The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on March 6, 1952 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, March 6, 1952
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Page 7
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THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1952 itical Races Shaping Up in New Hampshire Each Contest Between Man Working for Job, One WHo Hasn't Said By The Associated Press Political oratory echoed across New Hampshire's snow - covered hills today In hand-shaking, meet the prople, answer the questions campaigns. The Republican and Democratic races each appeared to be a contost between a man working hard for the presidency and one who hasn't eaici he wants the job. The Republican choice seemed narrowed to Sen. Robert A. Taft who arrives In New Hampshire today in earnest quest of the nomination, and Gen. Dwijrht D. Elsen- hower, who says he won't seek It but will accept if nominated. On the Democratic side, Sen. Estes Kefauver of Tennessee was licrhtinii what he calls an uphill battle against supporters of President. Truman. The President has not. announced whether he wants another term. The results of the New Hampshire primary election nr-xt Tues- dnv are not binding on convention delegates. But since it is the first presidential primary of the year, great psychological value is attached to its outcome. The latest happenings in the national campaign: Democratic: 1. Rep. Bryson (D-SC) v!slt.ed Truman yesterday and said the President told him he would know what to do about running "If he were sure Taft would not set the Republican nomination ami would not get elected it he got It." Sen. Bre\vst«r <R-Me), a Taft backer, called this statement "an obvious attempt" by the President to influence the New Hampshire primary. "I say it's time to call his bluff," Bre'«ter added. "Let him run again . . . Let him go out and defend the record as a candiate." 2. Democratic National Committee officials said they are leaving It to stale leaders whether to enter Truman's name in their presidential primaries. But to avoid any embarrassments, they are discouraging entry of the President's name in contests where his consent is required. 3. Kefauver conducted a slow- motion typ« at campaign in New Hampshire, selling himself in a folksy sort, of way. Truman backers expressed confidence the President would get all eight Democratic delegates. Kefauver none. Republican: 1. Paul G. Hoffman, former economic cooperation administrator, told a Durham, N. K., audience that Eisenhower is the only GOP candidate "who can win ths independent vote and break the single 'Solid South.' " 2. Taft, attain protesting the alphabetical listing which places him last on the ballot, opens his three- day drive nt Manchester. He has 21 appearances scheduled. 3. The New Jersey Taft-for-Pfcs- Ident Committee announced tMe Ohloan will be entered in the state's preferential primary April Senators to Investigate Security-Loyalty Plan BLYTHEVIU-E (AUK.) COURIER NEWS WASHINGTON (AP) _ Without *• eccn waiting to decide which committee will conduct it. senators mapped plans today (or a full-scale investigation of the State Department's loyalty-security program. Sen. McCarran <D-Xcv) and Sen. Ferguson <R-Mlch> said secretary of State Achesoii irill testify under oath at the inquiry. The only question was whether the investigation will be made by the Senate internal security subcommittee or the appropriations subcommittee handling Slate Department funds. McCarran is chairman of both groups and Ferguson is a member of both. Demands b)' MeCarran and Ferguson for the inquiry followed Acheson's announcement that he had reversed the findings or the department's Loyalty-Security Board in the case of career diplomat Oliver Edmund Clubb. The board found clubta was a security risk, although there was no adverse finding as to his loyalty. Acheson's action allowed Clubb to retire on pension. Cold Weather Delays Paying Odd Court Fine Schoolboy Held For Killing of Pretty Girl SMITHTOWN. N. Y. W) A 13- year-o!d boy was held In Jail today, accused of killing a pretty classmate when she resisted his advances as they walked together. Harold Lorentson, an honor student, was charged with first gree murder last night. de- Suffolk County Dist. Atty. Linsay R. Henry said the boy admitted In a signed statement that he killed 12-year-old Lydo Kitchner, who had sat next to him in a seventh grade class. The brown-eyed girl's bruised body, the clothes in disarray, was found In a bong Island wooded area last Nov. 20. she had been strangled with her own scarf. Police questioned scores of her schoolmates. Adenauer Wants U.S. of Europe BONN. Germany M>) — Chancellor Konrart Adenauer says West Germany will Join with any nation that takes the initiative in drafting a constitution for a united states of Europe. "A united Europe would be necessary even if there were no Soviet danger." Adenauer said in a radio interxiew, because "no single European country can have the necessary livins standard just from her own strength." Salt water bathers often have to retreat from the water because of the stinging nettle, a species of jellyfish, which shoots microscopic stringers Into bathers. 15. 4. Gov. Earl Warren of California said he will enter Oregon's May 16 Republican primary. FOR COUNTRY RETREATS OR CITY STREETS... •su- the DOBBS Living right up lo its name, the; Dobhs Rainbow is as lively as spring itself. Il's just what you need for casual, carefree comfort... and right in every detail. The colorful band blends with the color of the body ... and there's a genuine trout fly hooked into the bow. 12 50 R. D.HUGHES CO, CHICAGO W>-Cold weather yes .erday delayed a fur-coated subur ban matron from paying her traffic ine by standing at an intersection ilid counting passing automobiles Mrs. Evelyn Mancou. an of Hi"h land Park, had agreed to make the Taffic survey in lieu of a $10 fine for sneerting. She said she'd rather BO to jail than pay the fine, insist mg she was innocent. Police Chief Walter Yackel of suburban Kcnilworth decided it was too cold and postponed the survey until Monday. Cominform Unit To Be Set Up In Lebanon BEIRUT w, _ R,,mors that a| Cominform bureau may be est.ib lishcd In Beirut have appeared In the Lebanese press. The story, which originated In the TiirtL=h daily Jumhuriet is tak en seriously here because of mans already existing evidences of well- organized leftwing activity in Le banon. According to the Jumhuriet stors Beirut is slated to become Com inform headquarters for the Arab world. Branch centers would be organized In Cairo, Ismailia, Alexandria, Damascus and other strategic cities. PAGE Imported Toys to Play Important Role Here NEW YORK (AP) — American hildren and many of their parents nay be playing with more import- •rt toys this year than ever belorc. ThU is Indicated by demand for pace at the second International Toy Exhibit, which opens lx>re Monday, March 10. Space for the show this year Is twice what it vas for the initial show last year vhen demand exceeded the available area by 100 per cent—an offi- •ial said. Gottfried Neiiburger, arranger 'or the displays, said there will be i total of 26 displays this year 'rom 12 countries. Many of the Individual displays will show toys made by scores o[ manufacturers. Toys this ycnr will show » wide ange In children's wonderland, as hundreds of Ingenious makers vie or jwpularlty—and sales. Prom Japan will come, among others, mechanical animals, Inducing birds wllh feathered wings which fly and sound their calls. France, also, will offer birds life- ike feathered birds In cages which slug for as long as 10 minutes. German toys will place emphasis on Ihc military. There will be a variety of tanks and trucks, along with trick mechanical trains, magnetically steered automobiles, and LATEST THING IN KOREAN PLUMBINO-U isn't a plush chrome job. but it's adequate, ami men serving with the Far East Air force 6127th Air Terminal Croup in Korea are glad ingenious members of the group contrived this shower bath. Top to bottom: Pvl Roncr Schncfor. of Washington. D. C., T/Sgt. Tony Cc-scro, of Boston, Mass.: nnd Set- William Sweeney, of Pittsburgh, Pa., try out the contraption. A! last-a famous premium quality Sour Mash Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is $f 56 available at a popular price. I KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON MADE BY THE DISTILIERS OF FAMOUS KENTUCKY TAVERN* K1NIUCXT i7B*IGKT ftOlf'ION WM[$t(Y • IO Ttl EB -!»• (O MD • 100 PROOF GlENMOKE DIS1ILIERIES COMPANY • IOUISVIUE, Kt. FOR Ammonium Nitrate 20 1 / 2 Per Cent For Information and Price, Call WEST MEMPHIS COTTON OIL MILL WEST MEMPHIS, ARK. Phone West Mempnis, 81 Phon6 Memphls> 5 .., 040 large toy helicoplcr which flies, circles and lands. Spain will send "super-modern* character dolls. They are not jay- Ins in advance what the characters will be, other than that they will represent noted politicians, scientists, actors and sports figures. In Osceoia... CALL Harold Siler at Siler's Drug Store fc? everyday delivery of the Blytheville Courier News $1.08 Per Month at Hughes See it in Holiday Magazine this month try it on . here and now! V here's the newest way to travel light! PLATEAU the suit with the weightless feel ...exclusive with Timely Clothes Go 'round Ihe world, or 'round" the lown, but go most comfortably in one of our new Plateau suits. Is Plalcau a "lightweight" suit? ?Vo sir-it's a rpguW wight all-wool worsted. Hill what puts Plateau in a class by itself is a wonderful lightweight /cei-th. result of prelaxing by Pacific Mills. You starl enjoying Plateau the moment you put it on ... a new freeciom-from- clothes comfort that seems lo peel pounds off your back. And thanks to Balanced tailoring by Timely 1 Clothes, you keep on enjoying its good style and fit way beyond the usual life of a suit. By all means, come in and see the rich, lustrous shades that make Plateau so smart. I hen try on Ihe models (single and double-breasted] that are so flatiering to any man! ..,...,..,..„. Plalcau Suils \ \ R.D. HUGHES CO.

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