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The Leader-Post from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada • 1

Publication:
The Leader-Posti
Location:
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Issue Date:
Page:
1
Extracted Article Text (OCR)

0 THE LEADER-POST WEATHER FORECAST Moderately Warm VOL. XXXHI. NO. 186 TWENTY PAGES REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1941 INGLB con 5c WbMbm SmoSesdsk urn I (Associated Press) MOSCOW, Aug. 7.

The Russians indicated Thursday a new German-Finnish push toward Leningrad from the north had' fizzled out, but reported heavy fighting south of that in the Smolensk sector west of Moscow and on the Ukraine front. Failure of the afternoon communique to mention a battle which had been reported raging all day Wednesday on the Karelian Isthmus, northwest of Leningrad, was taken hero to mean that pressure on the Russian lines in that area had been relieved at least temporarily. 1 The bulletin declared the Red army was engaged in fierce combat all Wednesday night on the Estonian front, where the Germans have been trying to push northward toward Leningrad along the west shore of Lake Peipus. References to continued fighting in the Smolensk area and in the vicinity of Bel Tserkov, south of (Canadian Press) LONDON, Aug. 7.

The Royal Air force reported Thursday successful raids on industrial centres of western Germany and shipping off the Netherlands coast. From the wide-ranging op home. Another large explosion RED TANK IS TOPS: (A German tank is crushed under a Soviet tank commanded by a Captain Kukushkin, according to Russian censor-passed caption accompanying this radiophoto, flashed from Moscow to New York as reports from the front indicated that Russian mechanized forces were still successfully holding off the Nazis famed panzer divisions. appeared to be from a burning ammunition dump. the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, gave no hint of any change in the situation in those vital sectors.

(Reuters news agency reported from Moscow that the' Soviet high command is confident that the Germans will reach neither Kiev nor Leningrad, let alone Moscow itself, said a London broadcast heard by Columbia Broacasting System The battle of the Karelian isth mus, first reported in the early morning communique, told of fighting in the vicinity of Kaki-salmi, 75 miles from Leningrad. The communique indicated the German and Finnish forces on the Karelian isthmus were attempting to advance along the south shore of Lake Ladoga against stiff Russian resistance. i Nazis Over Moscow BRUNO MUSSOLINI Younger Mussolini Killed (Bv Associated Press) ROkE, Aug. 7. Capt Bruno Mussolini, 23, who abided by his fathers admonition to "live dangerously, was killed Thursday in the crash of a long range bomber -he was testing as commander of a The Nkzi air force struck at detachment that was to use the Thailand Expected to Resist if Attempted by Japanese ward Alexandria and Cairo has sistance of Yugoslavia and Greecei The remaining Italian troops in Moscow, the Germans are turning been virtually ruled out.

which cost the Germans time and, East Africa, specifically Ethiopia, southeast from Bel Tserkov, in Tobruk, Libyan strongpoint still heavy casualties, and Crete are ready for the taking. There the Ukraine, in a push toward the Moscow Wednesday night f6r the are pockets of resistance at Gon-1 Caucasus. There has been no '1" night since the war dar (3,000 Europeans and 6,000 great change tn the situation in started, but the Russians said the natives) and at Uolchefit (3,000 the last 24 hours. It is inereas- raids a those which preceded it Europeans and 1,000 natives) but'ingly clear that on all other fronts these are expected to be speedily I the third great German offensive vasion of the French mandate up, solidifying the East has been held -J Syria was the final blow to the African section of the Middle East the Ukraine is whole German Middle Eastern! lines. plan.

which used up such German forces as air troops which would have been vital for attacks on Syria and Iraq. The British and Free French in- Halted at Smolensk, facing very slow. (Continued on Page Two) in British hands, lies as a constant threat to the flank of any major Axis offensive into Egypt. The triumph in Iraq was one of the first brakes put on the vast pincer movement with which the Germans planned to take Suez and the Caucasian oil fields of Russia. Other brakes were the fierce re- British Move Into Caucasus May Be Next Strategic Move plane.

He died at 10 am, near Pisa. Bruno was born April 22, 1918, at Milan while his father, as head of the young Fascist movement, was editing the newspaper II Popolo D'ltalia. Bruno was the premiers second son. The fascist leader flew at one to Pisa with his chief of air force, Gen, Francisco Pricolo. Two other fliers the second pilot and a mechanic were killed in the crash while the remaining members of the eight-man crew were injured.

This morning Capt Bruno Mussolini died gloriously near Pisa following an accident In the flight of an experimental plane, said the official announcement. One Daughter was married in 1988 to Rubertl. They had one child, now 17 months old. The leaves Premier Mussolini four children. Countess Edda 30.

wife of Foreign Minister Galeazzo Ciano; Anna 11, Vittorio, 24, and Romano, 13. The Italian radio announcer said Biuno always had lived dangerously and called him one of the most representative members of plane was lost, Only a few bombers reached the city, an announcement said. Contradicting Nazi claims that most of the Soviet air force has been knocked out, the Russians said their planes delivered heavy blows at Nazi ground forces. Fourteen Nazi planes were destroyed during the day against Soviet losses of seven planes. Moderate Losses Claimed BERLIN.

The German high command claimed German losses were model ate compared, with the extraordinarily high" losses of the Red aimy in the battle of Geimans when the latter eratlons Wednesday and last night 10 planes were lost. It was indicated the assault was renewed on northern France Thursday As on Tuesday night, Wednesday night's attacks were centred on Frankfurt, Mannheim and Karlsruhe iiv a continuation of the methodical pounding of German targets, and a communique reported huge fires were started and a considerable weight of bombs were dropped on each city." These raids cost eight planes. Convoy Attacked The air ministry said that Blenheim bombers searching for enemy shipping in daylight" attacked a destroyer-protected convoy off the Netherlands coast and "after the attack one ship was seen to be down by the stern with smoke pouring from it" During the night an airdrome In German-held Norway was attacked and an enemy vessel" torpedoed off the Norwegian coast by a British plane. Six German planes were destroyed in the last 24 hours, five fighters by R.A.F. fighters in a series of sweeps Wednesday and a sixth fighter by a British bomber which it attacked over Germany Wednesday night.

In other attacks Wednesday, hangars of an enemy airdrome northera France were set afiie and bombs dropped on runways Docks at Calais were blasted. Sweep Over Channel British day raiders, carrypg out the round-the-clock schedule of air assaults, made a big sweep over the channel and northern France. Several waves of planes crossed toward Calais, Dunkirk and Ostend. Another pair of Nazi planes was destroyed in light German attacks over east and southeast England during the night, the ministries of air and home security reported. A few persons were injured ana flight damage was done at a few points.

A lone Nazi plane attacked some northeast coast towns after daylight Thursday, spraying machine-gun bullets from a low altitude. It was chased by British fighters. It was the second successive night of British attacks on targets in the cities of Frankfurt, Mannheim and Karlsruhe. In the raid Tuesday night the British bombers were whirled along by a gale that made them hit nnifRC as fast as fighters. fwli HUMUS In Tuesdays daylight sorties an airdrome near Cherbourg, two tankers off the French coast, a motor torpedo boat and a coastal radio station were among the targets.

Approximately a dozen Invasion (Canadian Press) LONDON, Aug. 7. is expected to attempt by Japan to her and British aid, or material, will by the United response to the was declared here in the course of an review. The source for this pictured Britain stronger and ready action In the where, the informant Britain already halted a Nazi drive the Sues canal. This reference to the Egypt's western frontier, of Suez, and the Britain has won in Iraq, oiP- the other Suez.

Now, he said, the position fiom the Turkey to the border so strong that the Axis nervously of British on Libva, Sicily or islands. Nazis Gravely This source acknowledged the Germans still held in the Russian he said, the command is gravely over "the slowness of and the very heavy The world-wide as described in follows: Middle East British blows against at Salum, on the frontier, although indecisive, have a tcfll of German vehicles that the a large scale German SUBMARINE (Associated CAIRO, Aug. 7. A raid on the submarine Augusta, on the Italian Sicily, by British naval Thailand resist any invade military be conditioned States situation, it Thursday authoritative statement as much for offensive Middle East declared, has toward was a defence of west dominance Syria and flank of British military border of of Libya is is talking assaults the Greece i Concerned that the initiative campaign although, German high concerned the advance casualties. military situation, this review, the Germans Egyptian-Libyan apparently taken such armored fighting possibility of attack to ces said, equipped with planes, tanks, guns and munitions which have pouied in From Britain and the United States in recent months.

Some strategists suggested holding force might be left on the Turkey, Iraq or even Iran, they the said. British forces now in Syria also might help to pioteet Tuikey. Some observers thought a drive into Ctrenaiea for a real cleanup of the Axis foices in Afnca was likely. The best season for operations hot oil here moved across Citenaica in sweltering April weather thought too for attack. Defence of Russia's Caucasus wells was considered vitaLSmolensk.

The wells pioduce it reiterated its claim that the 000 tons annually. fierce struggle 200 miles west ofiCount Newspapers welcomed Mr. Ed-1 Moscow has ended victoriously1 Bruno Gina Marinia, death with Ciano, Maria, (Canadian Press) LONDON, Aug. 7. Commentators speculating on the direction of the "next forward plunge in the Middle East pledged by Foi-eign Secretary Eden in the house of commons, suggested Thursday two altei natives another attack on Italian North Africa or a move into the Russian oil field area to aid Russia.

A seasoned army of 500,000 men now is ready, these sour Egyptian frontier while troops! in the Libyan desert is snot due based Syria could move to op-1 for six weeks, when cooler wea- pose any Nazi thrust at the Rus-ther begins, but Allied troopsWs warning that British forces sian oil fields. These troops were believed to have remem-' might move thiough ft icndly 1 bered the lesson taught them by Control of Oceans Believed To Be Plan of Axis Nations for Hitlers armies. On the Smolensk front alone, the communique claimed, 310 000 Russians fell prisoner and 3.205 tanks and 3,120 artillery pieces were captured It said the Russians lost Fascist youth." 1.098 planes in the battle and an He showed a high sense of sar-unsurveyable amount of othcr(rifice as a volunteer -fighter in war materials Spains anti-bolshevik- war," the announcer added. Bruno also piloted planes for Italy in the Ethiopian war in 1935-36. Little had been known of his activities in the present war until the disclosure that he had died as a test pilot.

It then gave in detail the progress of German forces from the time spearheads shot out from the twin battlefields of Bialystok and Minsk to what the high command claims now to be total success In the battle of Smolensk. DNB, Nazi propaganda and news agency, reported what it called the val and military bases obtained Indo-China and the resultant threat to British Malaya, Singapore and the Philippines. tack from the Pacific and the Atlantic. To win that stranglehold on the world, it was pointed out, the Germans and Japanese must first seize the British and Frencn strong points that dominate the worlds seaways, and officials said By LLOYD LEHRBAS Associated Press Staff Writer WASHINGTON, Aug. 7.

The United States government, it was learned Thursday, believes Japans pressure bid for control of Thailand is part of a well-patterned Axis plan to seize control of the and also for bases along the Mediterranean to give the Nazis control of that strategic sea and to facilitate the capture of the Suez canal. 2. Expected Nazi demands on Spain to permit the passage of troops for an attack on Gibraltai that would permit the Italian Indias Great Poet Dies 4. Japans demands on Thailand futile attempt of Russian which, if won, would put the Japa- forces to break out of encirclement nese in strategic position not only east of Smolensk, for attacks on Singapore and the A Red army unit, betrayed by rich East Indies, but also for an the glint of its bayonets a grain- DOCK oceans and thereby dominate the he Seressive P'n now in mo- navy, now imprisoned the Med-overland thrust through Burma field, it claimed, was annihilated (By Canadian Pres) iterranean, to move into the At-'and India to meet Axis forces, by a German attack. Two cavalry lan tic.

3 Japans expansion of the na- (Continued on Page Five) troyed, the agency said. world. The latest Japanese moves were described as dovetailing perfectly ith German demands on Vichy for military and naval bases in French colonial possessions, particularly at Dakar. tion have that objective. Since Japan represents one of the jaws the gigantic pincers movement, an authoritative source stated, Japanese encroachment tn Indo-Chma and Thailand cannot be considered in the category oi I isolated aggression, but must be treated as a vital element the Press) successful base at island of planes Tuesday night was announied Nazi planes on the ground of an Thursday by the Royal Air Production of Light Tanks Shows Startling Increase All evidence available, an in- Nazis strategy foimed soui ee stated, points to a For this teason, it was explain- airdrome were attacked with Mltfdle East command chine-gun and cannon tire and a Nazi fighter that rose to the challenge was shot down.

Two escorting Nazi fighters were downed later when the A F. attacked Nazi tankers, leaving smoke rising from one of the ships. Fires Rage Heavy bombs, dropped low altitude, scored many hits and one touched off a oil fire on a submarine JetROMF rnm ROME. The Italian high mand claimed Italian planes hit two from drive by Germany tojed, the United States has assumed veryjcontroj all strategic bases in the a fotceful diplomatic policy de-large )AtanllCi whlle japan seized simi- signed both to stiffen Vichy reslst- dar objectives in the Pacific. ance to German demands and to com- CouW Dominate SrM jwa.n Japan against further mdi- (Bv Associated Press) WASHINGTON.

Aug 7 Pro- Whcn-and if-Germany and tar venture, in the South Pa- of tanks increased Japan accomplish that ambitious before', is too late li.260 pprppnt during the second quarter of 1941 over totals fnt the I The actual number of the 18-ton war machines produced was not disclosed but it was learned more than 225 a month are being deliveied The office of production management does not make public fig- torpedo-launching British In Tuesday night raids on the in an attack on a Brit-, German cities, fires were left rag-jlsh naval formation in the Med- a ranking official said, Clues Listed ing and the attack on Mannheim terranean and that two British the Axis powers could join forces! As outlined by informed soimes Stales defeme statisticians was particularly severe Here. merchant ships totalling 11,000 across the southern oceans ana the present dues to the Axis grand puted Thursday first three months of 1941 United com-! Indias greatest modern poet and winner of the Nobel prize for lit-eratuie in 1913, died Thursday after a protracted illness. Tagore underwent an operation recently for a kidney ailment Practically unknown to readers of the western world before he was accorded the Nobel prize, Ta-goie's writings were translated i i into manv languages in recent uies on the output of guns, tanks and powder but it was learned els that it has just compiled these percentages on the increases dur- anfl. so! lal eU mg April, May and June over T1' had tra' January, Eobruaiv and March throughout Eurojie and the Amer-Machme guns 69 pereent ltai kcturing and reciting Medium (27-ton) tanks, 237 191-i be was knighted in repercent cognition of his work Despite Smokeless powder, 126 percent bis interest in social reforms, Ta-T 46 percent. Sre managed to keep clear of Bombers, 45 percent.

Indian politics after a few tenta- Training planes, 40 percent live excursions into that field Airplane deliveries during the He tried unsuccessfully on many first six months of the year occasions, however, to bring about amounted to 7,423 cart Hindu-Mosiem unity. 25,680 Left Behind In Greece and Crete one explosion was so effective vvere sunk by an Italian sub- dominate the seas, isolating the strategy are. Americas for a co-ordinated at- 1 German demands on Vichy i Tirl I If it VIC for the base at Dakar for 1 operations in the South Atlantic. (' fES REPORTED Shij) Workers Strike in U.S. lighted up clouds at 8.000 feet At marine in the Atlantic Ludwigshafen, across the river, bombs smashed a large chemical factory and another great explosion occurred.

Flames leaped hundreds of feet into the air. At Karlsruhe a large factory was destroyed and fires roared in railway yards and industrial areas as the bombers headed for Belgian On Verge Survivors of Mu tin) U.S. Tankers For Russia (Bv Associated Press) WASHINGTON, Aug 7- Prr'L, ASmNGTOY Aug 7 (Leader-Post Yorkton Bureau) YORKTON, Sack Aug 7 There are two patients in York'on ssoowtpd hospital suffering from infantile NEW YORK, Aug 7 Big shqr-paraljsis One is fiom Shcho. one yards, working on defence con (Canadian Press) Gabriel, a fireman aboard the' romJedburg and on June 10 hos- tracts, at Kearney, NJ, and Survivors of the Belgian freigh-1 torpedoed ship, thinks the boat pital authorities admitted a Bangor Brooklyn. were hit by walk- ter Mercier, torpedoed in mid-as jinxed from the moment it -Har-reSlfient ho has smre been dis- outs Thursday involving Atlantic, told newsmen in Canada' left for England They made the ad' charged Thus far Yorkton IO and AF L.

workers they had planned to mutiny and easing safely, but had the mis- eritheoutbreak seize control of the shrn that res-1 fortune to dock at a port that was tour united Mates tanker ships seize control oi uie snip uiai res- are being turned over to Russia to (Bv Canadian Press) Full details are not yet avaJ- LONDON. Aug 7 War Ser-e- able but present informatics tuiy David Margesson toid the house of commons Thursday, in a wntten reply to a question that Br.t sh and impena' forces ic It 25 68(1 pi Br evatuat.ons it Vi- c- Austlal all an i said to show that the following was the total strength in Greece the start of the German attack Orig nal Strength Evacuated -h 24 H0 16 442 la an 17 125 14.157 ca.i'd 16 532 14.266 The Figures for Crete Greece and Crete Th.s included beh.nd a total of and dead in the Meeting Mystery (By Associated Press) WASHINGTON, Aug 7. Amid widespread but entirely unsub-atantrated rumors of a meeting between President -Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill came a message from the presidential vacation yacht Wednesday which might or might not dispel them depending upon what was read between the lines. The wireless message, sent by, her way and dropped the skipper of the yacht Potomac Norfolk, irgmia read: Only three Canadians were the in a gesture c.f a be v(r, far ahead He said lhat piv lne 1 nr Cruise ship proceeding slrwlv among the survivors, Stanley Ga- thumbs-up" farexell, tooed the a- .1 ne consumption on the At- Srme of Ham. i nc post of teamsters threw up p'Ou 1 nr- along coast with party fishing briel of Glare Bay, NS: Leo whi-d'e four me- lard seaboard had increased ma- sextant to t-e iue general r.f An Al I.

smkesrrian sail th Weather fair, sea smooth Potomac Steele of Halifax and an un-j Seven days laer they were tei a the last two we-eks dc- aircraft p-ciur Balpn Bell tompanv had icfuxed a un'on de river sailors responding tn New identified third no in England p.ekcd up after ex.t'mg on one sp te ie riespread effort to jn- Smve ha- horn e'Uchrd tn me mand for a cordr prov id ng a England air after Washington Belgian end English sapors com- hard b.stu.t and 10 teaspoons of flueme motorists voluntarily to New Aoik and asf ngton 1 son flat pay mcrea-e uom cents summer," iprised the rest of the crew. (water a day. icuria.l consumpt.on. offices of me department an houi capacity for producing th.s h.gh mumque sa. it gh bers of the 1 6 ocane fuel increased immedi- and ar cere us.M Qf Manne and Ca'r? 11 Tri declared a holiday in a wage The tiansfers to Puvs.a m.ght bombs Chris Mathcscr business agent sad 6 00i mem APPOINT! bers were involved OTTAWA 7 -Announce-1 Shortlv thereafer it developed went down with the ship Gabr.el um ui, pun to conserve gaso- 1 r'da' hy that the A teamsters a so were recounted and as she was sinking ne me east coast mav not Partmfr-t rf mi.n nr.s and sup-, in a separo'e dispute w.lh Beth- were the capta.n in a gesture of a be v(rv far ahead He sa.d that 1 nr 1 lehem a the same plant hen the Opginal Strength Evacuatei 14 000 7 130 6 450 2,890 a 7 IOC 4 56(1 totals at the start of tack 57,757 off ers a men, ftp -gM ng "xluded men evtcu-44 865 were ev a.

cited hen the ated fresm Gieece but not re-Germans altarked Crete the i- evacuacd Egypt before the tish strengh was 27 530, ana of Crete opera! on It is not po these 14 580 were taken safely bie to eav how many ol the misa-awav. ng a1-? pr. soners of war. New Zealand forces as wed those from the United Kingdom The war secretary said the lat- Bs est minimal on showed that of the Au-t a. a tctal Bi.t.sh strength in Greece e.

7ca.aiu at the bee m.ing of the Oc-man at- -h The Crete.

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