The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 2, 1952 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, October 2, 1952
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Page 5
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THURSDAY, OCT. 2, 1952 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Taft Warns Young GOP- 'Watch Overconfidence By RICHARD K. SMITH i CLEVELAND 1* _ Sen . Roberl A. Taft will tell Republicans in Chios three biggest cities this week the GOP can win the Nov. 4 election, but only by hard work Last night he told a Yoiin^ GOP rally here the party "can't°afford the overcontidence ot 1948." The coming election is "the final decision," he said, on "whether we are going to go ahead on the principles of the last IBS years or go so far toward socialisation and government control that we can't, turn back." The people realize the importance of this election. Taft said, and "arc more interested in politics than they ever have been in the past." The senator said record voter registrations show "a determination on (he part of our people to rise up and eliminate from our government the socialization the people resent from the bottom of their hearts." But, Taft added, GOP party workers can profit from this interest only by hard Jailor and a determined election day cliovt to see that their registered voters yo to the polls. Taft viewed Ohio as a pivotal state In a close presidential contest. He said a majority in the great state of Ohio may be the final determining factor in tlie elec tion of a Republican president.' "We can win the election," he said. "Reports are encouraging People are interested. Conservative estimates are that 3>,2 million will vote in Ohio—the largest vote n history." Bidding for that vote on behalf of the Republican ticket which six months ago he was fighting to head, Tart speaks in Columbus to- ilght at a county GOP campaign opener and again tomorrow night. Monday he appears at his home city of Cincinnati. He campaigned in Ohio last week with Gen. Dwfght D. Eisenhower, who defeated him for the party's nomination, but in those appearances he'made a special effort to keep in the background. At the end of his current 19-state lour, which will take him to all parts of tlie country exrppi. the southeast and New Enland, Taft will return lo campaign in Ohio for three more days on the weekend before election. Admitting his loss of the nomination "was a disappointment to me, naturally, and to my friends," Taft made it clear to his audience he wanted them to join in an all-out crusade against "the danger to liberty today—big government." Gov. Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois, the Democratic presidential candidate, is "no different from Truman in his philosophy of government." Taft said. Under that philosophy, he added, "the government will plan your life and my life; the government will tell us what we should do." - Und,er recent .Democratic administrations, he said, "the idea of emergency power — something like the divine right of kings—has IN OFTHE1M SERVICE THEIR COMMUNITIES ANOTHER NATION BY AM ERICA'S STAMP STARS NEWSPAPERBOYS-This postage stamp honoring America's newsboys, will go on first-day sale Oct. •! in Philadelphia, Pa. The commemorative was issued in Philadelphia to honor Benjamin franklin, as first newsboy, and Philadelphia newsboys who were flrst to carry U. S. Treasury Savings Stamps on > door-to-door sales camoaisn during World War II. PAGE FIV» ATOM CANNON' MAKES ITS BOW — The U.S. Army's giant cannon, dfslgned to deliver an atomic shell deep into enemy territory, rests in firing position at the Aberdeen, Md., Proving Ground after being unloaded from carrying vehicle. The 85-ton weapon, the Army's largest completely mobile gun, can fire a 12-inch shell 20 miles. (AP Wircpholo) Anglican Cleric Denied U.S. Visa LONDON (/PI—An Anglican clergyman who tried at past United Nations Assemblies to get. South Africa censured for its treatment of Negroes says U. S. immigration regulations are keeping him from the U. N. Assembly opening in New York Oct. 14. The Rev. Michael Scott told a news conference he had applied for a visa at the U. S. Embassy here July 30 but refused to swear he was never a member of a totalitarian organization or to say in what organizations he held membership. Mama Bear Rescues Cub VANCOUVER. Canada Wj—A little brown bear, caught in a tree here by Francis Stewart, was locked in a shed in the garden. It wasn't long before the mama bear arrived to shatter the shed door and dra = her offspring back into the woods. Man (s Convicted In Bribery Case PORTLAND. Me. (/D—A Boston public relations man was convicted early today of conspiring with a wine merchant to bribe a state of. ficial in connection with Maine's liquor sales monopoly, a political issue In Gov. Frederick G. Payne's successful Senate campaign last month. Tlie official—since resigned—was acmiitted. The wine merchant was riot indicted. A Cumberland County Superior , Court jury 'returned a verdict j against Frederick W. Papalos and announced ncquittal for Bernard T. Zahn ot Bremen, former State Liquor Commission chairman, Lighting experts say that if s\ light is placed some distance away and a yellow light where people wish to congregate, the bugs will tend lo congregate around the distant light rather than where the people assemble. , permeated our government.' 1 "Stopping the .spending is one remedy for the present condition/ Taft said, and added this "Stevenson says you can't do, because the Russians have Imposed it on us." "No matter what Democrat is elected, he can't clean out the bureaucrats," Taft asserted. Mediators Seek End to Strike CHICAGO Wi—Federal mediators moved today in an attempt to end an elevator operators' strike which has crippled business operations in more than 100 office buildings in Chicago's downtown district. The strike, stemming from R dispute over wages and hours, affected an estimated half million daily users of the 120 struck buildings. Thousands of office workers in the loop skyscrapers were made idle as many firms closed when the strike started yesterday. Venezuela Stops Latest Rebel Battle CATiACAS. Venezuela (<J>j—Vene- zuela's government says it has crushed the latest in a scries ot recent uprisings after a 2'=-hour fight in which tlu-ee rebels—Including the leader—were killed and 13 wounded. nebels. led by a eioup of Army officers, seized temporary control of police headquarters at Malurln in Eastern Venezuela at dawn yesterday but were ousted by loyal troops soon nfterwarrt. a general slnff communique said. Miicurln Is the capital of Monnens State. The latest skirmish raised lo 13 Hie number of persons killed since .\tonday, when three unsuccessful attempts were put down In Por- Ulgilesa State. Recruiting Inducement KUALA LUMPUR. Malaya </Tj— Chinese guilds and associations are offering cash grants lo Chinese families if their sons volunteer to Special Purchase Sale 7QQ I9-2G In. fa// / .77 Your Choice COMPARABLE DOLLS SELL FOR 9.38-SAVE Comparable dolls by same manufacturer sell for $2 more elsewhere —sav« al Wards Special Purchase price. Shown h»r« are ju»t a few from Words wonderful assortment—each one an outstanding volua. Baby, Brid* and Girl Dolls complete the selection from which to chocs*. Saran hole can be combid, curled, Washed and "permanent-waved." tv- erylhing in hoir sryii,i<j, too, from pig- toils to poodle cuts. Som« Saran hair k actually rooted into dcJI'i head; others, hov« molded hair. Dolls are made of lalrx, vinyl or unbreakable plastic, with siies ranging from 19 in. to 26 in. All have sleeping • yes—some have cry voices. Each one wears o lovely dresij some are in Christening clothes, othed wear Baby dresses or Litlle'-Girl frocks. All clothing is beautifully mod* with fine details of Ifim and button closings. Many added features — halt, pelticooll, pinaforei, hair ribbons and olher allrocliv* trims. You'll find just rhe doll you want here a* Wardi, for thai special little 9 irl — hwry i<v $1 DOWN OH LAY-AWAY HOLDS DOLL TILL DEC 15 AIR-CONDITIONED LAST TIMES TONITE "BELLES ON THEIR TOES" .Teannie Crain & Mama Loy MOX Phone .1821"— Show Starts Weekdays 7:00 Sat. Sun 1:00 Always a Double Feature Aircondiliuncd By Refrigeration THURS-FRI BURT DOROTHY LANCASTER • McGUIRE EDMUND 1 GWENNl HltlASD MirchTil WEBB • BENNETT • CUMMIKGS • GWENN join the Malayan police force. A total of 12 associations have advertised inch offers In the drive (o enroll 400 Chinese in the force. The highest, offer is $165. Read Courier News Classified Ads. RITZ THEATRE Manila, Ark. LASTTIMESTONITE " Force of Arms' Williiim Holder. Nancy Olson Frank I.ovejoy FRIDAY 'HIGH SIERRA' Humphrey Ida [;u|iino SATURDAY "MONTANA INCIDENT" Whip Wilson SAT. OWL, SHOW "Lost Volcano" Romlm the Jungle B'oy NEW Air Conditioned By Refrigeration ""Your Community Center** MANILA, ARK. Matinees Sat. & Sum. Phone 58 J-AST 'TIMES TONITK "WALK EAST ON BEACON" George Murphy Virginia Gilmore FRIDAY 'DALLAS' Rulh Roman Gary Cooper SATURDAY "Old Oklahoma Plains" Rex Allen SAT. OWL SHOW 'The Firs* Time' Robert Cummings Barbara Hale 2 Cartoons R. C. FARR & SONS Distributors Fuel Oil Kerosene Lee Tires PETROLEUM Gasoline Tractor Fuel L«e Tires PRODUCTS "Serving the Public for 20 Years" Phone 400 So. Railroad St Phon ' r FAST-DRYING NYLON TRICOT Excellent buys 2.98 Sizes 32 fo 38 lovely, sheer 15-dem'er nylon tricols are a washday pleasure for everyone. See how quickly Ihey dry and no Ironing is needed. Prelly and feminine, they dress-i>p suits or skirls. While, pastels, darks. NYLON DRESSMAKER STYLES o je feveraj £. f Sizes 34 to -10 Dressmaker styles ore big news in Sweaters Ihis fall. Wards tios them in time-saving, thrift-priced nylon. Assorted novelty necklines that ore smart for school of office. While, paslels or rich new dark shades. ALL-WOOLS ARE TOP VALUES Fall colors I f . / O Misses' size* Here ofe soft, warm 100% wool Coals—very vnusuaf at this low price. All hove hand-mac/a buKcn-holes, royon satin Imings. Many are velveMrimmea*, some In popular textured fabrics. Fall's newest styles.

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