Calgary Herald from Calgary, Alberta, Canada on August 9, 1995 · 34
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

Calgary Herald from Calgary, Alberta, Canada · 34

Publication:
Location:
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Issue Date:
Wednesday, August 9, 1995
Page:
34
Start Free Trial
Cancel

D2 CALGARY HERALD Wednesday, August 9, 1995 SPORTS PROFILE Moore has savvy to know when to shift gears Fast Facts Auto racer Greg Moore Born: April 22, 1975. Resides: Maple Ridge, B.C. Career highlights: 1995 Clinched PPG-Firestone IndyLights championship, with eight wins (one second) in nine races. Set IndyLights record by winning first five races of season. 1994 Third in PPG-Firestone IndyLights championship season,' with three victories and two pole positions. Also youngest competitor. 1993 Ninth in PPG-Firestone IndyLights championship season, including eight top-10 finishes. 1992 Won USAC Formula 2000 West title in rookie year, with four wins and four poles and was racing team began to hear the financial gears grinding. "We'd been struggling a bit," Moore conceded. His mentor, manager, "and best friend" Greg's dad, Ric had been sponsoring Moore's efforts via the family Chrysler dealership in Maple Ridge, B.C. "We were wondering where the money was going to come from. The costs seem to go up, multiplied by the square root, every time." After strong showings in Formula 1600 and 2000 in the early '90s, Team Moore had put out $1 million-plus to get the kid established. "There's the initial expense of buying the car, not to mention an 18-wheel truck and trailer ($650,000-$700,000). Then another $300,000 or so last year," Moore said. Once again, his father an ex-driver who got his son hooked on 70-mile-an-hour go-karts before the kid was 10 got down to cases. "I think my dad nagged (Player's) into the deal," Moore laughed. Meanwhile, his new overlords invited Moore Sr. to remain as Greg's manager, and also welcomed chief engineer Steve Challis a friend and family confidant for more than a decade. "He's the mad scientist behind make. Still, he's in no mood to complain. "I'm an employee of the company now. Obviously, they don't want to hurt somebody's career by jumping in too soon," said Moore, in town to stir interest in the Vancouver Indy on Labor Day weekend. "I'm 20," he shrugged. "I've got the time." He's got the jelly, too. Moore's first campaign under Player's protective wing has rapidly evolved into an implausible dream. After nailing eight of his first nine races, Moore currently, he's 78 points ahead of second-place Robbie Buhl has clinched the 1995 IndyLights championship. One more Moore victory ties the all-time circuit record, established by fellow Canadian Paul Tracy in 1990. "It is like a dream," smiled Moore. With a cool, personal style similar to Indy 500 winner Jacques Vil-leneuve of Quebec, Moore helps subdue the stereotype of the mad-eyed, death-snubbing racer. He looked more like a summer intern at Wood Gundy, as he explained his transformation into one of the monsters of racing. "One, this is my third year," he began. "I know the tracks, and the I know, deep down, I can drive the IndyCars 99 IndyLights driver Greg Moore cars. Two, I've got a great relationship with the guys in my crew. "Most important, signing with Forsythe and Player's has given us the resources we need," he said. Because at this level of racing, dollars burn hotter than fuel. "It allows you, for example, to do 25-30 days of winter tests," explained Moore. "Last year, I think we were only able to do 14." And last winter, too, the Moore WORLD TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS gM& wmmm mm - - - -7 (,..1 ' i)TDK It's the obvious question, and, fromTrois Rivieres, Que., to Port Co-quitlam, B.C., it's asked of him ad nauseum: How soon will Canadian IndyLights sensation Greg Moore get to race TOM KEYSER Herald columnist with the big kids? Moore's response jars people who think he's ready now: Not next year. Maybe not the year after that, either. "I know, deep down, I can drive the (heavier, hotter) IndyCars," said the precocious British Columbian, who's turning the 1995 IndyLights tour into a tour-de-force his third time around. Almost impossibly self-assured at age 20, Moore was the youngest driver ever to crack this circuit just shy of his 18th birthday, in 1993. And, he calmly added, he has nothing left to learn from racing IndyLights one more year. But since he signed career-saving deals this year with Forsythe Racing, and new sponsor Player's, such calls are no longer Moore's to NBA League, players reach deal Now players will vote to accept or decertify union Associated Press NEW YORK The National Basketball Association and its players union reached agreement on a labor deal Tuesday night, but it must still be ratified by a divided union membership. In announcing the deal, commissioner David Stern said passage would allow the 1995- season to start on time. The proposal eliminates the luxury tax, a sticking point with players in an earlier agreement, and includes a $1-million exception for teams over the salary cap to sign T " free agents. "We're very . happy the NBA met our con-W " 1 cerns," Buck f ' Williams, presi- f , dent of the union, said during a news conference. "We feel very fortunate that we could work out an agreement at five minutes, 10 minutes before midnight." A lockout has . r been in effect since July 1. The talks were a last effort to get a new deal before the union relinquished its authority as the players' bargaining agent, a step union leadership said it would take by midnight unless there was an agreement. Twenty-five players attended the meeting at a midtown hotel, including Utah's John Stockton, Phoenix's Danny Manning, Dallas's Jimmy Jackson and Cleveland's Mark Price. About 90 minutes after the players went behind closed doors, NBA officials came to the hotel, and Stern arrived a short time later. The vote on the new deal will be held along with a previously scheduled vote on decertification of the union. Players will either vote for the deal or for dissolving the union, union executive director Simon Gourdine said. "We know there's still a lot of work to be done and there are players who want to know what the deal is," Gourdine said. OLYMPIC QUALIFYING Rain plagues baseball playoff EDMONTON (CP) There are rain delays and then there are rain delays. For the second straight day, rain washed out competition at the Americas Baseball Challenge in Edmonton, leaving teams pacing hotel hallways on Tuesday and organizers praying for a break in the weather. "We're getting antsy here," said Canadian manager Jim Baba, whose team enjoyed some momentum after winning its first two games at the Olympic qualifying event. "I've never experienced anything like this." Games rained out Monday were scheduled for Thursday, while Tuesday's rain-outs have been set for Friday Canada was to have played Cuba on Monday in a matchup of the best two teams at the six-nation tournament. The four other teams at the tournament are Aruba, Bahamas, Nicaragua and Brazil. The top two teams will secure berths at next summer's Olympic baseball competition in Atlanta. l : the operation," kidded Moore. "He sets the car up, decides what the suspension setting will be, the tire pressure, v "Funny, Steve used to run a fix-it shop in North Vancouver, he called it Gasoline Alley," Moore said. "Now, in a couple of years, he'll be working at the real Gasoline Alley when we race at the Indy 500." SPORTS IN BRIEF Leader aces No. 3: Canadian Press SAINT JOHN, N.B. Matthew Ion of Ancaster, Ont., had a hole-in-one and finished his first round with a 70 to grab the lead at the Canadian junior golf championship Tuesday Ion aced the par-3, 204-yard 10th, rated as the toughest hole on the par-72, 6,344-yard Riverside Country Club course. Two strokes back are Steve Swonnell of Victoria, David Anthony of Cambridge, Ont., and Jesse Collinson of Pickering, Ont. Calgary's James Muir and Patrick Loftus, both of the Glen-coe, and Chris Bruggencate, of the Calgary club, shot 77s. Langer withdraws Associated Press LOS ANGELES Two-time Masters champion Bern-hard Langer of Germany withdrew from the PGA Championship on Tuesday, citing back problems. Langer, leading money-winner on the European Tour this year, joins David Gilford of England as likely members of the European team in next month's Ryder Cup to pull out of the PGA because of a back injury Another key member of the European Ryder Cup team, Spain's Seve Ballesteros, has also been playing with a bad back, but is still scheduled to play when the PGA starts Thursday at Riviera Country Club. The Ryder Cup will be played Sept. 22-24. i Sampras survives : Asscoiated Press MASON, OHIO Extended to a second-set tiebreaker, second-ranked Pete Sampras rediscoy-ered his overpowering serve to beat Petr Korda in the second round of the $1.8 million ATP Championship on Tuesday night. "I got off to a good start, even though I didn't think I was hitting the ball that well," Sampras said of his 6-3, 7-6 (7-3) win. "Once I let him back into the match, he played well." In the other evening match, 11th-seeded Jim Courier beat Vince Spadea 7-5, 7-6 (9-7). Earlier, Sandon Stolle of Australia beat Stefan Edberg of Sweden 6-3, 6-1 in a first-round match, j Hockey coups Canadian Press VANCOUVER Two key international hockey tournaments have been awarded to Vancouver next year, the Canadian Hockey Association announced Tuesday The Pacific women's hockey championship, featuring three of the top four seeded countries in the world, will take place March 31-April 6, while the Pacific Cup, an under-18 men's tournament, will be played in late August. Jets may face cap Canadian Press WINNIPEG Spirit of Manitoba Inc. says it might impose its own salary cap in an effort to keep pro hockey alive in Winnipeg. For hockey fans, that could mean a team with fewer super stars until the Jets' financial situation stabilizes, the National Hockey League expands and learns how to control its own costs. "A business plan lays out the realities that you absolutely have to deal with if you want to survive," Spirit; president Cam Osier said Tuesday. "In' Winnipeg that means controlling and managing salaries." - ' '"'VV 'til u Lynne Sladky, Associated Press MOMENT TO REMEMBER- Canada's Michael Smith, who trains in Calgary, earned the decathlon bronze medal Monday, but had to wait until Tuesday for the medal presentations. Gebrselassie prevails in 10,000 metres; Canadians on limp GOTEBORG, Sweden (AP) Like a little rabbit hiding in the bushes, Haile Gebrselassie hopped out at the last moment and outran his bigger opponents. The Ethiopian blasted out of a five-man pack with 200 metres remaining and sped to victory in the 10,000 metres in meet-record time Tuesday at the world championships. In winning the gold medal for the second consecutive time, Gebrselassie was timed in 27 minutes, 12.95 seconds, the fastest ever at the world championships or the Olympics. "Two hundred metres to go, I felt I would win," he said. Although it was not as fast as Ge-brselassie's world record of 26:43.53, the race was not expected to be particularly fast because the runners had to compete earlier in the meet in semifinals and the pace in a championship race is generally not as fast as during an invitational meet. With 200 metres to go, five runners were in contention before Gebrselassie, who sat in second place for most of the second half of the race, burst to the front and outkicked the others. Skah Hissour of Morocco finished second in 27:14.53 and Paul Tergat of Kenya was third in 27:14.70, a career-best. Meanwhile, the Canadian team has lost two of its top athletes to injuries. Rosey Edeh of LaSalle, Que., did not start the first round of the 400-metre Edmonton group EDMONTON (CP) A group of Edmonton businessmen wants to bring the world track and field championships to the city in 2001. Commonwealth Stadium would be the main venue for the event, said Bob Steadward, who is leading the group. NFL U Diether Endlicher, Associated Press VICTORY LAP- Ethiopia's Haile Gebrselassie celebrates after he burst into the lead with 200 metres remaining to win the men's 10,000 metres Tuesday . crossing the finish line British spokesman Tony Ward said Tuesday that Christie had flown to Zurich for further tests on his leg and would definitely miss the 200-metre competition, which starts Thursday. While Gebrselassie was successfully defending his title, two other 1993 winners high jumper Javier Sotomayor of Cuba and women's 400-metre runner Jearl Miles of the U.S. were beaten. Sotomayor, also the Olympic gold medallist and world record-holder, finished second in the men's high jump to Troy Kemp of the Bahamas. Both cleared 2.37 metres, but Sotomayor had more misses earlier and Kemp became the first athlete from his country to win a gold medal in the championships. Miles wound up third, behind Maria-Jose Perec of France, the 1991 champion who regained her title in 49.28, the fastest in the world this year. Pauline Davis of the Bahamas was second. championships den, where the 1995 championships are being held. Once there, he plans to meet with International Olympic Committee president Juan Antonio Samaranch and track officials to discuss the bidding procedure. I Complete list of winners D3 hurdles Tuesday due to a hamstring injury sustained last week in training. Graham Hood of Burlington, Ont, had already withdrawn from the 800-metres, and now has been scratched from the 1,500. Canadians in competition today include Angela Chalmers of Victoria in the final of the women's 1,500-metres. Graeme Fell of Vancouver will run in the semifinals of the 3,000-metre steeplechase. Also on the limp is Olympic 100-metre champion Linford Christie of Britain who will not compete in the men's 200 metres and is very doubtful for the 400-metre relay, a British team official said. Christie suffered a hamstring injury in Sunday's 100-metre semifinal, but decided to run in the final. He wound up sixth in 10.12 seconds, collapsing after to bid for world "We have the track. It would just be a matter of upgrading the track and developing some other facilities in the city for training," he said. Steadward is president of the International Paralympic Committee. He leaves today for Goteborg, Swe the last two seasons surfaced again in training camp. He missed an extra point and a 29-yard field goal in an exhibition game Saturday against Kansas City. "I had as much patience as I could," Redskins coach Norv Turner said. "I thought this year he'd come out and be able to get things straightened out." As Lohmiller drove off, into camp came 16-year veteran Murray, another Canuck Murray gets another kick at job By The Associated Press FROSTBURG, MD. The merry-go-round of National Football League kickers made another stop Tuesday. Chip Lohmiller was pushed off, and Canadian Eddie Murray hopped on. Lohmiller, an eight-veteran and former Pro Bowl selection, was waived by the Washington Redskins who were concerned when his erratic form of former Pro Bowl kicker who two weeks ago found himself on the sidelines when the Philadelphia Eagles released him in favor of Gary Anderson, formerly of the Pittsburh Steelers. "This is a crazy league," said Murray, joining his sixth team in five seasons. "It's a job, and that's really the bottom line." Murray, 38, who is from Victoria, spent his first 12 seasons with Detroit, then bounced from Kansas City to Tampa Bay to Dallas where he helped the Cowboys win a Super Bowl with Turner as offensive co-ordinator to Philadelphia. Last year, he was 21-for-25 in field goals and perfect on 33 extra points. He says he will have no trouble adjusting. "It's something you got to get used to quickly if you want to continue to play," Murray said. "I still enjoy playing." I

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 12,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the Calgary Herald
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free