The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on August 28, 1950 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, August 28, 1950
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Page 7
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MONDAY, AUGUST 28, 1930 U.S. to Tighten Controls On Trade with Russians BLYTHEVTLLE, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS By JOHN' M. HIGHTOWER WASHINGTON, Aug. 28. Wj—Tile United Stales has decided to try to tighten up the system of trade controls by which strategic materials are supposed to be kepi from Russia. State and Commerce Department officials concede in talks uilh newwn that important war po- lenlSi goo<*s h.,ve been leaking out to the Communist countries through loopholes. But closing those loopholes Involves a difficult problem of cooperation by olhcr governments since most of them are In Western Europe. Some American experts on economic policy say that what the United States is faced with here is economic warfare with the Communist countries. Others contend the question Is simpler, being concerned solely with preventing the Russians from batting American or VVcMoru European goods which would aid them in a military sense. Council Reviews Matter Tht whole matter was reviewed by ihe President's top policy making aec-ncy. the National Security Council, last Thursday. Reliable sources who cannot be named say the government then decided that fleps must be taken to prevent the loss of important materials now go- Ing through to the Soviets, The first Important move along this line Is expected to be taken by Secretary of State Achcson when he meets with British Foreign Minister Bcvln and French Foreign Minister Schuman in New York Sept. 12. ' Licenses Cancelled Recently wjrd got out here that » shipment of about 50 tons of the stcfflthardenlng metal molybdenum, e.\«l|:ed from the United Slates to Britain was then transhipped to the Soijet Union. Learning of this the Commerce Department cancelled the license which would have permitted shipment of n large additional quantity, On another phase of the sf>me problem, former Prime Minister Winston Churchill declared In a political speech In Britain Saturday lhat a British factory was turning out tools suitable for the repair of tanks for Ihe Russians. The export control system is very loosely organized. American officials have never been satisfied with the extent lo which Western European governments, needing trade with the east and finding it profitable, were willing lo cooperate In denying Russia certain types of goods. '49 Revenue Sum Topped in July WASHINGTON, Aug. 28. (A>) — rnlerrial revenue collections In July surpassed Ihose of July a year ago by a small margin. The Internal Revenue Bureau announced the figures today, as follows. J.ily 1950—2 billion 263 million dollars. July 1949—2 billion 253 million uollars As between Ihe two months. Individual Income tax collection* dropped about. 79 million dollars and corporation Income taxes dropped about 84 millions. But most other taxes Increased. For example, employment (axes increased 43 million, alcohol taxes •18 million, tobacco taxes 1 million, auto and motorcycle taxes 22 million, and gasoline Uxes 9 mil- Ion. Person's Importance Asked as Criteria for A-Shelter Admittance •BRISTOL. R. I.. Aug. 28. (AP) —A' Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist would grade people for admission to A-bomb shelters "on the basis of (heir inv iwrtance to the United States." Prof. Clarke Goodman, an atomic energy scientist at MIT, said "some people are more Important than others and we can't build shelters for everybody." The professor had been asked by Gov. John O. Pa.store of Rho,1e Island what approach states could make in protecting hie and industry from the A-bomb. The scientist, told the governor that he was "not even sure Rhode Jsland or Massachusetts needed any shelters." "We have got to concentrate on the important points first." he said, "since we are not going lo be able to builtl shelters for all conceivable emergencies." POLE STAR - Yep. ciu'lslnvas is coming and Chicago's getting ready tor il. A workman puts finishing touches on the job of hanging a slalue of M ar y and her lilltc lamb on 3 Stale Street light pole. Mary 15 onu of the Molhcr Goose characters lhat will der-orate the street during Ihu Christmas season. • WHEN KEMousittss, worn urn W, 6*1 n |und ni Vour tirc<l feeling may come! from low blood count. S.S.S. \ tonic KOOMiRlilslMfKhtlowor It I.--— m __ where such w^aknew quite iliMBL aa iW : often bocin;; heir* Ihe body ••CamlM .•build rk?i red blood-Mi mu . •»!>•• ^ UtfaalomachdiKMt' Inci sniwtif*- Al t British Find Uranium Ore LONDON, Aug. 2». (AP) — The British government has announced discovery of the largest single deposit—perhaps a million of tons—of uranium located in the British isles. The ministry of supply said the )re, in Northern Wales, ii of "«- iremely low yield." The ministry linled exploitation might not be The deaprtment of scientific and nduslrial research, however, said :he ore is "in no way inferior" to deposits being wor'Wd by the Russians In East Germany. The scienl- sts calculated the ore would yield 80 grams lless than three ounces) per ton. Scientists say much of the vast area in Utah covered by sagebrush could be reseeded to grass. Mrs. Laura Norris. 1325 A South 6th St., SI. Louis, Mo., says doing ^he family washing and housework is no longer a chore. She says she can do her work in n breeze now. She thanks wonderful HADACOL tor her feeling of well being. She lad deficiencies of Vitamins Bl, B2, Niacin, »nd Iron, which HAD- ACOL contains. Here is Mrs. Norris' exact staternenl: "It was such a long time since I was feeling 'OK.' I had been very nervo;;s and my nerves were so bad it affected my stomach—seems like It was tied In a knot all th« time. Couldn't sleep either—lust roll and toss all night r couldn't hardly tin my house work—«nd I was always cross and Irritable. One d«y I heard about ho» other folks were being helped bj HADACOL. I tried HADACOL and after the 2nd botlle I began to feel better. Now my nerves are steady as can be—no more ill effect on my stomach—r sleep like a Ion—in fact. I feel wonderful, thanks to marvelous HADACOL." Ves, HADACOI,. I* Marvelous in the way it has helped thousands oJ fojks whose systems were deficient in Vitamins 81, B2, Iron, and Nit- cin. HADACOL can help you loo if you will just give HADACOL «' chance. If you ire suffering from nervousness, Insomnia, or a general run-down condillon, caused by such deficiencies, let HADACOL help you as It has helped others all over the country. Many Doctors Recommend HADACOL . HADACOL is , lhat wonderful new product recommended ' by many doctors. U is not a quick- acting product which »ivcs only symptomatic relief—HADACOL Is so successful because It relieves the real cause of stomach disturbances and a general run-down ncrvoui condition when caused by deficiencies of Vitamins Bl, B2, Iron, and Niacin. So If you're troubled this way. don't keep on putting off relieving the real cause of your trouble. Remarkable Improvements »n often noticed within a short time Oel That Wonderful HADACOI- Feeling The grest advantage In taking HADACOL is that continued use of this great product helps prevent such stomach misery and nervousness from coming back to torture you. Know what It means to enjoj that wonderful, wonderful HADA COL feeling! You'll have to adult anyone suffering such deficiencies is very foolish and deserves no sympathy it he or she continues to sufle such sleeplessness, nervousness an- stomach disorder when relief mi hand drugstore Oo nghl now to, or telephone, your nearest druggist for HADACOL TrJal-slie botlle costs only »1J5 L«rge family or hospital size, J3.SO i Refuse substitutes. There Is only tht om^true find genuine HADACOtj i which everyone U talking »boul. I Cow" l"0, Tb« U»I*M OorpmUM HOW DID THAT CET THERE7-TW, odd ,|«M.WU p«*nW to the owner of the damaged and submerged auto wh«n he «turn«d to his ear afljr 11 freak atorm Inundated most of downtown Philadelphia, Ps. Evidently the refrigerator settled on tht «uto'» top at th« flood wateri subsided. Sale of Carroll Property Awaits Court Approval LOS ANGELES, Aug. 28. (AP) — S»le of ttvt'Earl Carroll Mieal«v- restaurunt property in Hollywood lo Frank s. Hofue.s. Texas and Arizona cattleman, awaits approval ol the courts. Mrs. Jessie I. Scimylcr, executrix of the showman's estate, has asked pel mission lo sell the Sunset Boulevard property In Hollywood for |1.025,000. Hearing on her application was jet for Sept. 13. Hofues, who operate* hotels in Dallas *n<i Wichita Kails, Tex., and two beach clubs In Santa Monica, Call I „ agrees to I urn over to the Carroll estate his 4,000-acre Cross- Triangle ranch, 25 mites west of Prescotl. Ariz., and sign two notes. for »200.0<X> and $475,000. KofueV attorney said he wants Didn't Want Help: Just $4,000 Vets on Job* . ., *"*• M. Ml-A man fell In the doorway of . north aide currency exchange last week and cried. "I think i broke my let. help , Mlss ""- el Owtlirle. <9, hurried from behind tier bullel-proof cashier's cage in the exchange to help (he man. He Jumped to his feet menaced her with » 8 , m , nd (orced ' her back Into Ih; cage. Then the gunman look MOW) from i safe and fled. The principal export of Tibet is wool. the Carroll properly for leasing to lelevlsion and radio concerns. The theater has been closed since last October. Carroll, 54. was killed in 19M In « plane crash. Washington Hat Lost His Head? Cops Heard He Had BAI.TIMOnE, Aug. 28. (/Pj-Had George Washington lost his head? was nodding a bit. The police were told he had. The firemen heard only that he As the parks superintendent had it, there was nothing left of old George but a pile of gravel But it was all just rumor. A story spread rapidly that Baltimore s statue of George Washington, which stands alop a 200- foot column, had been decapitated. The report sot as far as Richmond. Va., where a radio station put it, on (he nlr. Some 300 anxious patriots, including representatives of five clly deimlmcuts. hurried lo Washington bquare to check up. N°t °! le to lose his head over a wild lale there slood George as he had for 135 yr . arr . He was perhaps the only one PAGE sevnt M Pensioned Pilot Has No Plans MIAM'l. na, p Aug. X. UM-O»p- tam Fred V. (Shorty) Clark, pilAt on Pan American's flight fietn'Id- "ml lo Belem, Brazil, hain't 4*. cltled what to do next. Yesterday WM retirement dir No 2 lor the pilot who htt covered more than 3.008,000 miies In U years of flying without a linzl* passenger or crew member auffertBi- a scratch. He Joined ihe Navy In 1901. l«.rn- cd to fly in \<n\ and retired (row Ihe Navy In 1929 on a pension. T}w» he Joined Pan American and atart- ed another 20-year career. Clark will be 90 year* old N*v rears Day and becomes Pan Ann- Icon's first pensioned pilot. present with a good, sound Jlis shmilnVrs. Why is it necessary to increase rates when the telephone system is expanding so rapidly? 7 You have a lot of new customers... why do you have to raise rates? The telephone installer says... Sounds itringe at first, but the more new customers we connect to the company's lines here in Arkansas, the less we earn on every dollar invested in Arkansas, The expenses of giving good service have gone up a lot since prewar days—more than $10 Vi million a year. But our big problem is the increased cost of adding new telephones and all the poles, wire, switching equipment, and other facilities it takes.to serve them. Just three years ago, when we ap- "plied for the rates you now pay, the equipment back of each telephone cost, on the average, $223. Last year it cost $412 in added plant for every new telephone. Every time we add a customer at present day costs, our return on each dollar invested goes down. And we have no alternative but to keep on expanding as long as more people want telephones. We earned less than Iwo cents on each dollar invested in Arkansas last year — and that figure is still going down as we spend more dollars for new plant as the number of new customers goes up, That's why it is so extremely Important that rates be increased before we can turn on the green light and go ahead with the $S8 million Greater Arkansas Telephone Program. Many millions of people's savings will need to b« invested in telephone securities. And people won't put up the money unless they see prospects for reasonable earnings. Would you? A WATER ARKANSAS HEEDS A GREATER ARKANSAS TELEPHONE PROGRAM

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