The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 29, 1952 · Page 8
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 8

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, January 29, 1952
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Page 8
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KOTT BLiTUjBVlLLB (ARK.) COURIER NEW! Kentucky Regains Top Spot In Weekly Basketball Ballot By ED CORRKiAN NEW YORK (AP)—Kentucky climbed into the No. 1 spot in the weekly Associated ~ ^ Skip Alexander Is Sports '*Most Courageous' of 1951 * . • Bf RAIJPH BERNSTEIN . PHKADBLPHIA (AP)-^Stewart (Skip) Alexander thanked "bor- wd ooBn*e" and the marveta erf modern medicine for the privilege b»ta« tltn to mcetoc ttot Philadelphia sportswriters accolade as "Most who foueht b back to *• watttne tournament aMw H major operations for i injuries mffered a ptane crash, * 'honored lut nigtt M. fee 48th k annual Writers' Dtaatr. MM fet- 1 4d with rout beef •' and trophie* were halfback, Dick Kaimaler, the "Athtefc of the .Year." mid Bob , '^Maryland tacile, 'the "Ltrie- ,__I*» : mi>n of the Year," Hi. f »ee lln«4;»*kh «oar* arid hto ' controlled some -akint, stilt bent bruUed. Alexander told some dbWrcthat he.owed part of recovery to letters and tele- i of enoouragetnent from peo- pl» «1 oter the nation. "It was «** o* borrowed courage," he said. .- InJ»r*d In MM. clearly but hesitantly. «aid. b* accepted the booor wHh irainillty. "itace the real •onr«g» being ^ displayed today is t» the boys who aren't -here, the men in Korea." Alexander was Injured Sept. 24, . .shortly after. he had finished ii In tt* Kansas City Open. He wa» teyir* to get home to see nts #amny in Lexington, N. C,, before •mbarktng on an -exhibition tour *o South America and the West Indies. The Civil Air Patrol ottered to fly Him to Louisville. The CAP plan* crashed near Evansville, Ind. Airport killing three CAP officers. •Alewander, although badly burned, mmeA taw. the wreckage. Alexander now:fa * pro »t the l«k«woo<t Country club, St. Peters- Moody, Perez Are Losers in Legion Bout Because they played too rough Wuardo Perez and Jack Moody were disqualified in the r«g match main evtnt of the American Legion's wrestling bouts at Memorial Auditorium last night; Their opponents Rex Mobley anrt George Cologne were awarded the Ug: BUitch victory by Referee Virgil Hatfield who waved Moody and Pere« from the ring after 12 minutes of the third fall because they Insisted on using the choke hold whlr-h is barred. At the time of the referee's action, the two tag teams were all even In falls, Perez and Moody won the first round In 15 minutes but Mobley and Cologne came back to taV- the second fall In 20 minuter The third fall started fast and furious with Perez and Moody working over Mobley and Cologne. But that didn't satisfy them. They decided .after a time that Hntfleld wasn't doing to suit them so they went to work on htm. In the preliminary bouts, Cologne beat Moody In 10 minutes and Perez was disqualified after nine minut« for choking. Courier News Classified Ads. Adolph Rupp's quintet totaled 780 joints to 755 for Kansas State and 745 for third-place Illinois. The three were far out front. Fourth- place Kansas had 523 point* and fifth-place St. Bonaventure, one of the two major undefeated teams tort, had 457. Kertucky, which was on top of the first three polls of the season, lured 32 first-place votes from the nation's sports writers and «port-i- c/isters. Each first-place vote counted 10 points, second place nine, and so on down the line. Si. Loud Sixth Rounding out the first 10, In order, were St. Louis, Duquesne the other- ; undefeated team, Iowa Washington and West Virginia. The most Impressive jump was made by Kansas State, which was seventh a week ago. The K-stnters hung the first defeat of the season on Kansas, which had been in the No. 1 or 2 spot for four straight weeks. The Jayhawks, Incidentally, got one first-place vote. I>wjae»ne Wins The first lo took a real scrambling. In fact, the only school that held the -spot 'It was In a week ago wns St. Bonaventure, No. 6 Illinois the top of the heap last -week, also tasted its first defeat in the Interim. Duquesne, which Jumped from the No. 10 position, made its record 120 last night by whipping Villanova, 83-61. while the llllnl trounced Purdue, 84-57, in the only games Involving first-ten teams. Seton Hall Jumped to the chief threatening spot .this week, holding uown the No. ll--spost,'which was given up by Holy: Cross, now No 17, College Basketball Pittsburgh 62 Notre Dame M Duquesne 83 Villanova 61 Boston College 15 Palrfteld Conn Illinois M Purdue 57 Iowa State 78 Nebraska n Oklahoma City «] Drake 47 Kentucky 88 Vanderbllt 51 South Carolina 61 Georgia Tech Indians Name Three Negroes Who Might Play on Dallas Club CLEVELAND MP>—The Cleveland Indians named three Negro players today who might play for their farm team at Dallas Iii the Class AA Texas League. They are Al Smith, 24. and Dave Pope, 26, both third baseman and outtielders and both now playing in.the Puerto RIcan League; and Dave Hosktas, 26, an outfielder and pitcher last season with Wilkes- Barre. The Dallas club's owner announced Sunday he would use Negro players this year for the first time in the league's history. All three men the Indians named are tinder contract to the Tribe's farm team at Indianapolis but none ever played there. Whether they go to a higher rated club than Dallas will depend on how they do In spring training, the club -lid. Harrison to Play Ripley Friday Harrison High School's Dragons go to Ripley, Tenn., Friday night to begin the last lnp ot their 1951-52 basketball schedule. Following the Ripley trip the Dragons will have 11 games remaining on the schedule. Other games are: Feb. 1 Joncsboro, there- Feb 2 Hayti there; Feb. 7 Ripley here- Feb 9 New Madrid here; Feb. n Frenchman's Bayou there; Feb. 14-15 Paducah, Ky., there; Feb. 1 19 sikeston here; Feb. 21 Sikeston, there- Feb. 22 Earle here; Feb. a« Earle there. Safety Measure Oarage owners should provide suitable receptacles for greasy rags and a sate place for using gasoline or kerosene in cleansing part* of vehicles. Bros. 49 Tennessee 68 Georgia 62 Arkansas Tech 80 Southern State Texas 43 Oklahoma 39 Saint Edwards Tex 61 Lamar Tech Tex 46 Southwest Texas 74 Sam Houston Midwestern 5S Stephen F. Austin 51 overtime Hendrlx 67 Ouachita 63 overtime Seattle 85 Whltirorth SO Phillips oilers 90 Regis Denver il lit If you don't find us at home next Sunday, we'll be having dinner at the RAZORBACK. FOR RENT Typewriters&Adding Machines New & Late Model Machine*—Low Rote* W« hny used offke machines A furniture. ' Johnson Office Equipment Co. SALES—SERVICE _. U 2 S. Broad*ay—Phone 4429 TUESDAY; JANUARY », Chicks Invade Steele, Mo. Tomorrow Night Bees Will Play Bulldogs' T~ ———Reserves in Doubleheader Duquesne 1$ Backing a Stiff Jinx Coach Jimmy Fisher's Blvthevillc PhiMra cf;n ,. 1 •*• - IX ill r\ I o Keep Unbeaten Record Intact Coach Jimmy Fisher's Blytheville Chicks, still smarting from their heartbreaking 63-62 loss to Greenway in the Paragould tournament last Friday night, return to action tomorrow night when they invade Steele, Mo., for a jrame with the Steele Bulldog. * The game will be the feature of* doubleheader booked for the Steele High School gym. In * preliminary tilt the Chick Bees are slated to meet the Bulldog re- £rves. Coach Fisher h»d his tribe back at work yesterday and he spent connlderable time In drilling his charges on ball moving tactic*. He worked on two new systems of moving the ball against a press- Ing defense. Inability to move against Oreenway's tight man-to- man defense was blamed by Fisher for their loss In the tournament. Following tomorrow night's game with Steele, the Chicks are scheduled to go to Poplar. Bluff, Mo, Friday night for. a game with the always tough Mules. The following Tuesday, 'Fixer'Accused Of Tax Evasion Sollaxzo Indicted In New York on Income Tax Charge NEW YORK (AP) — Salvatore «""«- JJ"A HJLS year ana extend meir sonazzo, convicted basketball g»me winning streak. currently 12 fixer, will be brought to trial In the straight, until It embraces the en- , e Chlckn return home to engage the Paragould Bulldogs and then they go to Bay for a return game with Bay High School's Yellowjackets. After the Bay game, the chicks come back home to play Whitehaven, Term., Feb. 12. Then they go to Paragould Feb. 15 to play Greene County Tech before return- Ing home to close the season/ On Feb. 19, the chicks are ached- iled to play the Piggott Mohawks at the Hale Field gym and on Feb 22 they close the season against Manila. This also wilf be game. a home near future for allegedly evading »264,455 in federal income taxes Sollazzo was Indicted yesterday on charges of evading C53.87S in federal Income taxes lor the year 1945 Last spring he was indicted for allegedly evading {210.779 In income taxes for the year 1944. v. S. Attorney Myles J. Lane a former professional hockey player said that the two indictments would be consolidated for trial In the near future, if convicted on both Indictments Sollazzo' would be subject to a maximum penalty of 10 years imprisonment and a «20000 fine. Sollazzo, who pleaded guilty to fixing basketball games In Madison Square Garden, is serving an eight to 16-year sentence. Tech Whips Southern To Protect AIC Record RU8SELLVILLE, Ark. W>-Arkansas Tech flood today 'as the only undefeated team In the Arkansas Intercollegiate Conference basketball Th« young Wonder Boys, who*.— offset their lack of experience with »P*eu and talent, .registered their 10th league victory last night as they crushed their nearest title rival, Southern State, 80-45. Southern, which now has a 1-1 oop record, may hsve lost more nan a game. C'alyin Thomas the Mulerlders' all-AIC center and second high point man in the league was reported to have been declared neligible for falling to make pass- ng grades. He did not play against Tech lost night. The upsUrt Wonder Boys, packed with freshmen and sophomores, weren't given much of * chance to retain their crown when th« season opened became of a lack of ex- >erience and the graduation of the n-eat Deward Dopson, high scor- ng center. nopson's replacement," E. C. O'Neal, led Tech last night with 17 points. Bill Boyd, playing in place of Thomas, was high for Southern with 12. . In another AIC. scrap last night lendrlx hipped Ouachita 67-M In .wo overtime periods. Cooler Teams To Dedicate Gym COOTER, Mo. _ CooUr -High School wilt dedicate Its hew gymnasium with a doubleheader against Braggadocio teams Saturday night, J. E. Godwin, superintendent of schools said today. ; The doubleheader will pit the looter girls agalnat the Braggadocio girls In the first game at 7:30 ). m. and the Cooter boys against Braggadocio In the feature game. Osceola Plays Marked Tree Teams Tonight OSCEOLA—Osceola High School's semlnoles and Semlnolettcs will renew their ancient athletic rivalry with Marked Tree tonight, when they Play the Indians In a doubleheader at the Osceola High School gym Coach Dukie Speck announced this morning that the Seminoles will play Marked Tree instead of Reiser as previously scheduled. The Keiser games were cancelled because Osceola .and Keiser are scheduled to meet In the first round of the county tournament next month. Marked Tree annually has one of the top girls' teams in the state so tee girls' game, which Is slated lor 7:30, will be the feature of the twin bill. Marked Tree is coached by Johnny Bearden, who coached here last year. Bums Sign Contract _ BROOKLYN CAP) _ Brooklyn recommend Dodgers and the city of Vero ' ' Beach, Fla., yesterday signed a 21- year contract for use of the Dodger- town eprlng training base. Taylor to Scranton SCBANTON, Pa. (AP) - Zach Taylor, former manager of the St. Louis Browns, yesterday was named manager of Scranton of the Eastern League. NEW YORK Wr-Duquesne, one of the nation's two unbeaten collegiate basketball teams i. bueklac a stiff Jinx in Its effort to finish the season with a perfect record.' ' Just look at this: , Last year, the Dukes won then- first 10 games—then boom! a 12- polnt loss to Cincinnati. The year before that it was 16 straight, before Louisville stepped in. And in the three years before that, the Dukes started out with in streaks of six, 12 and 19 games. This, naturally, leaves only one question in mind: Will they escape that jinx this year and extend their tire season? Whip VUlanoT* They certainly locked like the real stuff last night (n whipping Villanova 83-61 and holding the Wildcats' big scorer, Larry Hennessey, to one point. After the game, Hennessey's coach, Al Severeance. said his star — a gent who had averaged 22 points a game—just couldn't cope with the guarding of the tall Du^ players. Jim Kennedy, a six-foot senior, led the Duquesne onslaught with a 29 point barrage. The only stumbling block seems to be St. Bonaventure, the other undefeated team. The Bonnies. like Duquesne, have racked up 12 straight wins. They meet feb. 11. The No. i team, Kentucky, also saw action last night, whipping Vanderbllt 88-51. cliff Hagan scored 27 points as the Wildcats won their 15th game in 17 starts. Illinl Bouncei Brick Last week's top team, Illinois, was upset by DePaul Saturday night and fell to the No. 3 slot. But the Illini bounced back last night and drubbed Purdue 84-57 (or their fifth straight Big Ten victory. In other leading games, Pittsburgh upset Notre Dame 62-55; Iowa State turned back Nebraska 7S-72 in a Big Seven.tilt; Texas downed Oklahoma 43-39; South Carolina trimmed Georgia Tech 67-58; Tennessee nipped Georgia 68-62, and Furman out- laated VMI 80-76. In this latter game. Frank Selvy, a sophomore, poured in 44 points !or Furman. He netted 17 field goals and 10 fouls. Cobb Speaks Out in Favor Of Negroes in Baseball MENLO PARK, Calif. W,—Tyrus Raymond Cobb, fiery old tun* star of the diamond, stepped up to the plate today to clout a verb*! home run in favor of Negroes In baseball. : ~ * Himself a native of the deep A , m i A south. Cobb voiced approval of the Aging LaMotta Decisioned by Boston Negro BOSTON <AP)—Knockout beatings by Champion Sugar Rqy Robinson and Irish Bob Murphy appear to have taken a high toll on Jake LaMotta. boxing's famed Dull of the Bronx. After a five-months layoff the ex-mitldleweight titlist returned 'to the ring wars last night and dropped a lo-round split decision to Norman Hayes, Boston's 20-year- oW Negro battler who has championship ambitions. Jake, now 30, appeared fat and heavy-footed at 169?; pounds. He punched with hfs oldtime reckless abandon but, against Hayes, who proved ensy to hit, .Jake's blows seemed to lack their former zing. Referee Mel Manning gave Hayes a 99-38 points margin. Judge Johnny Norton 98-97 and Judge Joe Ricciotti sided with LaMotta. 97-95. LaMotta was a 1-2 favorite with a 51 pounds weight advantage. Braves Sell Kerr BOSTON (AP) — Boston Braves yesterday sold shortstop Buddy Kerr to their Milwaukee American Association farm club. The capital Kabul. ot Afghanistan is Senator Believes Committee Will Uphold Reserve Clause re- PHILADELPHIA <JP>— Sen. Edwin C. Johnson (D-Colo) believes the Celler Committee which investigated organized baseball probably would uphold the game's reserve clause and recommend establishment of a board of appeals. Johnson told the 48th aruiual Philadelphia Sportswriters' Dinner last night that he had spoken to members of the committee and believed they would make their port sometime in March. "The committee appears ready to commend establishment of the appeals board which would settle any contract dispute between organized baseball and the players," he said. Johnson said he hoped the committee headed by Rep. Emmanuel Ce)ler m-NY) had he!d its last hearing. "I wa^ really worried about that commltte* for a while," said Johnson, who also Is president ot the Western Baseball League. I un- dersland they were thinking of recommending five major leagues at one time. And they also were thinking of abolishing the reserve clause that baseball needs badly. But I'm couldn't get and so decided against them." Johnson said the committee was going to issue B report which it will call the "Bible or Encyclopedia of Baseball." happy to report they a unanimous vote those issues U. S. Ski Team Trimmed to Six ST. ANTON, Austria (AP)—The D. S. Olympic women's ski team yesterday was trimmed to the maximum number of six. The six are Mrs. Andrea Mead Lawrence, Rutland, vt; jannette <=<=!,> isked\ ( larter \ tuous; /• recent decision of the Dallas club to use Negro, players I f they! :ame up to Texas! League caliber. The Georgia^ Peach of Detroit, Tigers fame was? fighter from the word go ._ ing hLs brilliant, playing cart He neither ask nor gave quar 24 tumultuous; years in the American League. Tjr Cobb Time has mellowed the-one tim« firebrand and he views the sport in the pleasant role of country squire. He spoke emphatically on the subject of Negroes iii baseball, however. "Certainly it is O. K. for them to play," he said. "I see no reason in the world why we shouldn't compete with ^colored athletes as long AS they conduct themselves with politeness and gentility. Likes Xpfru Race 'Let me say also that no whit* man has the right to be less of a gentleman than a colored man. in my book that goes not only for baseball but In all walks of life. "I like the Negro race personally. When. I was little I had a colored mammy. I played with colored children." Referring again' to last week'i developments in the Texas League. Cobb declared "it was bound to come." He meant the breaking down of baseball's , racial barrier* In the old south. Cobb expressed the belief Negroes eventually would be playing In every league in. the country. He concluded with: "Why not,"as long ai they deport themselves like gen- - tlemen?" Burr, North ^ „., „_„ lvu _ dolph, Hayden, Colo.; 'Betty^Welri '' Omaha, Nebr., and Sandra Tomlln son, Vancouver, B. C. Seattle; Imogene Opton,, Conway, N..H.; Katy Bo-" ^Goocf... In your paper tomorrow 1952 FORD Setter... Best/ In whiskey, too, .there is good...better...and. Hi" Whiskey atfte 'Fesfr • LIND JSS** 1 - cxr -- Bin».l ND *""• "XTUCKY •«!«*» HfrTSIfTf CWITMtIS HSUTM1. ptMTt , TM HIU WO MtU CCMMWr, CHAIN «.

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