The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 13, 1952 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, February 13, 1952
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Page 5
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1952 Government'* Interest in God— Line Between. Church, State Hard to Define (This Is the third of » Mrlei on church-slate relationship! In the United States.) By GEORGE CORNELL NEW YORK Itpt— What Interest should the government take in God? That's the heart of a question which has produced a growing de- bat* in the nation's courts and ,| communities. "Th« First Amendment, 1 ' • says the United states Supreme Court, "has erected a wall of separation between church and state which must be kept high and Impregnable." But fame fee). In the words of the Catholic bishops of the United States, that absolute separation Is an "utter distortion" of American traditions that threatens to "ban God from public life." Others say, in the word of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, that the separation principle Is "being questioned, challenged and undermined In many quarters," Yet they, too, call for greater spiritual emphasis. Altitudes Vary Varying attitudes have developed on a score of modern Issues stemming from the central problem. It has "vexed and divided Americans" and the courti as well, said historian Henry steele Commager. At the roots is the struggle of a nation to reinforce Its moral foundations In the face of rampant ma, teriallsm and communism, and At I the same time, to safeguard the religious rights ol each man. Commager put it this way: The riddle IB over "where the line is to be drawn between conscience and authority." How can the .government of a nation, with 360 religious sects within .its borders, (1) favor any without offending others, or (2) favor all without, offending nonbelievers, agnostics or supporters of non-religious systems of ethics? "Religion," James Madison once said, Is not within the purview of human government." In Waterloo, la., a Judge recently was asked to handle a will leaving $70.000 to supporters of the "true Christian religion." Impossible, he said. Our lawa and government, being separate from churcn, define no religion. U. S. Shows Interest The United States' Constitution pays homage to no diety. Its laws spurn any distinctions between beliefs. But the division between church and state never has been complete. Here are a few ways the- government shows Interest in God: f 1. Its coins bear the words "In God We Trust." 2. Churches are tax-exempt. 3. The President and others take their oath on the Bible. 4. Congress has engaged a chaplain and opened with prayer since the founding of the Republic and the Constitutional Convention. 5. Legal documents are dated "In the year of oar Lord." When a witness Is sworn, he affirms, "So help me God." fi. Religious observances—Christmas, Good Friday, Thanksgiving- are legal holidays. Presidents often have called for national prayer. 7. The Declaration of Independence proclaims the "Creator"' the bestower of rights and liberties. The First Amendment, said Father Vincent C. Hopkins, Pordham University historian, dqes not mean "absolute separation" of church and state, either legally or by tradition. "It's not possible," he said. Court Clte» Separation Yet the Supreme Court has declared: "We have itaked the very existence of our country on the talth that complete separation be- tw«n the state and religion Is best (or the state and best for religion." ^ In Topeka, Kan., an organization called, the Christian^ Amendment Movement 1* carrying on • cam- paign to get recognition of Christ as "Savior and King" Into the U S Constitution. There have been a half dozen congressional proposals of this nature—all defeated—the last, one In 1947 by the late Sen. Arthur Capper of Kansas. Scores of court cases have arisen over Sunday laws, with varying results. Although about one-fourth of the states require school flag salutes, the Supreme Court has ruled It unconstitutional to compel children with religious objections to do so. The court also has held in recent times that conscientious objections U> military service, on religions-or other grounds, must be respected. Differences over transportation or other state aid to parochial schools has been one of the keenest issues. JSLYTHEVTIJ.E (ARK.) COURIER KEWS Soviets Report Border Trouble MOSCOW MY—The Soviet press today vonnrted trouble at two Demo Leader May Not Run Indiana Committeeman McHale Likely to Quit INDIANAPOLIS t/Pi — Frank M. McHale. Indiana's long-time Democratic national committeeman, may not seek re-election when his present four-year term ends in May. Hoosier political sources said Wednesday, High among those listed aa possible successors are Gov. Henry F. Schiicker. who has not seen eye- to-eye with McHale for a down years, and Frank M. McKinney, Democratic national chairman and a long-time McHale assolate. McHale said he had no comment on the reports. McHale Is eo years old and an Indianapolis lawyer. He has been national committeeman since 1937. He has been under renewed fire from his political foes since recent disclosure of his legal connections with the Empire Ordnance Corp. He has been accused of "influence peddling"—an accusation he has hotly denied. Both McHale and McKinney made a tea.OOO profit on a $1,000 stock investment in Empire Tractor Co., affiliate of Empire Ordnance. McHale, is chairman of the credentials committee of the Democratic National Committee and tock an active part In support of President Truman in his organization fight with Southern Democrat*. Secrecy Shrouds Second Witness In Trial of Reds LOS ANGELES (/}>/—The government readied its second witness in in air of secrecy today as defense ittorneys resumed hammering at nitial testimony agalast California's 15 tcp Communist.?. U. S. Attorney Waller S. Binns declined to reveal his irtcnlitv, but there were indications lhat his testimony would deal with the more spectacular and allegedly conspiratorial side of the Communist party. In opening cross-examination of San Francisco seaman David Saun- dcrs, the defense yesterday tried to rip the prosecution's first witness on his recollection of dates and associations with seme of the 11 de- endants he hsd named earlier as co-workers during his 10 years party member. Saunders, thrusting aside inferences that he might have been an informer during his Communist career, declared he went to the FBI voluntarily early In 1951 and finally offered to testify In the present case last December, Small Asiatic birds, mferntlng between Siberia and India, cross 20,000-foot peaks of the Himalayas . * '• ,—, •••"lim.ii.i leixjus 6:l |n ine.v ure col ertius atolls Communist China's long bor-1 es and terrorizing the people The papers said one Northern Burmese district near the Chinese border Is being governed by 1,300 well - armed Chine.se Nationalist, troops in American uniform. The reports said they nre collecting tax- E nvi Prom Peiping, the press reported a sharp attack In the Communist organ Jen Min Jih Pao en reported British persecution of Chinese "patriots" In Hong Kong. The Orinoco Kiver In Venezuela has a mean depth of 335 feet. 5 Doctors Prove This Plan Breaks The Laxative Habit FOR SALE! Calcium Ammonium Nitrate 0^ PER CENT NITROGEN Because Cmrr'n not only "anMork" thf u*cl hut they ilm imi-rnvr For InformaHon and Price, Call WEST MEMPHIS COTTON OIL MILL WEST MEMPHIS, ARK. Phon. Wesl Mempnis, S4 Phone M e M ' p hi g , 5-4040 ^ c CHOICE : OF MILLIONS^ StJoseph ASPIRIN You Can't B»ar a M«diein« That's GOOD! HERE'S HOW YOU CAN RELIEVE A REAL CAUSE of STOMACH DISTRESS 1 ?*," Deficiencies of Vitamins Bi* Ba, Niacin and Iron If you're bothered by a «tom«ch disturbance (gas, Indigestion, heartburn and can't ever eat good food without suffering afterward) due to deficiencies ol vitamins Bi, Si, Nfacln and Iron In your system — don't b« satisfied to merely relieve your symptoms. Not when It'i possible for HADACOI, to relieve the deficiencies which may be the Teal and underlying CAT/SC of your stomach distress. Let HADACOL bring about an amazing Improvement in your condition. Anil so importantl Continued use or HADACOL not only gives continuous, complete relief but helps prevent such deficiency- caused stomach disturbances from comlng back. This Is the ABsottrrr TRUTH that no one can deny. This Is vrhat you mrl.il do if you want honest-to-good ness real relief and freedom from the miseries of such disturbances. You can't beat a product that's GOOD! Buy a bottle of HADACOL torlay and take It faithfully. HADACOL t>h>M S.kn4W>i—Tfc.T.-i 0«l r Off O.n.ln. HABACOl RECLEANED SOYBEANS MEAN GREATER YIELDS! Let Us Clean Your Seed Soybeans. We Have Two Modern Cleaners. Increase the Puritv of Your Seed, Have Them Rocleaned. Blytheville Soybean Corp. 1800 W. Main Phone fiSofi or RS57 Sho'nuff Good Eatin'! «'i*'f? Y f?' G P ' G * COKE - p "<:h E rj on hickory wood. Blylhevllle High School co-crts enjoy the Dixie Pii favorite. They are cleft to right) Frcemn Borowsky Betty Ann Mulllns, Joan Perkins, Joy Edens, Sandra Long, Nlln Rose Hall, Martlm Nichols. Winnie Beth Buckley, (Mr. Halscll). Beverl.n- Mulllns. Melballne, Hill, Mary Ann Henry, Rose Mnry Monahan Donna bus Gore. Ann Hlndman, Kay Smith. Mary Lane, Doris Bean, Sue Stanfield, Joann Earls, Emmndel Swearengen, Sandra Lunsford and Betty Ann Johnson \7"ouVe often wondered what makes the barbecued pig- sandwich so wonderfully delicious at the Dixie Pig? Well, we've decided to let you in on our little secret—if you've been out to the Dixie Pig recently you have seen the biggest part of our secret; HICKORY WOOD. Of course, there's know- how involved, too! But, we've made sure that we'll have plenty of hickory available. ; Next time you want to enjoy "sho 1 nuff good eatin'," we cordially invite you to come out to the Dixie Pig for honest-to-goodness, hickory cooked, pit barbecue. When You Feel Piggish Come Out to Ernest's The DIXIE PIG N. Highway 61 Phone 4636

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