The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 14, 1952 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, October 14, 1952
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Page 3
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER w, iwt * Spttzberg May Assist in State Highway Probe Downie Appoints •. Little Rock Lawyer To Help with Case LITTLE ROCK (ff) _ Henry E. Spftzbcrg, « Little Rock attorney, may assist in the Pulaskl County Grand Jury Investigation ot state Highway Department operations.! The Jury yesterday aufhorlzcd Prosecutor Tom Downie to hire special counsel to assist in the probe Downie offered the Job to Spitzberg. who saM he would accept "provided the employment f°M not 'oo greatly interfere with ""Interest of my clients." The Jury is Investigating , « Highway Audit Commission report Hat It found "waste, dishonesty, extravagance" In the Highway Department. , Downie said he recommended additional counsel be hired because the investigation has assumed proportions which tax the facilities of my office." The Jury adjourned subject to call yesterday after hearing testimony from campaign finance managers of three 1950 and 1952 gubernatorial candidates. It has siib- necnaed campaign records, to' determine if the "high cost of running for governor" might have bearing on conditions reported by the HAC. Newsom to Speak At Grange Meet FA.YETTEVTLLE '.'Pi—The master of the National Orange, ilerschel D. Newsom, will be the principal speaker st the 3-day 13th annual meeting of the Arkansas state Grange which-begins here Thursday. Newsom will speak at the University of Arkansas Field House Friday night. Arkansas ffentr Briefs— Real Estate^Meii Told Public Housing Law Is Too Costly' By The AnocUtod Prew LITTLE ROCK — A tftl e«Ut« executive s»ys the United SUtes public housing program not only Uf too co«tly, it is » failure Mint h»« missed the low Income groups for which it was intended. • Morris w. Turner of Tulsa, N«tion»l Association of Real Estate Bo»rds director, told the 28th annukl convention of the Arlunsu Real Estate Association here yesterday that many public housing projects have b«en filled with the "favored law." He charged this action.to Inefficient administration and dishonesty in local governments. Henderson's Registrar Emeritus Dies ARKADELPHIA — The 68-year-old registrar emeritus of Henderson State Teachers College, R. T. Proctor, died here last night after a long Illness. ' • v • . Proctor, who retired in 1849, Joined the Henderson faculty In 1907. He was born in Huntsvllle, Ala. . '. ' expanding ot So/f Conservation Urged • LITTLB; ROCK — Arkansas conservationists were urged yesterday to expand the state's program of sol! conservation. And (he president of the National Association of Soil Conservation Districts, Waters s. Davis of League City, Tex., said Arkansas was •ahead of every state I've : been, to this year" in conservation. Davis spoke at a meeting of 100 supervisors of Arkansas* 67 soil conservation districts. The-meeting ends today. Cherry to Meet with Legislators LITTLE ROCK - Democratic Gubernatorial Nominee Francis Cherry said here yesterday that he had arranged a series of confer- thb w«k h IeBiSla '° r ' 1 educators and Prospective state 'employes for The Jonesboro".Jurist said he would talk with "just anybody who can get In." ' . . Always A Favorite 8894 14+4 By Sue Burnett The most satisfying style to weai this season and the next. An expertly tailored shirtwaist dresb that's new and "smart with front buttoning,- comfortable yoke and neat pockets^ . Pattern No. 8894 Is a sew-rite perforated, pattern in sizes H, 16. 18 20; 40, 42, 44. Size 16, 4 yards of 39- inch. For "this pattern, send 30c In COINS, your name, address, size desired, and the PATTERN NUM- BfcR to Siie Burnett-. Courier News, 375 Qulncy St., Chlcaso s, III. Ready for you now—Basic FASHION for '52, Fall and Winter. This new Issue is filled with ideas for smart., practical, sewing for a new season; gilt pattern printed Inside the book, 2*c. ZSA ZS* RETURNS—Zs« Zsa Gabor strikes "shipboard" pose after Arrival »t International Airport In New York by plane from London. The actress Is en route to Hollywood after completing a motion plcturt in England. (AP Winpholo) ILTTBEVILLB (AftK.) COURIER HEWII Marines Say Air Force's Attacks On Enemy Supply Lines 'Fizz'ed' \V A _C!l-TTrM/'l'TV\M i -v. rm_ - _ - . — WASHINGTON M>;-The Marine Corps commandant • says the air force's program to disrupt enemy supply lines in Korea is a "fizzle.'' He said Communists have brought up more guns than ever before. Violence, Flares At Strike-Bound Mississippi Plant WATER VALLEY, Miss. (/p)_The strike-bound Rice-Stix garment plant erupted in violence-for the second time In the week-old labor dispute. Naticiiiil guardsmen, assigned :he, plant Sunday, arrested two union women during a skirmish outside union headquarters yesterday. Gen. W. P. -Wilson,- In charge of the National Guard, said the two members of the striking Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (CIO1 were charged with-molesting and released on S500 bond. He IcientifledVthetn as Miss Arneal Lakey and Miss Evelyn Smith. But, Gen. Lemuel c Shepherd said yesterday, he thinks the continuing air force and navy bombings of big power plants' and kev industrial centers In North Korea must have hurt the enemy, Judging from the "awful screech and cry that has come from Moscow and Feiplng." The Leatherneck chief was sharply critical of the air force Interdiction program launched shortly after the Korean tn,ce talks got underway and designed to operate around-the-clock in efforts lo knock' out enemy road and rail supply lines. Not (only has the program failed in Korea, Gen. Shepherd told a news conference, but he said he questioned whether deep Interdiction — efforts to knock out such supply lines,far from the front — ever could: succeed completely. If it haj hot succeeded in Korea, he asked,, how could it be effective In Europe where communication lines are highly developed? There waa no Immediate comment from the other services, or I from the joint chiefs of staff. The Hell Bomb PAG3E NTNB So eminent a "^ nucteot physicist as Dr. Harold G. Urey believes HM| os a means of poisoning the atmosphere with radioactive atoms the H-bomb is virtually unlimited. Mop at left shows how radioactive clouds produced by specially could be carried across iKe U. S. By JAY HEAVILIN and RALPH LANE m H.i. iS& HCWsrCAti 4fo- * Limit o( i*vcrc <« fotaf .1- rffilrucfta* fcr DfoNuc ba«t -?? Ifmit of jtvere fo tot*t 4+ & Umil of K>»( 1^' SP*« -. QUEENS 5JOCKVILI ^•- -CENTDEi m ^ L Ufe llSTATEN/ How powerful on H-bomb can be mode? 3 , In terms of blost ond fire, the bomb's 3 I limits would be determined only by rhea : c ™!T,,l£ ( hcay l' ''X'i'oacn used. A bomb g with 10W limes the power of an A-bomb 3 «^= is envisioned. Such a bomb if dropped on 3 -- -- New Yo/lc City would w«ak the damage I pictured above. It would be ten times 5 ^...••»•• destructive than an A-bomb, i U. Spa Theatre Owner Killed In Auto Crash HOT SPRINGS M>)_Tile 42-year-, old manager of a string of the'aters here wns falally Injured early lo- day when his car crashed Into a bridge on Highway 8S about a mile east of Hot Springs. The victim, W. Clyde Smith, was commander of the Warren Townsend American Legion Post and lias been manager of the Malco Theaters here for the past 15 years. State Trooper Jack McKinley said Smith was driving toward Hot Springs when he_failed to make a curve and crashed into a bridge abutment and plunged into a creek. Boy, 5, Rescues Father from Sand Slide with Shovel FORT ANN. N. Y. (IP)— Five-year- old Donald Green, armed with his ov.-n small shovel, rescued his father after a sand slide that took the life of his grandfather yesterday.' Willis Green, 78,, and his son, Arthur, SO, were trapped while digging sand, on the elder Green's farm near this Lake George community. The walls of the pit gave way, burying (he older man In 35 feet ot sand and covering Arthur to his armpits. Donald ran from a nearby play area with his shovel and dug his father's;arms free. They both then worked frantically at the sand cov- Publisher Runs For Congress LITTLE ROCK l/p, -Publisher Ed Sihultz of Jacksonville qualified yesterday as an independent candidate for Congress from the state's 8=hultz, publisher of the weekly News Progress in Jacksonville, will oppose Rep. Brooks Hays, Little Rock - Democrat, and Hepublican Lonzo Ross-oi Cornvay in the general election Nov. 4. ' For that original Bourbon taste... enjoy the one and only JAMES E.PEPPER the original -',- , Kentucky Bourbon / A X A k x 200-Plus Horsepower Cars To Be Introduced Next Year DETROIT (ff) -_ The 200-plus horsepower automobile-will be introduced In the 1953 models. This was confirmed yesterday by executives of the Ford Motor Cn when they disclosed that Uia hew Lincoln curs will have . 205 horsepower, engines. Industry reports have it that perhaps two more car manufacturers also plan to step ovei 1 the 200-horsepowcr level. One manufacturer Is understood to be planning to boost power output to 210. Another has made tests showing that even better than that Power output can be attained with certain modifications. In the case of the Ford Lincoln model the increase is 45 horsepower over the 1952 model. The others rumored as considering an Increase already are fairly close to the '>00 horsepower point. •:Asked what advantage "there might be in 209-pJus power output In a stock automobile, a Ford engineer remarked: ".Well, this is a competitive indus- Born with the Republic... First Bourbon in Kentucky {1780)... More years than any Kentucky Bourbon... More friends every year. Straight 'Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey, 86 Proof. »a JAMES !: nmt i co. INC. UXINGTON, KINIUCM Judge Dismisses Political Suit MORRILTON (fl>>— Circuit Judge Audrey Strait yesterday dismissed a suit brought by ,steve Combs of Springfield which challenged the renomtnation of Consvay County Rep. Ira Long of Morrilton in the Aug. 12 Democratic primary. Combs' attorneys' recommended dismissal of the case. Combs, Long's opponent nl the race, had charged fraudulent voting. ering Willis Green, but could not find him. Other men finally reach ed the body. try; we've had to (to It. However once you've driven a car with the top power output, you won't be satisfied with anything less." In the preliminary road and track tests the new Lincoln cars have'av- eraged almost 115 miles an hour over a 100-mile rim. In some siralghlaway tests they have been driven better than 117 miles nn hour. ' EXCITING NEW SClEh£lE|C DISCOVERY PERFORMS CARPET CLEANING MAGICS! TJ <h» Jiomt beouly uealoiefM foi yam lugi .. Quick-SoU-Eo.yl Ccmpltlsl, Oitfetent' Nol 0 liquid, loop foam o, powdei Packed ready 10 Ulf Sp'inll* on, &,gih in, Votuym off. DIRTS GONE. CABPEIS 0«V r«od| 10 wolk on In 15 nrtoulei, Removei food Sloini. Greaie. Gym, tipli:<k. tot ... lv>n St 0 « Po|i,h. Ont Gallon Hall Gallon SJ 29. .Gdlon 137V. '" 8> Chits. S. Lemons, Furniture titratfion Guaranteed i TimeOut ForRefresfime . ME/tNS GOOD BEER! OIIUIDIICK »*os. »»wi«r eo., ST. LOUIS *> MO. l Know Why OFTHEYEAR!" Hie m~ita4A. "RtnbflrKJI nf AitMMMte D«- ilgn", Plain Farina styled tht »(•» Nash Goidrn Abfyies. D ISCOVER the new Golden Airityte—drive it.Know why it is "the car of the year". For no olhcr is so slartlingly new, so far advanced in comfort features. Sec (he widest scats, greatest eye-level visibility. Try the amazing new Airflytc ride that inspired the auto editor of a great national magazine to write, "The finest shockproof ride in the world today". Let us show you scores of luxury features only Nash can cITcr, from Airliner Reclining Seals to Weather Eye Conditioned Air. "Road-test" this new Golden Airflytc personally. Then let us show you how easily you can make it yours. Proved America's Greatest Engine for the second straight year in the 24-hour Lc Mara "Grantt Prix d'Endurance." TiatJL GOLDEN AIR FLYTES THE AMBASSADOR THE STATESMAN THE RAMtlEK THE FINEST OF OUR FIFTY YEARS SHELTON MOTOR COMPANY, 117 East Main, Blytheville

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