The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on March 11, 1952 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Tuesday, March 11, 1952
Page:
Page 3
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TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1952 Texan Brands Taft 'Chameleon Solon' In Political Battle Reds' Lawyers ^Resume Attack BLYTHEVITXE (ARK.) COURIER NEW3 Undercover Agent's Testimony Target Of Examinations I.OS ANGELES </P> — Dc-fcnse lawyers resume their attack today on the testimony of undercover agent Daniel Scarletto. who told the FBI about the movements of six of the 15 California Communists now charged with conspiring apilnst the government. Cross-cxamiuation "of ScarMfo, fourth government witness, devel- or>pd a broad^iliiET nicture of the Communist parly's fears in recent years. Scnrletto said that the Marxist Institute School, which he. nl(i>nrtnd In 19« anrt 1!)50. was discontinued, for security reasons, then later rearmed at another location. The vonntr undercover man said he worked at the Lockheed aircraft plant at the time, but later was 1?W off. Asked If he had been r>d- ^vlsed by oariv members to t[Uit. Scarletto reolied: "I was told there was no nefd for sabotage while there was no war 'goinf; on." The answer was stricken on defense objection. The World War II airman earlier testified that he had renortcd lo the FBI from the moment he Joined the narty | n July, 1947. un m he onlt last week. The California Communists are charged with conspiracy to teach nnd advocate overthrow of the government by force. 'Lett-Footed Raffles' Winds Up All Wet in Attempt at Burglary PEORIA, III. W>j_Thinss Just didn't go right for the burglar who smashed a window to gain entry to the Rossettcr Motor Company. Police investigated yesterday nnd said evidence Indicated the . burglar crawled through a wln- •) dow and stepped into' a pan -of crankcase oil, then slipped and fell into the pan and set off a fire extinguisher which, presumably sprayed him with foam. No money was missing. By' MARVIN I,. AKRO\VSMrTII WASHINGTON (yj>j — Enlivening the political war of words. Sen. Taft of Ohio and Sen. Ccmnally of Texas traded sharp verbal volleys yesterday from a shooting distance of about 1,200 miles. Taft, a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, fired first from Houston, in Connally's home state. In a campaign speech, the Ohioan ripped the administration's handling of foreign policy and said Connally had declared a month before the Korean War started lhat "we wouldn't do anything about it if (he Communists moved into South Korea." Connolly, a Democrat running for re-election to the Senate, promptly let flv with an answering barrage from the Senate floor. Taft said lie had no comment on oonnally's reply Tan Called "Chameleon" The (nil Texan accused Taft of being a "chameleon senator" willing to "subordinate his integrity and his truthfulness in order to grasp a few slimy, filthy voles." Connally. shouting angrily and waving Iris arms, said Tail had charged that (he Tniman administration "invited the Communists into Korea," with "an assist" from Connally as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Connally's blast kept hi' Senate coJlengues late for dinner by touching off a lengthy and stormy debate. Democrats came to his defense and Republicans lit Into him. In Houston. Taft's mention of Connally's name brought scattered boos. "Tnken at Their Word" Tiie Ohioan said the Communists had taken Connally and Secretary of state Acheson "at, their word and moved in" to South Korea. He said both Connally and Achesori h:ul declared in advance (hat the United States woviid let them. Connally said Taft was "cravenly Koing around begging a few dirty filthy votes." That brought Sen. Hickenlooper iR-I_al to his feet demanding that Connally be seated nntier Senate rules prohibiting a member from impugning the honor of another senator. Sen. Lyndon Johnson (D-Texl moved that his colleague be permitted to "proceed in order" and the Senate gave Connally a go- ahead by voice vote. Returning to the attack, Connally called Taft a man "who speaks with the month ... of the demagogue" Before Connally had finished, other Democratic senators intcrnipted to praise him as champion of measures designed to thwart communism. PAGE THREE popularity. Japanese crowded the theaters to watch well-endowed local girls go through the motions-but they wutclied with solemn, caM-lron expressions. There were no whistles, no applause, and* never a cry of "TuU> il off!" The Japanese girls uorkcd hard to try to master the alien art form, but apparently were relieved when the more congenial swords-woman's dramas came aton^. Read Courier News Classified Ads Tunisia Feels Violence Again TUNIS, Tunisia t,i>i — Several new outbreaks of violence, attributed to independence-seeking Tunisian nationalists, brouKlit death to one man, injury to three others and scattered damage last night. A bomb explosion at the back end of a Tunis police post resulted in the death and injuries. Explosives blew up a water main supply- Ing Bizorte. Sousse station was damaged by na explosion. Several bottles o[ flaming gasoline were Ihmi at, Tunis streetcars. GOT A COLD JAKE symptomatic RELIEF Japanese Strip- Seems to Be on B> FRED SAITO TOKYO m — The strip-tease .show, one of America's unintentional contributions to Japanese theatrics seems to be on its last legs in Tokyo. It decline is being hastened by the sudden emergence of a new all-Japane.se style of entertainment called a "swordswoman's drama." The sworciswonian dramas, like western movies, all have essentially the same plot. A frail heroine, bullied and beset by cruel men. becomes an Amazon in the last act. Snatching up a Samurai sword. Japants traditional heavy-slashing weapon, she mows down her tormentors like hay. Japanese men and women, under WHEREABOUTS UNKNOWN- OKLAHOMA CITY «•) —L. H. Bcngston, a staunch A&M alumnus, has been faithfully attending Aggie home football games this year. And his companions have been A. O. Martin and Thurman Qay, heads of the Aggies, Former Students Association. Tease Show Last Legs a foreign occupation for the first time in the country's hlstcry. apparently get a symbolic thrill from the dramatic ending. SMnril is A Symbol The Samurai sword itself powerful Japanese symbol. I.OCO years it was considered soul of the Samurai" — the revered warrior class-and even today a display of swords will draw a crowd. At any rale, at a time when Ja- Is a For 'the inn's biggest, amusement company h":cl cl.scd its No. 1 strn-tc-::e l-.nuse near occupation headquarters. Miti, ..a Cye. a leading "swoi uswoin- :)"," has won the top suot in an all-Japan stage popularity poll. The ; poll was conducted by Daily Sparks. Hie Japanese equivalent of Variety, [and there wasn't a single stripper on the list. Sex U'as Popular The earlier popularity of the strip show was one of Japan's posl [ war phenomena. The Japanese usually handle sex on the stage in a rather restrained way. lint in the rush to ape anything American, the strip tease attained a certain Read Courier News Classified Ads Immigrant Cleared of Virus'Carrying' OTTAWA IJ>i THcr \,1 I~ n.;l .... .... ^ OTTAWA (/T/—Big, blonde Willi Bruentjen, an immigrant German farmhand, flies back to Vancouver tonight with S50 in his pocket and the happy knowledge that he didn't bring Canada's current outbreak of foot and mouth disease- from a German farm. He was cleared last night of suspicion he might be the inno- cenb carrier of the cattle disease after ll days of federal laboratory tests. He was paid S50 for time spent at the'Iaboralory. Authorities feared that he might have brought the virus on his clothes from a larm In Germany where he worked and where it broke out before his departure. 3-DAY SPECIAL SUPPLY LIMITED CITY REBUILT SINGER PORTABLE ELECTRIC SEWING MACHINE l by . City E>pt,li wild City Pdit» •.NEW MOTOR »H£W SEW LIGHT •NEW CARRYING CASE »NEW S-SPEED FOOT CONTROL MAIL This.Coupon Today I I I I I MM 31 696 Madison Street Memphis, Term. 1 would like a tree home demonstration ot your lully guaranteed rebuilt Singer Sewinj Machine at no obligation to me. Name , , , , _ - - . Cily .Stile. H ». T, D. AddrtM—PIMM Stna SpeeJMe Dirtettaw —-™ ^^^^^^^^^*m Anhydrous Ammonia Fertilizer Distributor Designed for all popular models and makes of tnictors... (lie .John lihic ferlili/er equipment is (he economical machine lo use. H is safe, accurate and simple lo operate gives absolute quantity regulation of anhydrous ammonia. 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