting Kcdlmid.': Camera club v.ill meet al 7:30 Jlonday evening in the board room ot ricdiands puhlic .schools. There will be iialuro picture CDnipclilioii anil the public is invjied. Pappy Norstad Dies Magnus L. iPop' Xorstad of Oak Clen died last night. The family has indicated that there uill be no pubhc services. Miller Funeral Funeral services for .Mrs. Isa Waters Miller m\] be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon from the F. Arthur Cortner chapel. Mrs. Henry Schlag. reader of the Christian Science church will conduct the ser\ices. Intenneni will be in Hillside Memorial Park. When the contents of the report the coastal and central regions of^ai'e revealed next week, it re- the Los Angeles Basin. jportedly will recommend that at Representative high tempera-i'eas'a small scale municipal air- tures Thursday and forecast highs iP"""' started - -• today included: Long Beach 98-102, Santa Monica 88-88. Burbank 9698. Mount Wilson 80-85, Palmdale 85-89, Riverside 94-98. Palm Springs 99-102. Bakersfield 89-94, San Diego 86-88 and Santa Barbara 90-86. Search on for dog in Barton Flats area A large dog. described as a black Labrador Retriever, has been the subject of a search m the Barton Flats area, according to Redlands police. The owner. Bruce Farrow of South Pasadena, reported the dog got away from him last week^ v.liile he was on a motor trip in! the mountains. He has returned j this weekend to conduct a search! for the dog in the areas where' he was reported seen. j Cooperating in the search arc; I'.S. Forest Service employes.! sheriff's officers, game wardens | and residents of the Barton Flats area. Mr. Farrow said the dog i.* friendly, licensed and vaccinated and his name is •"Mike" TOURIST ATTRACTION — Now under construction at Las Vegas by L. P. Scherer's Fremont company is this tall tower which is expected to be o major tourist attraction. There will be a casino and a sky room at the top, and hotel rooms in the tower, proper. Earthmoving equipment list to be provided initially. A long- range program is also outlined. The report represents an extensive study of an earlier report presented to the Council by representatives of the Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber deemed conversion of Redlands Airport to a municipal facility to accommo date business and executive aircraft as essential to Redlands' future economic development. McMillan stated that after making his own study, he is now in a position to make a firm recommendation to the Council on city participation in a municipal air-' port. He said the report will spell out required airport improvements, the precise contract needed between the city and the present possible methods of fi- A complete list of heavy earthmoving equipment owned by members of I he Engineering and Grading Contractors .Association in this owners, area will soon be placed in thcjuancing improvements and an esti- hands of Civil Defense authori-imation of the costs involved, ties according to an association! The Council ordered the airport spokesman. j.study in July, after a tour of "In the event of an atomic!a'''PO''ts in neighboring communi- blast. such equipment would be ties showed that the most signifi- needed at once to clear streets, cant a.spect of the.se airports was repair roads, knock down unsafe 'he amount of industrial develop- structures. and other important iment around them, work to restore communications! Workman has asked the Council and Iransixirtation." he said.ilo give the report a thorough "Heuvv bulldozers, rippers, shov-istudy so that it can be consid- Redlands Daily Facts Saturday, Oct. H 1961-5 Nine on Superior Court Jury panel Superior Court jui-ies impaneled Tuesday included nine persons from Redlands. Local residents who began jury duty were Mildred ,1. Cunimings, 903 Ea.st Citrus; Robert T. Baker, 1201 Cedar avenue; Florence McCrca. .114 N'ordina .street: If. W. Preston. 1030 Lugonia avenue. And Carmen Benzor. 521 Lawton street: Harold E. Terry Sr., 523 West Pioneer: Emil M. Pray, 934 Campus avenue: Bird L. Woods, 628 Orchard drive: and George C. Cureton, 715 Brookside avenue. Idella A. Loucks. 24399 Central avenue. Loma Linda, and Alcne McCormick, 1283 Tourmaline avenue, Mentone, were also impaneled. School lunch week school menu els. and other such equipment could he pressed into service to construct shelters quickly in event of an imijending attack. 'The complete list of the equipment now in the hands of all E(iC.\ members in the area, as well as qualified operators, will be put into the hands of the cities and the county. 'Because of the proximity to March and Norton Air Bases, it IS felt that the ti-i-city area may be a prime target for enemy attack. Hence the EGCA which is an organization of state-licen.sed earthmoving. grading and paving contractors, has organized its own civil defense committee for the purpose of having its heavy earth machinery on constant stand-by should an attack take place. ered al an early date. Scfterer building Las Vegas Landmark Tower Eisenhower marks 71st birthday GETTYSBURG, Pa. ll'Pli Former President Dvviglit D. Eisenhower celebrated his 71st birthday today by playing bridge with house guests at his farm. L. P. Scherer's Fremont Con-'mark Tower project will raise ai Eisenhower, looking trim and , struclion company currently hasi287 foot column which the pro-, fit, planned a quiet day after at- Vi4 #il RA#>ArHc i contracts for two large aparlmenti meters say will be "the marvel tending a .special "theater" per- WlTQI IVCwwl Ua j houses and the spectacular Land-; of the desert." With 20 floors it formancc staged by his three mark Tower in Las Vegas. N'e-|Will have some rooms for the ad-j granddaughters and directed by vadu. Ijacent Landmark hotel. At theihis grandson Friday night. Mr! Scherer is the widely known; top will be a restaurant, casino, file former Chief Executive. DEATHS AMBROSE — Died in :\lt. Ver non, Washington. Oct. 13. 1961.| f^etjiands building contractor. Hejand panorama lounge. |„.|io underwent his annual physi- Mrs. Clara Ambrose, aged 85; ^,.5 S(.he,.er divide their time | ]„sicie, the elevator will give cal checkup Tuesday at Walter years, native 01 Oarnctt. Kan-;jjgi^^.ge„ t|,ej,. permanent home: fioor.tg.noor service. Outside, an Reed Army .Medical Center in sas and a tormcr resident ol;|,p,.g 3,,^ ^^^^ Nevada resort city. 1 gn .gigss express will rise, express. Washington. D.C., told reporters Started two weeks ago under;f,.;,,.,! gi.ound to casino. [he felt "pretty lucky" even Redlands. Deceased is survived by one sis-' ler. i\Iiss Ada B. Philips, of .Mt., \'ernon. Washington: two brothers.: Alfred Pbilins. Cheney. Washington and Dr. C. S. Philips. ,Mt.: Vernon. Washington. Graveside services will be heldj a'. 11 o'clock Tuesday morning at Hillside Memorial Park. F Ar Ihur Coitncr chapel in charge of- local arrangements. si.500.ono contract, the Land- Gen. Walker back in Army's good graces Last week the Fremont companyI'hougji I'e "'as celebrating his started construction on the piusli,|b"'thday vvMth his family on Fri- 3-story Somerset house, the con-i"^>' '"e 13th. ' tract being .S450.000. The first sec- Norton vaccinates against "flu bug" The flu bug is going to find mightly slim pickings at Norton Air Force base this year. In the face of a statement by the U.S. Public Health Service that an "upswing" in flu cases is expected this fall and winter, the medical staff at Norton base hospital is conducting a mandatory mass vaccination program for all military personnel. This tlu shot program is car ricd' out every year. There are no firm plans to extend the shots to dependents of military personnel, the office of information said. Civilian workers at the base are not eligible to receive the free shots. They will have to get shots elsewhere or take their chances with ordinary good health. Grant to give lecture at U.R. Donald Grant, honors graduate of Edinburgh University and lecturer on world affairs, currently on a tour of schools in the United States, will be featured speaker at the University of Redlands. Tuesday at 10 a.m. in Memorial Chapel. "U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. — Rivals for Leadership," will be Grant's topic. Invited by the Institute of International Education for five consecutive tours of American col- MORE WORK - When Mrs. Pearl Smith, a Community Chest fund campaigner, showed up at the Chest office and requested "more cards," Executive Director Jim Youngberry praised her for her fine work and Fred Hacquebord (left) residential solicitor provided her with more cards. Mrs. Smith is 83 years of age. (Facts photo) Redlands population estimated at 28,376 The population of Redlands is now 28.376 according to the quarterly estimate of the county planning commission. This represents an increase of 1,547 people since the U.S. Census of April 1960. Dwelling units are now estimated at 9,536, a net increase ol 456 since the official census. County estimates are based on housing. Tile October bulletin carries this footnote: "Numerous transfers of population and adjustment in vacancy factors were made this last quarter. These population changes are related to the in the .Meadovvhrook Redevelopment area of San Bernardino City and the Redlands area allowing for the construction of the freeway. These demolitions had not previously been computed in our earlier bulletins." Current estimates include: Popula- Dvvellings tion Redlands 9.536 Mentone 1.183 Yucaipa 5.763 E. Highlands . . 267 L. Linda-B. Mawr 2.293 Tile Yucaipa figures do not include the Calimesa district which 28,376 3.303 The week of October 16-20, hai been designated as "School Liincil Week" by the California School Food Service a.s.sociation. Its purpose is lo bettor acquaint the public with the school lunch program. j Type '•.•\" lunches are served ill all schools in the Redlandi ! School di.slrict. and. although co.sl- ing only 30 cents, each lunch pro- vies one-third to one-half of th« pupil's daily luitritional needs. The type "A " lunch is a pattern which all schools participating in the National School Lunch Program follow in order to be eligibla for reimbursement from the United States Department of .Agriculture. The requirements for this lunch include a two-ounce serving of protein food, "4 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or fruit or both, 1 portion enriched or whole grain bread, two teaspoons butter and pint milk. Each lunch must include a Vitamin C food. A Vitamin A food must be sened at least twice a week. 1.160 6.271 demolition of dwelling units bothlis in Riverside county. Union Oil Co. to honor Harry Scott at dinner In special recognition of his long service with the Union Oil Company. Harry S. Scott of Redlands will be a guest of the company s president Dudley Tower, at a dinner and reception Tuesday at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. All of the 103 guests are celebrating their 35th year as em­ ployes of the Union Oil company. Mr. Scott's career with the Union Oil Company began as a roustabout in the Field Department in Santa Fe Springs in Jime of 1926. Following various assignments in Field and Purchasing, he migrated to the Sales Department in 1932. At this point he served as Agent or Resident Jlanager at a he did not have long to live 1 His address is open to the pub-j number of marketing .stations, ne am noi iidve long 10 iivc. : ...jthout charee Seating will be among t'lem Whittier. Santa Ana, .Mrs. Eisenhower gave her bus-"'^ ^y™"^ Weather leges since 1936. Grant is now a "1 look forward lo every birth-ifree-lance guest lecturer in schools tion of the project will consist of;day with glee. " he said." noting|and universities of Britain. U.S. CO apartments. It was designed! that many persons in 1958 thought|and Canada, primarily to serve the city's growing cunvetniou and tourist busi- ^. ^ nexs and will have daily, week-hand a .satchel for his golf equip-'^^'aiiable "'e Chapel balcony , ly and monthly rales. '• nienl as a birthday prosenl. She To start in about one month is said it was identical to a piece kJ^.^ ICAnno«4t«'c ilhe University Apartments, with of luggase she gave him 25 years 1 IVirS* l\6nil6Qy S • 1.50 units. This is a $1,400,000 con- ago and that it was what hel ; trad. ! wanted. Rainfall Temp. 21 Hours Sept. 14 .. . .. F,q Sept. IV S6 59 Sept. IS .. fi:i 6:1 Sept. 17 78 bl Sept. 13 sn .12 Sept. 19 (10 jl Sept. 20 76 .n9 Sept. 21 w .iS Sept. 22 66 .^K '"'.01 Sept. ?T 7<. Sept. 24 91 .il Sept. 25 _ 98 .->5 Sept. 26 _. 100 .16 Sept. ?- 98 64 Sept. 28 9 .T .•59 Sept. ?•) . .. 87 .5.-? Sept. .•!0 89 52 Oct. 1 91 32 Oct. 2 100 ."15 Oct. 101 60 Oct. 4 101 61 Oct. D 90 .16 Oct. k 89 5:K Oct. . 70 .">4 Oct. 8 .. 72 SO 'Tr. Oct. 0 . 71 41 Oct. 10 . ,. ... 80 4;: Oct. 11 . . . . 0.5 46 Oct. 12 92 46 Oct. 1.1 - 98 .16 Oct. 14 96 56 Man boasts of 1 WASHINGTON 'Uri' ;Gen. Edwin Walker uas back in !lhc Army's guod graces today s-ea- fo'lowing a six-niunth conlrover.sy son over his anti-Communi.st policies. • , Beginning next month. Walker, vvill be assistant chief of staff fori • i • « ^operations in the .Army's Pacific! Tttree SlaVinaS .headquarters at Hawaii, with ex-! » ^ I'tra 'Inlies making l)im responsible! ST. PAUL. Minn. lUPP - .\\ HAVWARD Calif HPU M. C -,3,for Plans and training. ibaby-faced sexual deviate, one oIjNellie Rovve wa^entel-t'ain nl [e^^ The assignment, announced late]Hie nations 10 most wanted men,'great grand-child todav Airs Friday by Army Secretary Elvisjboasted in prison today of theiRowe is 49. ' • J. Stahr Jr., replaces one which|rape slayings of three women in Great grand- i mother at 49 vvould have sent him to the 8lh St. Paul and Spokane, Wash. Army Reserve Headquarters at Authorities said at first that Austin. Tex. The new assignment] Hugh Bion Morse, 31. had also was substantially better than the j confessed the slaying of an 8-year- rcscrve position. iold girl scout in Spokane. But The Army had no comment on|jiorse denied the killing. fjatmat WAere To F/ntf Ihmi why Walker's status had improved. However, even the official admonishment which followed his susoension from command of the 24 Division in Germany spoke of his "30-year outstanding record as a professional soldier.". It said he was a sincere, dcep-^ ' " ly religious and patriotic soldier. Morse was sleeping in his apartment, located just five blocks from the scene of the last slaying, when FBI agents came to arrest him Friday night. .Although his room was well-stocked with! he offered no resistance. Agents said Morse freely admit She is now being visited by the oldest of her four grandchildren, Jlrs. Evelyn Robinson of Corpus; Christi, Tex. Mrs. Robinson became a mother Aug. 2. ''People just won't believe I'm a great-grandmother," the trim, youthful brunette said today. "1 may be a great-great grandmother before I begin collecting Social Security." Jewelry stolen "'He'vvas'adn^nished and relieved ^: ^ Z''l^J'^'J';^^j:^::^^.:^T't°^ WEST LOS ANGELES 'UPli- slayings of Carol Ronan,i Police today sought burglars who secretary irked by criticism WASHINGTON i UPI )-Pamela Turnure. press secretary to Mrs. Kennedy, has expressed "disapproval" to the .American Institute of Decorators for the "very uncalled for" criticism of White House decorating by its president Jiilton Glaser. Glaser was quoted in a Richmond newspaper as saying "somebody got stuck" when $12,500 was paid for the antique wallpaper m- stalled in the White House diplomatic reception room. The American Society of Interior Designers purchased the wallpaper, Zuber's "Scenic America" from Peter Hill, a Washington lay preacher, at Mrs. .lacqueline Ken nedy's request. Hill had scraped the wallpaper off the walls of a historic home in Thurmont. Md. Glaser. a Richmond interior decorator pointed out that the! Corona and Redlands. He is presently a Commercial Salesman working out of the company's Colton Marketing Station. He has one son. Douglas, vvho is presently altenduig San Diego State College. They are both members of the Gun club of Redlands. Mr. Scott's father and mother live in Whittier. Mis father, James Scott, was a long-time employee of the Union Oil Company and is now retired. Mr. Scott is active in DeiMolay work as a member of the Advisory Board of the Deifolays in Redlands. He is also a member of the Masonic Lodge in Redlands, a! The following week's menus art io'?«-i typical of these requirements. 1 iR?il Mo"<J''y — "ot clog "ilh relish, creamed potatoes w i t li chees* sauce, harmony salad, fruit and, milk. Tuesday — Meat balls with ric« in tomato sauch, ^reen beans, celery sticks. French bread, berry cobbler and milk. Wednesday — Irish slew, col« slaw, whole wheal biscuit, Jello with fruit and milk. Thursday — Chili beans, tossed salad, cornbreari, fruit, cookie and milk. i'^-iday — Tuna and noodles, spinach with hard cooked egg, apple and celery salad, fruit muffin, milk and vanilla ice cream cup. HARRY S. SCOTT COMPACT PROCLAMATION James earns masters degree Henry A. James, instructor and head of the department of engineering, San Bernardino Valley college, has recently returned from Arizona State University at Tempe. where he earned a master's degree in the field of civil engineering during his year of sabbatical leave. As part of the work for his thesis. .Mr. .lames dcveloncd a materials-testing course lor college- level engineering students. In order to conduct these tests, be designed a steel frame for Ihe testing of concrete, which Ihe .ASU Engineering school is now using in its testing laboratory. -Mr. Janios received his Bachelor of Science degree from UCLA in 1951 and coiitiniiod al that campus for I wo years of graduate study in the field of education. He is now in his eighth year of teaching at Valley College. The James family, which includes his wife Ardith and three children, resides at 820 C a j o n street. Mr. James is the son oil member of the Masonic club of'c,„ i n • i j u- union Oil Company a^ hasj^™^ ^^l^^ 1^ R?dland Kivan clX ""'^^-"'^ P™" Kedlaiicls Kivvanis clue. claiming Oct. 27-Nov. 2 as "Auto Show Week." "We made the proclamation compact in keeping with the cars for '62.'" explained the mayor. LOS ANGELES (UPI) — MavorlMr. and .'\Irs. Warren B. James, of command in June on charges . of trying to influence his troops' 'J^ Spokane, voles in Ihe 1960 election. Gen. Bruce Clark. .Army coni-j mander for Euroiw. said in thei admonition that "Gen. Walker's! I past military and combat record; is commendable. ' ".No one can question Gen. Walker's sincerity of purpose. Clark said, "but his actions exceeded the limits of propriety for an officer of the Army." er in St. Paul, and of two vvomenithe Brentwood home of businfts-.vvas .st ' man Sam Horowitz. About People Mrs. Paul Wack, 740 Dana street, a patient in Redlands Community hospital for the past two and one-half weeks, is now allowed visitors. David D. Whitson, 20, son of: Ah-, and .Mr.s. Paul H. Whitson.* 307 Westvvood lane. Redlands. re-' KEEPSAKE DIAMONDS Xngagement and Weddinj Rings, Interlocklnf ATountincs. Harry G. Wilson 111 E. Stati Jeweler PY 3-4806 WILLIAM G. MOORE. Publisher. FRANK E. MOORE. Editor. VAN HEUSEN SHIRTS \e\v "Drip-Dry" Whites Vanuge S4.-^. Century Vantage J5. Fowler's Men's Weari 167 Orange St. PY 3-5623 Day Nursery receives $1, from Assistance League III A check for SI.000 from Redlands Assistance League was presented by Mrs. Richard B. Cook Jr., representing the League, to Mrs. Douglas Armstrong, president of Redlands Day Nursery board at the board's meeting this; week. Mrs. Cook emphasized the necessity of community-wide support to make the Community Thrift Shop of 73. Enrollment at the end of the month was 92 with 67 families represented. During this period, four children were cared for without chai'ge and 56 at a charge below the actual cost, Mrs. Dilthey announced. She reported that five members of the staff were taking University Extension courses in professional nursery practices. .„.., being produced from the same blocks. jcently was promoted to .specialist - . lour at Fori Campbell, Ky.. when'| ihe is a member of the ioisl Air-; jborne Division Band. Specialist! j Whitson entered the .Army in Junc^ jlPBO and comoleted basic training: jat Fort Ord, "Calif. He is a \m\ graduate of Pacific High school.! San Bernardino, and attended San Bernardino \'alley college. Russell M. Gassett, fireman, ,US\. son of .Mr. and Mrs. Charles! Mrs. Dilthey expressed appre -|M. Gassett of 34940 Avenue H,j Yucaipa. participated in Exercise "Warm-Up," a joint naval-marine Emmerson- St. Pierre FUNERAL CHAPELS 500 Marion road, and is the nephew of Miss Mary James, 183 Center Place. elation for the scrap lumber and hardware donated by the Johnson Lumber Company for children's activities. She also expressed the need for games for sLx and seven year olds. Mrs. D. J. Stewart presented a report on civil defense needs and preparations as related to the Two state supervisors visited the children of the Day Nursery. Publlslied every evening (except Sundayl at Facts buUding. 700 Brookside at Center, Redlands, California, ''ounded October 23, 1890, 71st year. Entered as seconr* class matter Oclnber 22. 1890. at the Po.st Office at iRedlands. California, under act of. . - r , i • r~ > r • • 'March :i. 1878 j00 Vine Street a successful veil-,nursery m September for inspcc- Board members present were SUBSCRIPTION RATES turc Iw oi'dcr lo provide funds for tion purposes. Mines. .-Xi-mstrong. Chris Barnes, Bv carr^croeuUrv til? chnritablc activities of the; Starling October Zi. there wilf Ray G. Caruthers. W'illiam B. Oil' Monih .' s (.-.".Assistance League. be 75 University of Redlands stu- Clark. Edward F. Dibble. Russell """ic'J?;^"' -—1 Z1'J'w tleorgc Dilthey. acting di- dents who will visit the nur.sery: Goodwin. William Klausner. Dan- OK* v ..r ..SI'''L....'''~'. Z„r.I iiii'iu rector, reported that the nursery^for observation and study over a iel Mahoney. Elmer Park, W. E. was open 20 days in September period of .several weeks, the board Silverwood, Stewart and Lynn . a . amphibious operation in the Oki nawa area, while serving aboard the dock landing ship USS Alamo. The Alamo, a unit of the Seventh Fleet, is one of the fleet's components participating in the exercise with units of the Third Ifarine Division. By Mali Onu Month % t,.so On« l*ir islou'with an average daily attendance was told. 'Walker. ,\uto - Home - .Occident - Life INSURANCE [iL^Lire uiih a-jsurance. Hn'e cnm- psnic; that handle ali \our in.sur- ance need=. AL. KEZENDES 403 E. Central Ave . Redlands PY 2-3442 i PY 3-4132 KURTZ, George Requiem Mass: 10:00 a.m. Today St. Frances X. Cabrini Church TfflLENfUS, Mrs. Lillian .3:00 p.m. Sunday Yucaipa Chapel Graveside Sei-vices: 2:00 p.m. Monday Forest Lawn : J10XL£Y, Mrs. Geneveive E. . Sen-ices Pending Yucaipa Chapel Phone PY 3-2441 BROOKSIDE AVE. AT CENTER I ACROSS FROM THE NEW DAILY FACTS BUILDING Announcemenf of Funeral Services OTHO S. OSBORN Services 10:30 a.m.. Monday, at the F. Arthur Cortner Chapel. mS. ISA WATERS MILLER Services 2:00 p.m.. Monday, from the F. Arthur Cortner ChapeL JIRS. CLARA C. AiMBROSE Graveside services 11:00 a.m., Tuesday, at Hillside Memorial Park. f. ARTHUR CORTNER 221 BROOKSIDE AVE. • PY 2-1411

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