The Mercury from Pottstown, Pennsylvania on September 28, 1942 · Page 2
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Mercury from Pottstown, Pennsylvania · Page 2

Publication:
Location:
Pottstown, Pennsylvania
Issue Date:
Monday, September 28, 1942
Page:
Page 2
Start Free Trial
Cancel

PAGE TWO Phone 2263 POTTSTOWN MERCURY, POTTSTOWN, PA. MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1943 FORMER COAST GUARD CUTTER SINKS BIG SUB Davey Jones Opens Locker LONDON, Sept, 27 «-TV The former United States Coast Guard cutter Chelan, which quit the prosaic job of hunting iceborgs in the North Atlantic to stalk U-boats, rammed and sank a bis ocean-going Italian submarine and possibly sent another to the bottom in a recent Atlantic bout. The spectacular and sinele-hand- ed feat of the 250-foot vessel, renamed the Lulworth when she joined the British Navy last year, was told today by the- Admiralty which usually doesn’t tell about such things but felt this was too good to keep. Sub Blown to Surface The flght started, the Admiralty related, when a lookout sighted the 1332-ton Italian submarine.; Pietro Calvi. The sub crash-dived but was blown to the surface by the cutter's depth charges. Lulworth gunners scored direct hits with shell and machine gun fire, killing the submarine commander and all but one of its gun crew. This, the Admiralty related, “completely demoralized" the rest of the Italian sailors. Then Lieutenant Commander C. Gwinner, skipper, gave the order to ram the Pietro Calvi and sent the Lulworth knifing into the submarine sttarbord quarters. The Pietro Carvi turned on its side, dumping many Italians into the sea. That was enough for Mussolini’s men who thereupon surrendered. A boarding party from the Lulworth started toward the submarine which sank before the party got there. Second Sub Hit A second Italian submarine surfaced nearby. The Lul worth’s searchlights picked it out in the 'arkness and the former cutter’s gunners plastered the conning tower with direct hits before the submarine could dive. The cutter stayed around for hours looking without success for the second submarine and it was impossible to ascertain whether it too was sunk. Thirty-six survivors were picked up meanwhile from the Pietro Calvi. The submarine’s navigating officer, identified by the Admiralty as a former Olympic swimmer, struck out toward the Lulworth with such a vigorous championship crawl that in the excitement a Lulworth sailor mistook him for a torpedo. A trim, 1983-ton ship, the Lulworth was among nine U. S. cutters transferred to the British in 1941. Her turbo-electric engines are capable of driving her at 16 knots and she has an 8000-mile range. MAJOR PARTIES BEGIN DRIVES TO LIST VOTERS HARRISBURG. Sept. 27 (£>) Both major political parties in Pennsylvania put on last-week registration drives this week for the November 3 general election as opposing candidates settle dow-n to the final month of campaigning. Saturday is the deadline for voters to qualify for a ballot under the state’s permanent registration system, except ui Philadelphia, and party workers down to the precincis have been instructed to concentrare their efforts in getting unregistered voters enrolled. The registration books closed in Philadelphia several weeks ago. Democratic leaders during the last week emphasized the need jf getting out the vote. At the same time Republican chieftains pointed to the present GOP registration majority of 650,000 votes and stressed efforts to’increase it. The registration for the primary was Republicans. 2,604.734, and Democrats, 1,937,137. Martin in West Adjutant General Edward Martin, the Republican nominee for Governor, and his running mates will campaign in the western and northwestern sections of the state, visiting Allegheny and Beaver counties on Tuesday; Armstrong and Clearfield counties on Wednesday: Eri*1 county on Thursday; Warren and McKean counties on Friday and wind up the week in Potter county Saturday. Auditor General F. Clair Ross, the Democratic gubernatorial nominee will start a series of radio talks over state stations on Thursday, in addition to his other campaign activities. WAR MANPOWER 7 ; ---------;;----- r~z —:------^ 7 — group REPORTS Royersford - Spring City nnnrp QlipPCCQ harley b brandreth, Rep. U II U h II OwWVltOl#j Phone 158, Sacond Avenue *nd Main Street, Royersford WASHINGTON. Sept. 27 (JP)~ Officials of the War Manpower Commission reported today that the order restricting loggers and certain miners in 12 western states from transferring to other work had reduced the labor loss in those industries by 80 percent or more in the three weeks it has been in effect. ‘Very Good’ They declared that the early results of the order—the closest ap- GRACE LUTHERAN INSTALLS OFFICERS Queen Elizabeth Confined to Bed LONDON. Monday, Sept. 28 (JP)— Queen Elizabeth has been confined to bed for the past week with acute bronchitis, Buckingham Palace announced early today, raying at the same time that there was no cause BERWYN WINS OVER SC HIGH BY 14-0 Two World War I freighters and two ferryboats, sunk 15 year- ago at a Philadelphia pier, have been raised and are being cut up for the 3000 tons of scrap metal they contain. One of the freighters is in the background and one of the ferryboats between it and the pile of scrap on the dock. Power Commission Joins Anti-Inflation War Churchill Praises American Shipyards LONDON, Sept. 27 (JP) — Prime Minister Winston Churchill today hailed the “completion of nearly 500 large ocean-going cargo vessels 111 the short space of the past 12 months” by American shipyards and workers as a “record beyond compare'* in a broadcast message read by United States Ambassador John G. Winant. “Your countrymen have placed in service in the Intense sea battle a total of nearly 5,300.000 deadweignt tons of shipping during the year ending today,” said the Prime Minister’s message which was read on the anniversary of the launching 0 i the Patrick Henry, first liberty ship. This record of construction, ne added, was "almost unbelievable.” “I am glad to. join in the United Nations' salute to the victory fleef, to the men who are building these ships and the men who are sailing them on the seven vas ” DOYLESTOWN, Sept. 27 (JP) ~ Adjutant General Edward Martin. Republican candidate for governor, speaking here yesterday, declared that the Commonwealth must launch a great campaign of saving to make a state tax cut possible. “The commander-in-chief of our Army and Navy needs this money to carry on the war,” he said. He urged civilians to save rubber, gasoline, scrap metal and food, asserting, “we have got to save every dollar we can for the armed forces.” U. S. AIR FORCE ACTIVE IN CHINA WASHINGTON, Sept. 27 (JP }—’The Federal Power Commission took a hand today in the price stabilization effort, ordering utility companies not to pass war taxes on to the consumer. The Commission’s policy was enunciated in an order to the Panhandle Eastern pipe line company. It came in the midst of Congressional consideration of the anti-inflation bill, to which Senator Norris find.. Neb.), has proposed an amendment freezing public utility and freight rates at the levels of Sept. 15. Norris declared that utility rates; were a factor in living costs. His amendment is still pending, overshadowed by the quarrel over farm prices Hat«* Reducton Ordered The Power Commission ordered the bi«: midwestern gas pipe line company and its affiliate, Illinois Natural Gas company, to reduce j rates by $.5,094,384. The order dis- j cussed the tax element in comput- * ing rates, saying that increased tax burdens result from the war and that these increased tax loads “must be borne by the utility which enjoys a monopolistic position in the economic field, as well as by others who have no such advantage,” On the eve or resumption of Senate debate on the anti-inflation bill there were new appeals in behalf of the compromise formula for relating the prices the farmer receives to the money he pays for labor. Tydings Speech Senator Tydings <D., Mci.i, asserted in a speech prepared for radio delivery that farm labor costs must be covered by farm prices to halt a continued migration from the farm to highly paid factory jobs and avert a food shortage. Tydings is a co-author of the compromise plan, an amendment which Administration leaders seized upon as the means of defeating the farm bloc on its proposal that farm wages be added to the parity level and farm ceiling prices fixed accordingly. Officers and teachers were installed yesterday morning in the for anxiety. Royersford Grace Lutheran church, j -While the Queen is making good Those inducted by Pastor R. L progress towards recovery and there Winters were: i is no cause for anxiety. Her Maj- Superintendent, J, Lowell Groff: esty will be unable to resume her proach the Government has e\er j ajusocja^ superintendent, Donald normal activities for the next three made to job freezing —were \eiv jOodshall; secretary. H. E. Schrack, weeks,” the Palace announcement good better than expected.’ j James Newborn and Robert Weikel; Chairman Paul V. McNutt of the treasurer. Paul Hunsberger; pianist, commission, pointing out that the .Miss Phyllis Stafford. MKs Doris order contains no provision for Nettles and Miss Evelyn Reitnour; transferring persons from other in- direetrar of religious' educationrMrs dustries to those it affects and that r . l . Winters, it would be practically impossible . Teachers in main department: | Mrs Albert Yerk, Miss Marion Ayres, Russell Hcck, Miss Mary Bauers, Raymond Hunsberger, ‘Mrs Herbert Cooke, Mrs. Kenneth Hippie, John Fetterolf, Mrs. Donald Ayres, Donald Godshall, Mrs. Wil- j iam Wenzel. Mrs. Esther Cook. Mrs. Russell Thomas. Miss Arline ■ Winter, Mrs. George Lewin, the Rev. ¡George B. Pifer, Mrs. Raymond Royersford citizens added ap- Hollenbach, N. A. Yerger, John proximately 30 more tons of scrap Schrack. when the Salvage committee staged Substitute teachers, main de- another collection Saturday. So partment: Mrs. C. R. Wagner, Mrs. great was the response the com- cteWHvp hflnHnnart*« iIrvln Johnson, Mrs. Fred Heller, mittee was forced to continue the notified lnrqi hnntrte ! !Mlss Gladvs Wen*el. Mi*s PHyllls i collection until next Saturday, notitled local boards to terminate Stafford and Edwin Finkbiner. when the Borough truck will make occupational deferments for such officers and teachers of Chil- another round workers unless they could show that; dren‘S division: Superintendent The committee had planned to Mrs. L. Earl Frederick; associate collect salvage matter on all of superintendent. Mrs. James New- Main, Church and Chestnut «&->., born; secretary, Mrs. Ion Buck- an(j se;ond av., but barely finished waiter; pianist. Mrs. Emma Col- tw0 Wards because practically every a j \ ^eilcel block yielded a load of scrap. The Nuiseiy department: Mrs. J. committee offered its apology to Lowell Gioff, superintendent: Mrs. pe0pie overlooked and announced to apply it to farm labor, has said that a universal service lawr was "inevitable.” Actions Taken WMC officials said considerable co-operation had been given so far by Government agencies in enforcing the order. Here are various actions that were taken: WMC directed that jobs be refused in plants holding Government contracts to affected loggers 1 and miners who failed to get certificates of separation. quitting their jobs was not adverse to the war effort. WPB extended the work-week for the loggers from 40 to 48 hours. concluded. The Queen was 42 years old on August 4. 'FORD CITIZENS GIVE 30 MORE TONS OF SCRAP Spring City High school football eleven dropped the opening game of the season to Berwyn by a score of 14 to 0 before a large crowd 011 the local campus Saturday afternoon. Acquitting themselves in an impressive manner, the local gridders were against superior odds, which was the cause of the reverse. The visitors scored ®n the first and last periods and were prevented from scoring additional counters by clev ­ er defeope^work on the part of the Blue nnd White. Snring City Ben; \ n Nelson ................. ................. Braun Tnvlor .................,, LT. . . R. DsSerafano Bible ............ .LG.. ...... Scart0Z7,i Stott......................... ...... Carvenelo Hish ............... ■ PO.. ............... Barber RT. . . B DeSerafano Dobbs ................. . .RE. . .. Appiccia fuoco Thomoson .......... . QB.. ............... Griffith De Walt ............... ..LH.. ............... Metzler Bainbrtdge _____ ■ RM . ......... Matthew» Kelm ............. . .FB.. .................... Ma-'.zi Score by periods: Berwyn ........................................ 7 0 0 7 ! Spring City ......... ....................... 0 0 0 0 0 Touchdown* -Appicciaiuoco. Mct/.ìer. Point«, aftor touchdown R. Scrutano. Referre—-HiRhfielri. Vlllanova, Umpi e I —Barcley, U. of P. MARRIAGE ANNOI N(’EI) Announcement was made of the ! recent marriage of Corp. Lewis Calcinore, Berlin, Md.. and Miss Anna Gazzillo, Grant st ., Phoenix, ville. The couple was wedded in ; that borough Saturday, Sept. 5. Corp Calcinore is a son of James Calcinore. Summer st., Royersford. GUNMEN LOOT LARGE MARKET John Boyer and Miss Jane Randall; kindergarten department. Miss Anna Katz, superintendent; Mrs Russell Heck and Mrs. William Shaner. ------------- ! Newborn, superintendent; Mrs. Harry PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 27 ^ _ ! Fr*de™k' Rl£hi\rd fppehlmer Three well-dressed and self-assured a , E\ehn Bush; junior de­ gunmen robbed a Great Atlantic IPayment. Mrs. Warren Leighton, and Pacific Tea company self-serv- suprnn en Ruth Fied- ice market of $3000 early today after kidnaping the manager and driving him to another part of the city to get the keys. The manager, Edward J Stewart 35, told police the holdup men were parked across his driveway when nc came home shortly after midnight. One of the men opened the door of his car, he said, and asked him for a push; then jammed a gun into they would be called upon the coming Saturday. Included 111 the collection Saturday were a number of German hel- ~ . , . . . mets from World war 1. manv chil- ^!^j!!SSSS!L?St. dm* toys and a large clock donated by Harvey Trunk. The truck carted away 14 loads before 5 j o’clock. Aiding in the collection were Bertram Brandreth and W. D. Geiser, , co-chairmen of the committee; 16 Boy Scouts, Oscar Crockett, W. I. 1 Fox, Herman Metzler and Jack ; Corbin. Anybody whose scrap was not ! removed Saturday or those who ------------------ may fltKj anym2re should place it Funeral set vices will be held Mon- along the curb line for the coming day morning for FRANK A. ( I T IL- Saturday, especially those on Se ■^v Si, w»?3 ST- ond av„ which the committee did PHOENIXVILLE, cafe prorietor and not reach at all the past Satur- erick; substitute teachers, Mrs, Edwin Finkbiner, Miss Lois Matt he w4 and Miss Grace Lick. DEATHS-FUNERALS his ribs and told him to get in the . former shoe dealer, who died Thurs- dav, back seat. \ day night. The other two then entered the Mr, Cutillo, brother of Mrs. Goef car. he said; one of them took tn?ffrey Golie, Royersford, was stricken Group Protests Magazine Ban NEW YORK, Sept, 27 (/Pi—The | American Civil Liberties Union pro- j tested today the action of the Post- j office department in revoking the second-class mailing privileges of a j number of magazines on grounds of j obscenity. Playwright Elmer Rice, chairman o' the organization’s National Council on Freedom From Censorship, urged an investigation in letters to the postoffice committees of the Senate and House. Remarkable Treatment FOR PAIS OF STOMACH ULCERS Due to Gastric Hyperacidity tortuita «itfe : a wi»*rj ot * free «tomtfh | of Ult f»mnu* VOU TABLET* |r j fifingin* oomMrUin ft i l(*f 1« hundred» at *ueti | Sinrrr»^ f[*t» fui oeop!»* rel) ot wlmt the? etli fli« <* ________ Von'» Tablet* h»»* don* to r iSmb Thit gfnrie rorrcul* aim* to eouoMriri »urpla* trriuting »twrntfh acid and it> twoth* and orotK* Inflamed ilomacfi *.;rface«. If rou *';T*r iTmptnm» of atoraaeh ule*:i etused tit too * *-h «toina'ii acid or you from indige*'Jon. «»s. h-*r»ntjrn, du« to till« e*u«*- m is t«*i, »iwmid %rt V«*'* for prompt relief rtfht without rigid Itqutd dl* Get tpMlal SO* TRIAL SIZE parkane At wr *ru |f«t. WITH AMERICAN AIR FORCES IN CHINA. Sept. 27 (JPh~Resuming their air offensive against the Japanese after a lapse of nearly a month, the American air force in China strafed troop columns in southwest Yunnan Province yesterday and made another of their attacks on Hanoi in French Indochina the day before, Lieut. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell’s headquarters has announced. In connection with the raid Friday on Gai Lam airdrome at Hanoi, Brig, Gen. Claire Chennault, commander of American air forces in China, declared that French and natives of Indo-China were becoming less co-operative with the Japanese occupation forces as a result of United States air successes. The change of sentiment among the French is especially noticeable since the Americans demonstrated their ability to penetrate Japanese air defenses and carry out bqmbings of important bases without loss to themselves, he said. On the bombing mission Friday the Americans encountered a new Japanese two-motored, two-seater fighting plane, the 1-45. Three of the Japanese interceptors were shot down for certain, two others possibly were shot down and several others were damaged. No American plane was shot down. Only 15 of the Japanese planes were able to get into the air. The 1-45 was said to be heavily armed with a 20-millimeter cannon and two 13-millimeter guns forward and additional cannon operated by a rear gunner. Pilots said it was very fast and maneuverable, operated at a high ceiling and “compares very favorably with our fighters used here." PAPER SI SPENDS HARRISBURG. Sept. 27 (JP)—The Harrisburg Sunday Courier, founded in 1903, suspended publication for the duration with today's issue. A front-page box announced the action, saying ‘ the many present- day wartime conditions have caused the suspension.” The weekly newspaper was published by the Harrisburg Sunday Courier company. Leon Lowengara was publisher. PHONE 2696 Laval - Nazi Envoy Reported Meeting To Plot New Moves BERN, Switzerland, Sept. *27 <JP)— Having ousted Jacques Benoist- Mechin as secretary of state in the Vichy Foreign Ministry, Pierre | Laval was reported to be in Parts j today conferring with the German i envoy, Otto Abetz, on increasing the ! flow of French workers to Germany and further reorganization of his regime. The ouster of Benoist-Mechin j follow-ed a week of rumors of plots I against the Vichy chief of govern- j ment, Laval. Their nature was suggested, in 1 fact, by a declaration by Laval at j Vichy, in connection with the elim- ] ination of Benoist-Mechin. that: “I | shall under no circumstances allow ! the authority of the Government ' to be attacked.” Benoist-Mechin heads an inde- i pendent group of “young collabora- , tionists” pressing for a pro-German j program at a pace which Laval, still mindful of American prestige and power, apparently thought too rapid. The rumors of anti-Laval activity chiefly concerned Jacques Doriot, pro-Nazi Parts editor and the most outspoken collaborationist; Gen. Maxime Weygand and the escaped Gen. Henri Honoré Giraud. Both j these military men have been keep- | ing out of the political picture but i their sympathies could hardly be with Laval. Benoist-Mechin was not often mentioned and French political informants here said they were not certain if he had worked with Doriot, who most Frenchmen believe has little chance of entering the Laval Government at this time. The German News Agency DNB mentioned Weygand and Giraud in a denial that they had fled France to join the fighting French forces of Gen. Charles De Gaulle. Both are still in France. It is generally accepted that they disapprove of much that is now occurring in Fiance but believe that Willkie Begins Trip To China After Dinner at Kremlin MOSCOW, Sept. 27 ¡JP i—Dresried in the same double breasted blue suit, white shirt and bright blue tic in which he left a Kremlin dinner party early this morning, Wendell Willkie departed today by plane foi China. Later dispatches from Kuibyshev reported his safe arrival at that branch capital of the Soviet Union. He carried a cane from a tree of Tolstoy's old home, a gift presented him yesterday. The Kremlin dinner given bv Premier Joseph Stalin was one of the most intimate ever tendered a visiting Allied statesman, and was reported as not too serious with Stalin, Willkie, Foreign Commissar Molotov, U. S. Ambas.sador Admiral William H. Standley and British Ambassador Sir Archibald Clark Kerr in good spirits. The Soviet press printed in full Willkie’s statement yesterday advocating a second front, along with reviews of his stay in Russia and account« of the Kremlin dinner The Soviet press also printed interviews with him, the first American to receive such attention. wheel and they started away. Ste wart said he &»ked where they were going and they told him to his store, adding they “had been keeping an eye on him for several weeks.” Stewart related that he told the men he didn’t have the key to the safe and said it was at his assist- ill Tuseday night and his condition was reported improved the following day. He became suddenly worse Thursday night. Death was attributed to a heart condition and complications. Born in Italy, he came to the United States in 1900. After operating a shoe repair shop many years ant’s house, believing the men would he opened a shoe store, which he not dare go there; but that they i conducted 15 years. He opened the went with him to the assistant’s Casa Luna cafe. Bridge St., Phoenix- house and forced him to ask for ; ville in 1936, the key while they held a gun against his back. The holdup men then drove to the store in the fashionable Ritten- hoikse Square section, turned on all the lights, opened the safe and removed the contents. They left Stewart bound and gagged, he said, but He was a member of St. Ann's Catholic church and Phoenixville Kiwanis club. Surviving him are his wife, Lucy (Vescuso), and the following children; John Cutillo, Nancy, wife of Michael Irete; Dorothy, wife of Paul Reber; Mary, wife of Wilson Roshe managed to free himself after j siter, and Nicholas Cutillo, ali of j a time and report the robbery. ' Phoenixville. The bandits’ car. found in the j Also three brothers, Louis, An- drivewav at Stewart's home, was ; thony and Dominic Cutillo, Phoenix- said to have been stolen Saturday viile, and five sisters including Smart Men Will Be Buying These ZIPPER TOPCOATS For Many Seasons of Smart Wear S 21 50 Us« Our Lay-Away Plan C RANEO Factor? Branch Main & DeKalb Sts. Norristown in Chester. LONDON. Sept. 27 — Wendell L Willkie's forthright call for the opening of a second front to aid Russia produced prompt political repercussions in Britain today, witti demands being made upon the Churchill war cabinet for an authoritative answer without delay. Lord Strabolgi, the labor peer, in a Wimbledon speech, termed “highly significant.” the statement of Willkie, who is touring war froiv * for President Roosevelt, that the best way to aid Russia was to open a second front before next Summer and that some Allied generals might need prodding to bring it about." their best service can be to remain in the country until there is an opportunity of worthwhile action . Two Captured in Gun Battle With Policemen PITTSBURGH. Sept. 27 <4>s—Two men who police said were ex-convicts were captured after a drug store gun battle in which a rookie patrolman was shot Saturday night Cornelius K Walker, 32. and two other plain clothesmen werf* in a booth when the bandits entered with drawn guns. Walker attempted to pull his gun and was hit in the arm by a bullet fired by one of the bandits. Several other shots were exchange by the holdup men and Walker’s fellow officers but no one was hit. One of the bandits was ! trapped in the prescription room of | the drug store and surrendered, and the other who backed from the j store by using the proprietor as a i shield wras captured near the scene i within an hour. Julia, wife of Geoffrey Golie, Roy- 1 1 ersford, and Rose, wife of John Coccio. Three other sisters reside in I Italy. j| Twin Boro Classified Strayed, Lost, Found 10 LOST -Gold-filled tie chain, with vel- | « low gold key Inscribed with emblem 1 of S.C H S., class of ’40 and blue 11 onyx atone, reward. 346 Broad at., *' Spring City. Phone 385-R SPECIAL OFFER TO READERS Help Wanted—Male S3 MEN WANTED Apply at Once. Kraaley Bleach and Dye Works. Wanted to Buy Furniture, carpets and stoves bought, sold and exchanged J. Siegel's Sons. Ph Phoenixville 3535. 126 Bridge st. Unfurnished Apartments 68 Apartment for rent. 3 rooms, all convenience«, 417 Walnut st., Royersford STOP! Eye-Strain Why Not Get Rid of Your 1 russ and RUPTURE for otfr 40 year» i have been located in Reading, and have treated many hundred people foi rupture I will relieve you without pain or danger ol inconvenience of • surgical operation, but it you prefer to continue wearing a trus». I will guarantee to tit vou perfectly Ask me for names of your neighbors I have cured Consultation and examination free Office hours: Friday Saturday and Sunday by appointment Call write or phone me. .......... H MELVIN ALLEN M O.. 204# Falrvlew Avenue. Reading. Pa ............ This coupon with only 13c in cash, entitles holder lo any Culinary Arts Institute Cookbooklet. which has been released. The complete set consists of 20 booklets all of which may now be obtained at your neighborhood grocer, COOKBOOKLETS Nos. 1 to 20 NOW ON SALE Visit Your Neighborhood Grocer What* When and where was the first veterinary school established? ANSWER: You’ll find the answer in the picture above. f Where can you find a handy list of the veterinarians in your vicinity? ANSWER: You’ll find the local VETERINARIANS— as well as the LUMBER DEALERS, CHIROPODISTS, DRUGGISTS, MOVERS and many other services—conveniently listed in the Yellow Pages of your telephone directory. You'll save time these busy days if you look in the Yellow Pages when you want to know “who sells it” or who will do the job. 1/biM frCnti ifin "tkt 'feuow PAGBSi THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA lr ' Have Your Eyes Examined the Modern Way, Without Drugs. Always Go to a Specialist! Optometrist 7 N. Hanover St. OfTtt'e Hour»: 9 in 5, No Hours Thurs. EVES., Wed. and Sat. 33 YEARS IN POTTSTOWN LOANS ÏP300 GIRARD INVESTMENT CO. 268 HIGH ST. —Telephone 1726 Dr. Meyers GOOD FURNITURE AT LOW COST ALWAYS AT GOLDBERG’S 135 HIGH STREET POTTSTOWN, PA. AN APOLOGY To Those Who Were Missed During the Scrap Collection in Royersford on Saturday, Due to the Tremendous Response it Was Impossible to Cover the Assigned Territory on Saturday. Additional Trucks Will Be Used Saturday, October 3, in the Second and Fourth Wards. SALVAGE COMMITTEE OF ROYERSFORD

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 19,500+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free