The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 6, 1952 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, October 6, 1952
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MONDAY, OCT. fl, 1951 BLYTHEVltXE (ARK.) COURIER NEW! PAGE THKEE GOP's Say Truman Wou/d Unload 'Blunders' on Gen. Eisenhower SAN FHANCrsco (A—Three Re- , publican senators accuse President Truman of attempting to "unload some of Ills tragic errors in foreign policy" onto the shoulders ot the GOP presidential c a n d I d a t e, Dwight D. Eisenhower. Describing themselvs as a "truth squad," Sens. Homer Ferguson |fMlch), Bourke H. Hickenlooper Commodity And Stock Markets— N«w York Cotton Open High Low 1:15 Oct . 3801 3883 3861 3865 Deo >8TJ 3890 3877 3883 Mch 3883 3900 3883 389. May 3813 3889 3873 3877 New Orleans Cotton Open High Low 1:15 Oct 3869 38'H 3864 3860 Dec 3879 3895 3870 3834 Mch 3885 3899 3885 3883 May . 3878 3892 3878 3819 la) and Francis Case CSD) issued a statement yesterday in answer Truman's Saturday night foreign policy speech in Oakland. The President had charged that isenhower "was personally involved in our decisions about Berlin and Korea." which led to the Berlin blockade and the North Korean invasion. "He can explain from now until doomsday." retorted the senators, but the blame for Berlin and Korea is his. Mr. Truman cannot wipe out the facts. lie cannot shift the blame to those who had no choice but to carry out arid execute his foreign policy decisions." Truman had said Eisenhower, as a general and, later, chief of staff, participated in the high level decisions by furnishing advice. "The President fired Gen Doug- Twelve-Part Sketch-Story Of 'The He/I Bomb' Starts In Today's Courier News las MacArthur on the ground that interfered will) policy-making," charged the Republican senators. •Now he blasts Gen. Eisenhower because he did not disobey Mr. Truman's orders." Actually, they added, Elsenhower opposed policies which led to "disastrous decisions in Berlin and Korea." They said the GOP nominee protested the agreement isolating Berlin behind the Russian zone of Germany, but was ignored. Of Korea, the senators said the U. S. is fighting there because "the late President Roosevelt at Yalta and President Truman ai Potsdam sold out China and bribed Russia to come into the against Japan," Eisenhower, they added, "ad vised against bringing Russia Into the war with Japan." Times Reports Disfavor for Truman Trip City Folks Aid Stock Show's Attendance Soybeans Open High Nov Jim , Mch May 307% . SOS 1 ,!: , 306 309 3C9 307 » 306< 3CQi 305 Low 1:15 H'l 305 ?i 308 V, 308 Vi NEW, YORK lfl>j—The New York Times said today that public re:ic- i people lion ' - is on the whole distinctly un-' favorable" to President Truman's attacks on Gen, Dwight D. Eisenhower, according to reports from Times correspondents in the states. "Most of the resentment express LITTLE ROCK 0V) — "The turned out at night" N«w York Stocks A T and T 153 1-4 Arncr Tobacco 56 1-4 Anaconda Copper 40 1-2 Beth Steel 49 1-8 Chrysler 83 1-4 Coca-Cola 10G Gen Electric 03 5-8 Gen Motors , 60 Montgomery Ward 57 1-4 N Y Central 18 Hit Harvester 31 7-8 J C3 Penney 66 3-4 Republic Steel 39 Radio 27 1-4 socony Vacuum 33 1-B Studebaker 36 1-8 Standard of N J 74 1-2 Texas Corp 52 ;1- £t?;irs 57 7- U S Steel 38 3-8 Sou Pac 41 1-4 ed by persons interviewed," .the Times said, "stemmed from the President's charges that General Eisenhower had given him wrong Information on Russia and Korea, th at the nomin ce was a I temp ting to mnke political capital out of the Korean war, that the general's 'irresponsibility' was the cause of the precautions situation of the United States forces in Berlin." The story said today's survey gave the reaction of "the man In the street and the women in the home and the office." The Times editorially bus backed Eisenhower for president. city but "the rural people didn't get out during the day." That, explained State Sen. Clyde Byrd, secretary-manager of the Ar- 38 1 kansas Livestock Show, was the rea- | son for an attendance drop of some - 40,000 persons under 1951 for this FATALITIES (Continued from Page 1) pairman, died at Kennedy General Hospital last night of injuries suffered yesterday afternoon during the stock car races al Walker Park. Mr. Davis, who was employed by the Prod Callthan Radio and Television Service, was fatally injured when the stock car racer he was driving overturned during one of the races held by the BlythevLUe Stock Car Club. Persons who witnessed the accident said that Mr. Davis apparently lost control of his racer on the back stretch of the dirt track during: the next to the last race of the afternoon. His racer, an old model Dodge, overturned twice, throwing him to the track. Deputy Sheriff Herman Oden, who attended the races, said Mr. Davis' safety belt snapped and he was thrown clear of his racer. He was first taken to Blytheville Hospital in n Cobb Funeral Home a rub ul a nee bu t was un media tely transferred to the Memphis hospital. He died about 30 minutes after his arrival there. Mr. Davis suffered a compound fracture of the skull and a punctured lung. Born in Hald Knob. Mr. Davis had made his home here for the past six years and had been an employe of the Callihan Radio and Television Service for that length of time. Services will be conducted KL 2 p.m. tomorrow at Cobb Funeral A 12-pait illustrated series on the 'development- of the atom bomb and the possibilities of an even more devastating hydrogen bomb begins today In the Courier News. Entitled "The Hell Bomb," the first of these sketch-and-slory strips Is found on Page 2 of today's edition. This series is timed to bring background material on the development of t h c r m o - nuclear weapons prior to new tests scheduled to be held by the U.S. this foil at Etihvetok Atoll In the Pacific. Although no details have been announced, these tests are generally believed to mark, a major step toward the development of nuclear weapons surpassing HI de- stmctivenefis the atom bombs produced to date. Fnvoy Kennon Holds? Silence In Germany FRANKFURT, Germany MP> —U. S. Ambassador George P. Kennan arrived here from Switzerland today but refused any comment on the ( Soviet government's demand that j he be recalled from lite post In I Moscow. ' Met at the railroad station by a score of newsmen and photographers, Kennan said tersely; "I will make no statement on the action of the Soviet government." When n reporter asfced him for comment on the current congress of the Soviet Communist party in Moscow. Kennnn replied grimly: "I will make no statement on Soviet mutters," Obituaries ear's show. Byrd said the 13th annual rvent, which closed Saturday night, drew 180,595 persons while some 223,000 massed through the gates a year ago. ^ The secretary-manager eaid the long summer drouth apparently was responsible for keeping most of the rural people at home. Winning Future Farmers of America and 4-II livestock exhibitors received $25.000 in point money and $10,GBQ in special awards Entry Clerk Raymond McEuen said. RUSSIA Lives rock NATIONAL STOCKYARDS. 111. IiD— (USDA1— Hogs 16,000; fairly acU'e, uneven; weights over 190 pounds mostly 40 to 50 lower than Friday's average; lighter weights 25 to 50 lower; sou's mostly 25 lower; bulk choice 200-230 IBS un- sortcd (or grade 19.T5-90; 240-250 Ibs 19.25-15; few 10.85; heavier weights scarce; 180-190 Ibs 19.5075; 150-110 Ibs n.is-ig.ao; mostly 19.25 down; 120-140 Ibs 14.75-17.00; sows 400 Ibs down 18.00-50; few to 18.75; heavier sows 16.00-17.50; boars 12.50-15.50. Cattle 9,000, calves 2,500; early trading slow; most bids unevenly lower; one load choice yearling steers 32.50; otherwise little done; cows also meeting lower bids from big packers; bulls and vealers steady; utility and commercial bulls 16.50-20.00. Former Resident Dies n Washington Stare Word has been received here of he death of W. W. Rhodes, 65, ornier Blytheville resident, who has een making his home in Tuyallup, Vash. Mr. Rhodes died Friday at Tuyl!up. - ' He was born in Blytheville and attended schools here, moving away vlien he was a young man. Survivors include his wife, a half- iister, Mrs. W. J. Pollard, and a lalf-brother* R, O. Blacku'ell, both of Blytheville. He was the sou of Mrs. R. Blackwell. Elevator Strike Agreement Made CHICAGO (/Pj—Striking APL elevator operators today accepted i settlement proposal by the Build- Ing Managers Association and a un ion spokesman said the operator would return to work "as soon possible." Today was the sixth day of Hi strike—the first of its kind in th city's history. Some 400.000 Loop of ! fice workers were idled by the walk out of 1,500 operators. Contents of the settlement pro posal were not revealed. The strik ers had demanded a 40 hour wee with 48 hours pay. The present scale for a 48 hour week is $76.96. (Continued from Page 1) gress sessions.) The keynote address, delivered in the past by Stalin himself, presumably laid the basts for policies be approved by the Congress. .Malenkov is generally regarded as Stalin's most likely successor.) Also on the agenda of the Congress sessions, expected to last week, are approval of the new five-year plan launched 18 months ago for vast increases in industrial and agricultural production, and major changes in the party's N. TRUMAN CContinued from Page I) withheld until a]] the stops can be filled in. The Truman strategists aboard this train are headed by Matthew J. Connelly, secretary to the President. The speech writing crew is led by Charles S. Murphy, special counsel to Truman. Truman's current 8,5QO mile, 15- day coast-to-coast trip winds up in New York Saturday with two organizntion, including replace' ment of the Politburo and Organ izntkm Bureau (Orgburo) by B Presidium. M a 1 e n k o v's bitter charges against the United States were pre- j ceded by "similsir accusations from • another Politburo member, former Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov, who denounced U. S, "ruling circles" for creating "aggressive war alliances like the North Atlantic bloc directed against peace-loving states of the Soviet Union, the Chinese Peoples Republic and countries oE the peoples democracies." "The bosses of the United states," said Molotov, *'. . . knew from the experience of the Hitler- ites . . . that it was impossible even to dream about world domination without the use of force." Malenkov charged the United States with creating bases throughout the world and "remilitarizing Home by the Rev. P. H. Jernigan, pastor of Calvary Baptist Church. Burial will be in Dogwood Cemetery. Survivors Include his wife and three sons, Bobby, Donald and Kenneth Davis, all of Blytheville. Other survivors include his father, Bertie R. Davis, Tyler, Tex.; a sister, Mrs. Emigene Dedue. Potosi, Mo., and four brothers, Billie Ray and Jack Davis. Ft. Jackson, S. C., and Buddie 'and Jerry Davis, of Tyler, Tex. Clarence Johnson, Wilson Negro, \vas found late yesterday ne;i the Frisco tracks near Bassett. Officers believe he was struck by train sometime yesterday. Coroner E. M. Holt and Sheriff William Berrymau, the death, said injuries indicate the Negro was hit by a train. The investigation (s continuing, Sheriff Berryman said. Johnson was caretaker of Bassett Cemetery. Hurt In Collision In a collision on Highway 61 about four miles north of the Arkansas-Missouri state Hne last nigh't, Mr. nnd Mrs. W. M, Burns of Blyiheville and their granddaughter, Darian Claire O'Keefe of Memphis, were slightly injured. Mr. Burns received a slight knee injury, Mrs. Burns suffered bruises and shock and their granddaughter I received a head injury. Mr, Burns, said all were in good condition £b}!s morning. Dariau is the five- year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack O'Keefe of Memphis, former Blytlieville residents. A Missouri State Highway Patrol- mail said the accident occurred about 6:15 p.m. yesterday when a cr.r driven by Robert II. Vied ot Steele. Mo., apparently ran off the highway. In attempting to get bacx onto the highway, Mr. Vied's car Sub Canyon Discovered In Atlantic NEW YORK WV—Scientists have discovered a vast new submarine L canyon, possibly part of an uncler- I seas channel system comparable in EISENHOWER extent to the Mississippi River nnd its tributaries, on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. Dr. W. Maurice Ewing. an oceanographer and professor of geology at Columbia University .announced this finding yesterday after he and a party of "scientists and students returned from a ID.OCO-mile research voyage on the sea-going tug, Kevin Moran. (Continued troni Page I) and true Americanisms without getting into partisan politics." Based on Religious Faith At Livingston, he said Americanism was based on religious faith and (his included honesty and integrity in government. He added that through honesty and integrity 'we will find the pinks; we will find the Communists; we will find the disloyal," He said the older generation must pass on lo youths the errors of Ihe past. He said those errors meant "we have fallen Into two world wars in the lust seven years Then at Bozeman, Mont., he said "The things that happened to us because we have had poor leader- STEVENSON (Continued from Page 1) and Minnesota at the close o( last week, Stevenson bore down on the premise that, the American people liavc been pretty happy r.r.d prosperous for the better part of 20 years under Democratic adminis- Iration. That, obviously, was Intended to counter the Republican tlme-for-a-change chant, and El- senhowcr's statements that dollars aren't worth as much as they used to be. The Illinois governor summed U up in Minneapolis when he hit a' the GOP as talking about false prosperity. "False prosperity, indeed, 1 ' he snorted. "As false as money In (lie bank, ferti^er In the soil, a new tractor, and a new washing machine. "You 'A'iH find your reasons for supporting the Democratic party n debt-free farms, tn markets for F our harvest. In your strong cooperatives, in the homes you own, n the vacations you take. ... in your new security . . ., In schools In plans you cnn make for your future." All day long Saturday, at Ft. Dodge, la., then at Minneapolis and •ould b« part ot a "murctartnf row" i« the Senate, in charg* o* key committees, it the Republicans elect to office all the candidate Eisenhower as endorsed. Warns of Depression Stevenson advised the workman, the farmer — everyone — to beware because "the dominant QU Guard of the Republican party has captured the candidate and will even torpedo your foreign policy." Then, in one of the broadest swipes he has taken so far at the rival party the Democratic nominee went on to say: "With do-nothing, care-nothing, mindless mumbo-jumbo they will let America and (.he world slide into depression. And such misery bears the seeds of another world 'ar. 'They are the party of confu- lon, hesitation, weakness, and that the signpost that points to dis- ster and war." ship are obvious. We have no peace abroad we have great expenditure programs here; we have deficits , In our budget; and we have had told newsmen who met the \ shamcful crookedness in high tug that the canyon was discovered by echo soundings. He said it appeared to be 250 to 300 feet deep and one to two miles wide. The canyon was located 800 miles off and a little north of Boston at a depth of three miles. places and In low places In the federal jjovernment. 'All'of that we must eliminate. 'Inally at Si. Paul, Stevenson took larder and harder swats at Eisenhower and the OOP. He built up to a climax In St. Paul, where he named names and even called a lew. "Captives of Old Guard' He called Eisenhower a captive to the OOP "Old Guard." n man who "seems to have embraced 01 been embraced by the most reck less and embittered wtng of his party." He said Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin is a "champion of Uv inquisition, champion of trial b; ordeal and slander." He said Sen. Robert A. Tatt o Ohio Is the political mentor of th general and a man who has "made opposition a matter of principle." While his audience cut lopse with lusty boos, Stevenson s'aid McCarthy, Taft, and other GOP senators Negro Deaths CreditAmendment- Ruled Off Ballot LITTLE ROCK.(/Pj—The Arkansas Supreme Court today ruled that the proposed "Modern Consumers' Credit Amendment" will not appear on the Nov. 4 general election ballot. Chief Justice Griffin Smith dissented. The proposed amendment would have empowered the Legislature to authorize other charges on loans in addition to the maximum interest rate of 10 per cent. Head Courier News Classified Ads, FREE $1.00 Tube Pile Ointment Noted Clinic Makes Most Unusual Offer to Any Afflicted Person— No Coupon—No Charge In ord to introduce to anyone who i- '.micled with Piles (Hem- orrhol' i or any similar rectal condition, the Thornton Minor Cllnio will send free oji request, * full- size 51.00 tube of Thornton Minor Pile Ointment—tree and postagft paid. Eetid only your full name, nge and address—no money Is required. This offer Is limited and may be withdrawn at any time, so w« suggest you write at once. Addresa Thornton Minor Clinic, 911-A Linwood Blvd., Kansas City 3, Mo, This offer is »exactly as stated above— no charge—na obligation—no bill now or later. stump upstate New York from speeches. Before that he will West Germany and Japan" for 'criminal purposes." These were some of his other charges against the United States: atom and germ weapons and re- where he speaks Friday With the Courts Chant-cry Ray Hurley vs. Stanley Keller nnd E. V. McLcmorc, doing business [is McLcmore Auto Sales, to void contract and damages. Buffalo, night. Second Trip Soon The second trip into New England, with speeches likely in Hartford and New Haven, as well as Boston, will follow within less than a week Truman's return to Washington Sunday. The Midwestern trip likely will wind up the campaign. The President was to make his biggest speech today in the field house of Brigham Young nlversily at Provo, Utah. In England the radiator ornament on an automobile is called the "mascot." John Mason Services for John Mason, &4j will be conducted at 11 a.m. tomorrow in (he Home Funeral Home Chapel by Rev. R. C. McCoy. Burial will be In thn Burton Spur Cemetery. He died Saturday at his home on Denny Street. RITZ THEATRE Manila, Ark. SPEC/AC was thrown Into the opposite traffic lane and struck Mr. Burns' car, the officer said. Mr, Bvirns was driving south and Mr, Vied was northbound. Mr. Vied was not hurt RUPTURED? Urii HKIHH IHI.h RIJF1IJHI-. O.Vf.V The DOBBS TRUSS IS DIFFERENT CITY DRUG CO. YOUR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS •101 East Main BlytbevUle THIS WEEK BEAUTIFULLY REBUILT (XPERT! SIGN - TUBS "THE WINNING TEAM" Doris Ray & Ronald Reagan WED -THURS FEUD1N' FOOLS Leo Goreey & The Bowery Boys duce conventional armaments." The Soviet Union wants to do so. The U. S. "refuses to conclude , peace pnct." Russia wants one, MOX Phone 4021 _ Weekdays 7:00 Show Starts Sat. Sun 1:00 Always a Double Feature Aircoriditioned By Refrigeration LAST TIMES TON1TE Double Feature I'opeye Cartoon & Shorts HEATRE OSCEOLA YOUR FRIENDLY THEATRE LAST TIMES TONITE "THE PRIDE of ST. LOUIS" Hobart, the capital of Tasmania. is said to have one of the finest harbors in the world. NEW Air Conditioned By Refrigeration "Your Community Center" MANILA, ARK. Matinees Sat. & Sun. Phone 58 Dan Dailey TUESDAY FEUDIN' FOOLS The Rovvery Boys MONDAY "UNTAMED FRONTIER" Joseph Gotten Shelly Winters WED -THURS "MONTANA TERRITORY" In Technicolor Lon McAllister TUESDAY 'RED SNOV/' Guy Madison Gloria Sanders WED-THURS "DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK" Richard Widmark Marilyn Monroe I DIDN'T KNOW... .. = until my neighbor told me that the best place to find terrific bargains is in the COURIER classified ads. I know now! I always read them! Complete with 9 ATTACHMENTS PLUS IONO EXTENSION CORD Rebuilt with Capitol Parti 2 Y»ir Writtn l9ira»lM WRITE FOR FREE HOME DEMONSTRATION NEXT WEEK obligation, I want o TRtt Horn* D«oioi>ilmtlo r»llr gwrooKxl REBUILT UICTXOLUX HfXT Ads placed before 9 a.m. will appear same day. All classified advertising payable in advance. /UFMFi SEED New Crop OKLAHOMA APPROVED RETAIL 46c PER LB. NO WEED SEED BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS BLYTHEVILLE SOYBEAN CORP 1800 West Main St. Phone 856 Blytheville, Ark.

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