The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 16, 1952 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, October 16, 1952
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Page 6
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I PAGE enc BLYTHKVTLLB (ARK.) COURIER Acheson Ready To Tell Foreign Affairs Stand Secretory of State Will Speak to U.N. Today or Tomorrow (Continued from Page !) to »»(• »ncl> i condemnation, but Gromyko, coming to the nld of C«eclK»lov»kla'» Jlrl Nosek, said ' U» ch»rg« still has "not lost Us ur- ffocy .": He ««Jd U. S. agents "have b«n caught red-handed Inside the Soviet Union," but he gave no further details. Ernest A. Gross, the American delegate, said his country would not oppose inclusion of the Hem since the Americans "never fenred exposing the falsa charges brought by the agents of the Soviet group." Other explosive issues the Steer- Ing Committee approved for debate were: 1. A motion ny iircsU—bitterly opposed by Russia—that tha Assembly eppeil to (ho four great powers to conclude an Austrian Independence treaty. The 15-member committee voted down the Russian objection 12 to 2, with Pearson not voting. , ; 3. Tunisian and Moroccan complaints against French colonial rule, introduced by the Asian-Arab bloc of nations in the U .N. France refused to recognize the Asscm Red Slogans Hail Anniversary TOKYO W) — Tiie Communist Pelplng radio has revealed ft set of slogans for celebrating the third anniversary of ncd rule over China. There were 61 slogans—most of them lengthy. An example: "Hail to street workers, transport workers, medical and health workers, radio and communications workers, rear •service and front line cultural workers who are assisting Chinese People's Volunteers!" Most ot the slogans ore the usual Conxmunist nittl-Amerlciin stuff, such us: "Strengthen work of resisting American aggression and aiding Korea and strive for successful conclusion of war against astjressfon in Korea and peaceful settlement of Korean question!" bjy's competence to discuss the two questions, claiming they were Internal problems, and declared she would boycott the discussion. 3. Two touchy questions affecting South Africa—India's long-standing charge that Indian minorities arc victims of discrimination In South Africa, and a complaint by the Asian-Arab group that South Africa Is threatening international peace through her "apartheid" policy of racial segregation. Q. P. Jooste of South Africa protested unsuccessfully against Inclusion of the two items on the agenda, declaring U. N. discussion would constitute Interference In his country's internal affairs. Fish that walk on dry land are found among catfish, labyrinth fishes, gobies, blennles and eels. EISENHOWER (Continued from Pan 1» mi arm around another figure^ and the two were watching the dynamiting of a TVA dam labeled "Public Power Development." The caption on the cartoon Bald: "It would be beautiful, general/' Opposite the cartoon was an editorial titled "Look Out In the Valley!" In part, the editorial said Elsenhower's position on river basin development "was no more than an Invitation to private power to 'come and got it/ " Eisenhower denounced the advertisement - as an example of "lies" that he said are being peddled against htm—and he repented that mere was no trulh In such charges. Ho said any insinuation that he was opposed to public power was n distortion and nil example of "misguided mind reading." Silliman Evans, publisher ot Ihc TennesKcnn, -a Democratic morn- Itig newspaper, said in Nashville today that Eisenhower's criticism of Iho editorial did not remove nn assumption lliut he would favor private power interests. Gun Show to Be Held At Sears Office Here A gun show, featuring GS different sporting guns which range tn price from $2.70 to S300 will be held at Sears, Roebuck's sales office, 217 West Main, tomorrow ami Saturday. A gun expert will accompany the show. FRIDAY and SATURDAY >AY, <XJT Melon Substitute . Dismays Raiders PAPII.LfON, Neb. (/I»)_A pair of elderly bachelor brotherg apparently put an end to raids which have teen pteylng havoc for several years with watermelon patches on their farm nenr here. This year otto and Elmer Zeeb replaced their melons with Colorado citron, a fruit that looks like melon when ripe. There's a difference though, as this fall's first— nna probably last—raiding party found out. The cllron fruit Is bitter and so tough It "bound's like a rubber ball." The raiders discarded theirs before they had gone far on their way back to town, Commodity And Stock Markets— N«w York Cotton Chicago Wheat Open High Low MB Deo .... M2K M2U M2« Ki'A Mch .... 238*4 23914 238% Chicago Corn Open High Low J:1S Dec . .. l<J5',i 165% 165 165% Mch . ,. 169ii 169% 16954 168H Soybeans Nov . Jan . Mch . May . Otmn .. 299 .. 238 .. 299 .. 293li Hlsjh Low 1:15 2W,i 291 295 293« 29TW 593!1 300 !i 298 ',4 299 Vi 300 29^'i 299 Dec Mch May July Open High Low 1:15 . 3686 3710 3077 3683 370C 3728 3605 3701 3702 3722 3692 3608 3610 3088 3660 3665 N.w York Stock* AT and T Amer Tobacco Anaconda Copper lieiii Steel Chrysler Coca-Cola , Gen Electric Gen Motors Montgomery Ward N Y Central Int Harvester J C Penney Republic Steel Radio Socony Vacuum .. ! studebaker , Standard of N J . | Texas Corp ...... I Sp.irs U S Steel ... Sou PEIC Ntw Orleans Cotton Open High LOT- i : j s n « 3685 370-1 3073 3680 Mch 3700 3719 3690 3096 Mny 3703 3720 .3(580 3097 J«ly 3G71 3617 3655 3660 162 1-2 56 38 1-8 41 5-8 80 1-4 101 61 5-8 58 3-1 56 5-3 17 1-2 30 1-8 66 1-2 37 7-8 26 5-8 32 3-4 35 3-4 12 1-8 51 5-8 56 7-8 31 7-8 39 1-8 Livtstock NATIONAL STOCKYARDS, 111. l/P^(L'SDA)-Kogs 9.500; embargo on outgoing shipments forcing all hogs through local slaughter channels; moderately active; barrows utf fflta tt> MX up no**? M lew thus' W«dDMd»y'2 avw*f«; McfaUr weight* 1.00 to' l.» low*; vm 71 to l.af IOWMT; mo* low OB weights over 400 Itit; cholc* 180260 Ibs harrows uul gilt* uniort«d for grado 19,00-1».10, mostly 19.00; «***• muni MUM *M M.K-U.M, few l«.a»; !•». • 1I.M.U.H; *owk 400 lb* down l«.n-lT.7f, l«w 18.00; bwv- f»r Mm 14. n - !*.»; bo»n l.to low«r at 10.SO-14.00. Cattle 3,000, calves 1,700; etrly trading- eonMn*d xuial? to HgM w«l«h4 butdvK «tMr> and h«tf»»»| tt»«« about •tcady with Commer. cltl to cholc* oHerlagt J».00-».OC; cows slow; »ome Initial »tles about steady but undertone weak; utility and commercial cows 13.SO-i7.00. Genuine Sour Mash is the •name of a costly old style method of making the best Kentucky bourbon. OLDFITZGERALD has long been recognized as the Kentuckian's favorite Bond. OLD NOW AGED 5 FULL YEARS $/r15 Fifths 5 .33 Pints S-ju Half PK **"«l*» W Plus Tan t Plus Tai L plus Tax 80 SQ. FANCY V J\<. I *M1»- I . ^g^^ PRINTS 3 yds. Fast colors in a host •of wonderful patterns MEN'S big Indian FLANNEL SHIRT Heavy weight, sanforized! Neck sizes 14 to 17. A regular 2.98 LADIES' 100% NYLON SWEATE Sizes 34 to 40 Reg. 1.98 LADIES' RAYON SATIN SLIPS Lace trimmed — top ond bottom. A regular 2.98 value at Wade's! We Reserve the Right TO LIMIT QUANTITIES WADE'S 5 & 10' STORE 100 W. Main In BlytheviiU 100% BONDED KENTUCKY STRAIGHT SmZE.L-WELLE. D.STUIERY . ESTA B L,SH ED '°O U°S V^( o, MOON_D lS T R r BtJ T,NG CO. Littl, Rock, Arkansas YES D IT'S ALL You WIN, and il's no (rouble at all! Housewives, nere's your big opportunity to win a 24 PIECE SET OF GLASS- V/ARE or on 18 PIECE SET of PYREX! No trouble at a// ... here's all you have to do. Know a friend who would like to have a wonderful, new FRIG I DAI RE Refrigerator or any other major FRIGIDAIRE appliance? You do! Then simply dial 6096 and give us tier name. If we sell t hit friend of yours, you'll get absolutely FREE a lovely set of dishes or pyrex. See how easy it is ... and we know your friend will be happy, too! Incidentally, it you haven't been out to HALSELL & WHITE'S recently, we invite you to come out real soon. Watch tor our grand opening! HALSEIL & WHITE Furniture & Appliance Co. MAIN AND DIVISION PHONE 6096

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