Daily News from New York, New York on November 9, 1982 · 5
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Daily News from New York, New York · 5

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New York, New York
Issue Date:
Tuesday, November 9, 1982
Page:
5
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PairSoiier feM to By OWEN MORITZ Daily News building A limited partnership of New York News Inc. and Chicago's LaSalle Street Fund Inc. has been formed to buy the landmark Daily News building at 220 E. 42dSt Tribune Company, owners of the Daily News, announced yesterday in Chicago that The News will "retain a significant ownership interest in the building as a limited partner." The News editorial and business offices will continue to use the building as their headquarters. WPIX-TV and other Tribune Company affiliates also will continue to occupy a significant part of the building. More than half the building already is leased to outside tenants. Formation of the 220 East Limited Partnership is in keeping with recent News moves to improve the paper's operations while shifting its printing and production operations to Brooklyn and satellite printing plants in Nassau County and New Jersey. The vacated production space is being converted to office use. THE GENERAL PARTNER is LaSalle Street Fund Inc., a private real estate investment fund owned by a group of major corporate pension trusts and sponsored by LaSalle Partners Inc. of Chicago. The sale is subject to Tribune Company stockholder approval. No sale price was announced for the building, owned solely by New York News Inc. Tribune Company officials said: "The planned transaction is part of a continuing Tribune Company program to make maximum use of its assets in its primary communications businesses, rather than in realestate." The company has interests in publishing, newsprint and other forest products, broadcasting, cable television, baseball and other activities. The 37-story News Building was completed in 1930, and an 18-story annex was added in 1960. It is considered one of New York's major examples of Art Deco architecture and is an official New York City landmark. The building has 1.1 million square feet of space. POM' V mk J4 JACK SMITH DAILY NEWS Chief of Operations Patrick Murphy (right) talks to press about condition of detective Nat Musso (above), who as shot in the face. nn r iVh I ! t - - ' ' ft 1 I . i I ' Jr- i By RICHARD ROSEN With Murray Weiss and Larry Sutton A detective was shot in the face and seriously wounded by a stickupman yesterday when he and two other detectives interrupted a robbery in a Harlem apartment believed to be a "shooting gallery" for drug addicts, police said. Two stickupmen identified as Carlos Ortiz, 30, of W. 59th St., Manhattan, and Robert Moore, 29, of Jersey City were arrested last night and charged with attempted murder of a police officerTen other people inside the apartment were taken to the Eighth Ave. station for questioning, and police said they expected more arrests. The wounded detective, Nat Musso, 54, a police officer for 29 years, was hit in the right cheek, and the bullet exited near the left side of his nose. Police said the shot was fired through the door of a fourth-floor apartment at 85 W. 118th St. about 3:25 p.m., after Musso and his two plainclothes partners, John Croston and Rolf Rhebein, knocked and identi- fied themselves as officers. The detectives went to the address after an unidentified man and a woman stooped the officers' unmarked car at Lenox Ave. and 116th St. and told them a robbery was in progress at the apartment, police said. AFTER MUSSO WAS HIT, Croston fired twice into the door and Rhebein got off one shot, police said. No one in the apartment was hit. Croston and Rhebein then rushed into the apartment, and the two stickupmen and 10 others surrendered. Inside, detectives found a handgun that may have been used to shoot Musso, police said. Drug paraphernalia and substances believed to be narcotics were also found in the apartment, which is in an abandoned building. Chief of Operations Patrick Murphy said the apartment apparently was used for drug transactions and by addicts for shooting up narcotics. Musso was reported in stable condition at St. Luke's Hospital. "He's talking, he's coherent and he doesn't appear dazed," Murphy said. )DD dd if By ARTHUR BROWNE Third of a series N MAY 6, 1981, Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Glass opened the trial of 0 1 Emilio Ortiz, a Queens teenager charged with murder in connection with a gang-fight killing, it seemed a simple case at tirst, Dut complex issues kept arising. And by the time it ended with a hung jury the trial had stretched on for more than 11 weeks. Ortiz was quickly scheduled for a retrial, and the case was shifted to Acting Supreme Court Justice Nicholas Tsoucalas. How long did it take Tsoucalas to get through the trial? Just two weeks from opening remarks to Ortiz' conviction for manslaughter. No surprise there. Tsoucalas is one of the fastest-working, most productive judges in the city one of a handful whose work is living demonstration of speedy justice. These judges are the heroes of the court system, producing as' much as twice the work of the average judge and four times the work of the slowest. . . Hat? f.ioTierj JoggH rl LVui BILL TURNBULL DAILY NEWS Three of the more productive judges in the system are (from I.) Nicholas Tsoucalas, Sybil Kooper and John Leahy. Their heroics are amply documented in the secret productivity records made public for the first time in this series by the Daily News just as the records helped identify the least productive judges. But observation of these judges at work and interviews with lawyers and other judges also reveal that they are among the most respected on the bench for their fairness, hard work and legal Let's take a look at who they are: Nicholas Tsoucalas: This judge is actually a Criminal Court judge and was returned to that lower court this year under Chief Judge Lawrence Cooke's judicial rotation plan.' 0 ability. m&-w&.M&v4-M See SLOW MOTION JUSTICE Page 18

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