Elko Daily Free Press from Elko, Nevada on October 11, 1995 · 7
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Elko Daily Free Press from Elko, Nevada · 7

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Elko, Nevada
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Wednesday, October 11, 1995
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7
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Wednesday, October 11, 1995 ELKO DAILY FREE PRESS, Elko, Nevada 7 Founder of society discovers that siinpliryiiig bureaucracy not simple olumlms Bay health and human services czar, Terry Morton, offering to help him streamline his agency, went unanswered. Gov. Steve Merrill responded with a form letter when the society contacted him. Watkins also hasn't heard back from California and Wisconsin, which the society contacted about their innovative welfare reforms. Still, society members are convinced their ideas can and will catch on. Member Janice Sylor says Morton, for example, appears to be using ideas similar to the society's in his reorganization of New Hampshire's largest state agency. "He talks about people having to ble for their own behavior. Everyone has the minimum personal obligation to become and remain self sustaining. Compassion must be reliably available when it's needed. We all have a profound stake in motivating and empowering others to give us their best We all have a profound stake in encouraging constructive creativity. In all human relationships, seek the greatest degree of fairness, not advantage. Watkins admits these ideas may seem a little naive even a little Forrest Gumpish to experienced politicos and other cynics. A letter sent to New Hampshire's Hometown Proud Food People Thursday, Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 4.-00 pjn. 8.-00 pan. I rirnn 1 1 ill' V v 7 - s . v i i NASHUA, N.H. (AP) - There's nothing simple about the Simple Society. Just ask founder John Watkins, who discovered organizing a group dedicated to simplifying bureaucracy was, well, not so simple. Two years ago, Watkins set out on what he thought would be a fairly straightforward quest: saving taxpayers money and grief by getting rid of unnecessary government "I kept looking around and seeing there were simpler ways to solve problems than the ways people tended to advocate," says Watkins, a soft spoken, grandfatherly man at 62. So Watkins and a few friends incorporated the Simple Society, a nonprofit group, hoping its ideas for a streamlined government and social responsibility would spread quickly in a state known for free-thinkers. But it hasnt been as easy as the former management and publishing consultant hoped. Today he spends up to 80 hours a week working at the group's office, which, until recently, doubled as his apartment. Amid bookshelves piled high with books on Shakespeare and religion, Watkins plugs away at a state-of-the-art computer and laser printer. "If you're trying to start something like the Simple Society, life gets complicated," admits Watkins, laughing at the paradox. For starters, it's not easy attracting members. Though the group has received about 450 inquiries, there are only 16 members. "We haven't had a reliable system for following up with interested people," he says. "Getting people to really do things rather than to listen and talk is quite difficult." The society's name also has created confusion. "A lot of people tend to assume we're Shakers, Amish or we're simple," he says. "But we're not We're talking about the bureaucratic process, in industry or in government." The group promotes simplified government with a twist It says less red tape combined with compassion could help foster self-reliance in America. The Simple Society would replace the government's social services bureaucracy with a Human Empowerment Agency designed to help people become self-sufficient. The agency would help needy people by offering them no-fuss "compassionate loans" without forcing them to suffer through duplicative and unnecessary paperwork. Watkins doesn't know what would happen if people weren't interested in helping themselves. "Extreme" cases might be put in some type of protective environment, but he's really not sure. "If you get to a point where this person isn't really trying, then you have to deal with them as antisocial and dysfunctional," he says. These are the Simple Society's six simple principles: Everyone is personally responsi 7 : X i yy, , v.. ;. .: CELEBRATION BB utcher John Watkins was shown working in his Nashua, N.H., office last month. Watkins is the founder of the Simple Society, a group dedicated to simplifying bureaucracy. Workers dismantling crane go through fewer case workers than before, the merging of some departments," she says. "It bears a similarity to what we're saying. Whether that's because of us I dont know." "We need to create some waves, and if we do, politicians will rush out and lead them," Watkins predicts. "Think about how dramatically the philosophical orientation in Washington and across the country has changed just in the last year." If people think Watkins' optimism is far-fetched, he isn't bothered one bit "If you start with anything less than that as a goal, then what are you going to achieve?" he says. "Utopia is not bad, it's a wonderful place to be." jim 4 ; i -ft 7 V (Associilrd PrtMl But until the fire, Sheedy Drayage had never worked on a structure as tall as the Stratosphere. "This company may never see another job at this height," said Sheedy Drayage Chief Executive Officer Adolph Battaini. "That's quite a ways up there." However, the shape of the tower poses more of a problem than its height Battaini said. Normally, a skyscraper has a large, flat roof, allowing workers to install a second crane easily. But the pod at the top of the Stratosphere does not offer nearly as much space. "It just takes a lot of engineering, planning and proper equipment," Battaini said. The CEO plans to visit Las Vegas next week to inspect the crane-removal process. "A project like this takes a lot of eyes," Battaini said. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion You're gaming weight TOO MUCH SUTTER CREATES THIS KINP OF CONCERN. Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. Y Y Y Y X. X i, A II" 3) W & includes: Spaghetti r.Tarlnara (Chef Sam's Recipe) Tossed Green Salad French Dread ca oz. Pepsi Feeds 4-6 people or $10.99 with meatballs ChefSam'8 Recipe or installing a second, smaller crane on the top of the tower. The second crane, which weighs 30 tons, will lower the pieces of the original crane to the ground. Then the second crane will lift a 7-ton derrick to the top. The derrick will be used to carry the sections of the second crane back to the ground. Finally, workers will dismantle the derrick by hand and bring down the pieces in a construction elevator. Completion of the job is expected by Thanksgiving, with the Stratosphere scheduled to open in April. San Francisco-based Sheedy Dray-age is handling the crane-removal task. Stratosphere officials first contacted Sheedy Drayage two years ago when a fire at the top of the tower required the removal of a smaller crane. "These guys are specialists in tough situations," Dawes said. Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form (our ordinary words. LC3EJ MEE Pepperoni, Sausage, or Combination Tossed Green Salad 9G oz. Pepsi Feeds 4-6 people or $7.99 with 64 oz. Pepsi State engineer using new water permit tool DARIC I LAS VEGAS (AP) Construction workers have begun the delicate and dangerous job of dismantling a 75-ton, 400-foot-tall crane atop the Stratosphere Tower, Crews last year raised the crane to the top of the tower in just four days. But the complicated process of taking apart the crane and lowering it to the ground will take close to two months. Scott Dawes, Stratosphere's director of construction, calls the dismantling one of the "most significant challenges" faced by workers on the 1,149-foot-tall structure, which dominates the Las Vegas skyline. Last Dec. 7, a crane collapsed at a Laughlin, Nev. hotel construction site, killing three people. Concern over the Las Vegas operation is heightened by the number of motorists and pedestrians who pass below the crane site. "We take every possible safety precaution that there is," Dawes said. To remove the crane, workers are rates, well logs, and place and manner of use. Public inquiries about the operation of the data base should be directed to James L. Farnham, management analyst for the Water Resources Division. The two agencies have published a reference manual for state and USGS employees who use the system. The 30-page report, titled Reference Manual for Data Base on Nevada Water-Rights Permits, by Kenn D. Car-tier, Eva M. Bauer, and Farnham, is U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 95452. Copies are available for inspection at the U.S. Geological Survey offices in Carson City (333 W. Nye Lane, Room 102) and Las Vegas (6770 S. Paradise Road). The report may also be inspected at the U.S. Geological Survey libraries in Menlo Park, Calif., and Salt Lake City, Utah. In addition, the report may be purchased from the U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services, Denver Federal Center, MS 517, Box 25286, Denver, Colo. 80225)046. Those interested can call (303) 236-7476 for pricing information. Requests should specify "Open-File Report 95452" and include a check or money order payable to "Department of the Interior - USGS." Tnfuie Mew Services mc LEXEP ri I A K A I RODION KYI 1 Shoppe SHIGLE I k A A Nevada Division of Water Resources has implemented a new computer data base for managing water-rights permit information. The new data base was developed as part of a cooperative program between the division and the U.S. Geological Survey to modernize water information systems for Nevada water agencies. The Division of Water Resources maintains the permit data base for its internal administration of water rights and computation of water use within Nevada, explained the USGS. The USGS accesses summary information from the data base for use in scientific studies of water resources in Nevada conducted in cooperation with state and local agencies. The data base provides State Engineer Michael Turnipseed's staff with an efficient interactive menu-driven system for entering, updating, and reporting the water-rights data, USGS said. The ability to quickly access such data by individual permit, basin, area, or time frame enables the water division to more efficiently process permits and provide quick response to public requests, USGS said. Information maintained in the data base includes water-rights ownership, point of diversion, diversion (Answers tomorrow) FANCY COBALT JAILED baseball fans enjoyed this at dinner "CATCH" OF THE DAY Answer here "Y Y i a Yesterday's Jumbles: Answer: O RANCH The THE Your Choice With Our Own Stuffing Recipe Sfuf fed Fori; Chops Stuffed Porli Roost Stuffed Cliiclien Breast Stuffed Cornish Gome lien mm Q How do you treat warts? I Warts can be very stubborn. They are caused by a virus and are contagious by skin-to-skin contact. There are several methods used in the office to treat warts. Topical acids, cryosurgery, and electrosurgery are among the various methods for treating warts. The different therapies are chosen based on the extent of involvement, location of warts, and the age of the patient. rhj fltfllllll IS II Keith M. Gross, M.D. OpIomMe Amsncan Board of Dermatology Boart Certified n Dermatology unvereity Clinical Prolessor Safety First Training Services is conducting a state approved transitional EMT refresher course. Keith M. Gross, M.D. 1900 E. Idaho St. Suite 102 Elko (In the Plaza 40 Shopping Center) 753-9799 Most Major Insurances Accepted Courtesy Insurance Billing Medicare Assignment Accepted October 19 through October 22, 1995 Weekdays 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Weekend 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Cost is $40.00 per person To register call 702-738-2839 or stop by 651 River Street, Elko, NV W ' T mm Training Services ElkoTtievada

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