The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 28, 1952 · Page 10
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 10

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, January 28, 1952
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Page 10
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PAGE TOM MOM>A1', JANUAKX Ike's' Home Base Is Up in Air Like Rest Of Country About Presidential Election {•MTOKS JfOTB: Jack Bt*, Alilifcni Prm p<*Ue»l rrpori- m, hM rtMBMl hk McM Mmv- fcf •< v*U«k*l opinion mf ter <*r- •tfaff the Mld-wett Democratic C«nf<r«BM. Thta U MM of a M*M W irtitiCi OB hi. findings.) By JACK BEIJL KANSAS ornr CAP) — This Ixxne txue" area for Gen. Dwiijht D. H*etihower and President Tni- man i« as much up in the air as «K r*»t of the country about this presidential race. Democratic uncertainty u; just as neat in President Trumnn's home ltet« of Missouri as It is elsewhere about his future plans. MtasoKi h Ready Mr. Trumnn can have Missouri's eonrentlon votes— and Kansas' too — U he will just say he Intends to run again. But aome of the Derno- arate are getting restive about the delay hi a White House announcement. The uncertainty about Eisenhower centers on conflicting opinion here as to whether the general can come home froirt Europe to speak In his own behalf before the Republican Convention — and whether inch a move Is necessary to win the OOP nomination for him. General Needs "Civvies" The consensus of Elsenhower's leaders In this area — Including Harry Darby, Kansas GOP national eommitteeman and one of the top brains of tha Eisenhower -for President drive— seems to be that the general ought to get hack Into cl- Tlllan clothes before the Chicago convention in July. Most talked about here U a schedule which would bring him back to this country by mid-March, pot&ibly to report to tha President, Congress and the people on the progress of European rearmament. The general has said he will take no port in campaign activities In his bfthalf before the nominating con- YeMttoa. His rooters say that, to ttiem, this means only that he will pot campaign hi Individual states. Wiejr contend that he could make three or four speeches on the Issues of the d»j from liU rostrum as president ot Columbia University. One Mock KMnaini Such a course might dispose of the no-campaigning pledge but nobody in the Eisenhower camp here has' quite been able to figure out )mt how to circumvent the eener- al'j statement he will not p--.lt to be K&ewd from hta European command. President Truman further complicated ttwt point by laying he meoa't kitend to relieve the gen- Bmnhower asks for it. Maybonk Te//s Opposition to Truman in '52 WASHINGTON. (/P>—Sen. Maybank (D-SC), a fcey man In Con- ress on many administration icasures, said today he Is against, nothcr term lor President Truman. And Maybank, Democratic na- onal coinmlttceman from South arollna, predicted "most o( the outh" will unite behind Sen. Rusell of Georgia for (he party's presl- ential nomination. 'As far as I am concerned, 1 am or Dick Russell first, last and all le way," Maybnnk told a rei>orter. He has said that much Iwtore. 3ut he added this Is the first time —1948 included—he publicly has oiced opposition to nominating >lr. Truman. The President hasn't disclosed •nether he will run again. Over le week-end, Democratic leaders rom 13 Midwestern states adopted resolution calling on the Presl- cnt to be a candidate. They also ndorscd Vice President Barkley for .nothcr term. U.N. Ooottoued from may be latent In the Soviet repre tenkfttlve's statement of Jan. V In the speech fco which. Cooper Kf erred, Vlshlnsky accused the United States of preparing nggres >ive measures against Commutits China along the South China bor ders. lite , Soviet diplomat then declared: "These Illegal — flagrantly lUegn —acts of the United States, we cai , b« quite sure, will be declared fc be defensive measures ngniiis China's aggression whenever event begin to take their course on th southern borders of China, In Trml land, Burma and Yunan provlnc of China." Toff- Launches Speaking Tour Through Florida Hy The Associated Prtss The Republican presidential -race stepped up In tempo today with Senator Taft making a whirlwind speaking tour of Fiorlda and Gc-n, Dwight D. Elsenhower f|iuilifying for tho New Hampshire primary, Taft, his eye obviously on Florida's ten national convention votes, planned three talks—at Tampa, St. Petersburg, and Orlando—in one day. Elsenhower Qualified for the New Hampshire March II primary yes- terctiiy simply by not notifying officials to withdraw his name. However, c 11 try of E Isc nl i o we r's name in tho Minnesota primary, believed to be a virtual certainly a week nRo, may be blocked by hackcr.s In Washington. The general's scrnicglslf are said to feel that delegates pledged to Harold E. Stnssen, Minnesota "favorite son", might switch to Eisenhower later if the goticrnl doesn't oppose Stasscn at this time. AIR BASE Arkansas Death Toll Drops Off In Past Week By The Associated Press Eleven violent deaths were re- orded in Arkansas last week. It was the smallest weekly toll so ir In 1052. Six of the fatalities — four Irnf- ftc deaths and two suicides— oc- .urrcd Saturday. John Brown Foster, 19, and Gayon Young, 17, were Injured fatally when n truck In which they were riding left Highway 62 on a curve near the Fulton -Baxter County inc. Both were residents of the Community in Fulton Elizabeth lounty. J. D. Thomn.s, 72, Negro, of Proc- x>r. wns killed when he was hit >y D n a ulomobl le two m lies west of Lehl (n Ciittenden County. Winfrcd White, 37-year-old North jlttle Rock Negro, was Injured fatally when the car in which he was riding left Highway 167 about 18 miles south of Little Rock and overturned. A 70-year-old man took his 0' Ife near Dumas when he shot himself with a shotgun; slashed hi: :hroat, and jumped into A ditch. Coroner A. B. Dyer, who ruled the death a suicide, Identified the dead man us Sam Tupelo, 70, of Arkansas City. A 19-year-old boy hanged himself near his farm home on the outskirts of Camden. Obituaries Haynes Child Dies Of Heart Attack David Madison Haynes, three nnc one-half-month-old son of Sgt. ant Mrs. John M. Haynes, formerly o Clear Ijnke, died last night at Bl- loxl, Miss., of u heart attack. Funeral arrangements rtre lueom pletc. Sgt. and Mrs. Haynes lived at Clear Lake where Mr. Huyiie. was u fanner until six months agi when lie volunteered Into the Unit ed States Air Force. Survivors include the boy's par cnts; paternal grandparents. Mr nnd Mrs. J. A. Haynes of Clear Lnke and maternal grandparents, Mr. anc Mrs. Irvln Alexander o( Half Moon POLIO (Continued from Page 1) gin at the same time. In pointing ant the need funds, Mr Snodgrnss said Jonesboro Man Talks To Insurance Group Blytheville Association of Life Underwriters heard \V. W, Yopp o! Jonp.sbcro discuss "Determination und Self Control" at the regular meeting of the. group Saturday. Mr. Yopp is mannger of Life and Casualty Insurance Company. J. M. Birchett, ngcnt for Interstate Life and Accldcr.l Insurance Company was taken Into the nssociation. Foundation for Infantile Pnralysl has spent $80.(MM) fn the past thrc years for treatment of MIssLisIpp County polio victims. Although ther was no epidemic In the county Ins year, he said, $4,700 was spent o the treatment of victims strlcke In past years. This represents funds provided b the Foundation in addition to th funds which remain here after eac annual campaign, It was pointe out. Last year's total expense wa $11.827.81 .foiuihe"treatment of 4 victims. Of these cases, 40 were ol cases nnd five"we're new. The Mississippi County Clmpt of the polio foundation began 1952 with $3.G80.03 In unpaid bills. The cnmpnlgn Is scheduled continue until Jan. 31. It wns lounccd today by EJbert Johnso county chairman, thnt MiJto Bunch hnr been named commuiii chairman for Yarbro. 8 on Airliner Are Shaken ike Peat in Pod' at hip Drops 3,900 Feet Cf.EVELAND (iVi — Eighteen fi.scngcrs on a Capital Airlines oacli plane were tossed about like cas in a pod and five Injured to- ay when a sutlden downdralt aused the ship to drop 3,800 feet efore leveling off, The five were taken to Berea Community Hospital nft«r Pilot Vllllam Mason of Washington adloed for a doctor and an nm- ulance to meet the plane on its rival in Cleveland. One person was released after rcatment and none of the others .'as believed Injured seriously. The plane, from Washington to Chicago, was flying near East Liverpool, o., at 6,000 feet when he accident happened. SPECK (Continued from Pagt » cha iice the people of Arkansas would have had to participate In the naming of a Republican candidate for president. Speck probably was the first man at least in recent years, to announce in advance that he was seeking the Republican nomination for governor. Customarily the nomination has been made by the State Republican Executive Committee on authorization of the Republican state convention. That wa-s the way it was done two years ago when Speck ran against Democratic Gov. S!tl Me Math. Sell it ... by using classified advertising in the COURIER! Ads placed before 9 a.m. will appear same day. All classified advertising payable in advance. BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS (Continued from Page I) by the City of Blythcville to per- rm any portion of the following solution: "It Ls resolved by the City Conn- that; "The City of Dlythevtllc wiU ionate the lee simple title to the onner Blythevitlc Army Air Field o the United States Government Us entirety without reserva- lon.s or restrictions, "Tlii! City of illytlittvillc will ac- iiire and donate (o the United latcs government, the In ml rc- Inired for the expulsion of tlic nslaHatinn and in addition the "ity will acquire :nnl donate liinds iccessary for installations of nav- Eonal aids for use by the former Blythcvllle Army Air Field. The CiLy of Blythcville will enact and enforce navigation nnd /toning ordinances to provide navigation casements to conform with existing Air Force criteria including tho removal of any UJght hazards within the glide angle. "The City will take the necessary slejis io remove tenants and pay the cost for their removal hin 30-days of receipt of intent (o activate by the Air Force. 4 'The City, upon request, will grant to the Government n right of entry for construction at the former Blyhevlllc Army Air Field. "Upon request, the City will furnish adequate space for Organized Reserve Corps activities, "The United Slates Government will have exclusive use of the former Blytheville Army Air Field. "The City of Blytlieville will provide those utilities required fn support of the former Blytheville Army Air Field to the boundaries of such field. "The City ot Blytheville will acquire the necessary easements for utilities mentioned tibove. "The City of BlyfhevUle will make every possible effort to provide a minimum of 800 rental housing units or such other ho us- Inx requirements as will be generated by the Air Force utilization of the former Blytheville Army Air Field. "The City of Blylheville will ta^e the necessary steps to insure the maintenance of fair rental costs for both military and civilian personnel. "The City of Blythcville will cooperate in providing adequate recreational, ntliTcttc. and cultural facilities off-base. "The City of Blytheville wll provide the necessary school ities and expand HS necessary tc absorb dependents of mlliUir. personnel who will be stationed EV the former Blythcville Army AI LITTLE ROCK. WV-Arkansas supporters of Gen. Dwight Eisenhower for president will ask their national headquarters to request a preferential primary in Arkansas. Jell Speck, chairman of the steering committee of the Eisenhower- f or- President Club in Arkansas, Commodity And Stock Markets- N«w York Cotton Mar. May July Oct. Open High Low 1:30 4191 4170 . 4131 . 3835 4197 4174 4133 3385 4175 4150 4110 3866 4182 4155 4116 3871 New Orleans Cotton Mar. May July Oct. Open High Low Close 4190 4174 4132 3878 4200 4178 4137 3890 4114 4151 4111 3868 4180 4158 4110 3880 Soybeans said at an organizational meeting ere yesterday that the primary oultl be sought in an attempt to Arkansas' 11 delegates to the OP's national convention from at- nding without Instructions. Sj>eek Id that the delegates, if unin- ructcd, would "go for Sen, Taft." Spt!ck said the group would set ;) state headquarters today at the jirion Hotel here, and soon would egin a state-wide advertising cam- iiij!n. Speck was the Republican candi- ;ite for governor of Arkansas in 050. He lives at Frenchman's : ayou. Other members of the steering ommlttee appointed yesterday are . L. Hollowell, North Little Hock; )- J. McInturtT, Marshall; Verne •indall. Stuttgart; c. R. Watsdn. ,rkadelphia, and Miss Marian imlth, Mrs. Jane O'Bannon, Wilam Rector, George Hampton and loberl Roach, all of Little Rock. Men. May July Sep. High 299 293 *i 291 284',! Low 597 : ;i 29171 28011 Close 298 293 290W 2 83 V, New York Stocks A T & T Amer Tobacco Anaconda Copper Beth Steel Chrysler Coca-Cola Gen Electric Gen Motors Montgcmery Ward N Y Central Int Harvester J C Penney Republic Steel Radio Socony Vacuum Studebaker Standard of N J Texas Corp Sears .. U S Steel Sou Pac W. Germany Demands Admittance into NATO PARIS (O*t— Ttw West Germans say they will not furnish troops for Western defense unless they art allowed In the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Their surprise demand for NATO membership, made last night at a meeting of West European foreign ministers. Interrupted the six-nation talks on a unified European army. The :nag came as the European: diplomatic chiefs announced agreement on broad outlines and fundamental principles of a one-uniform nrmy to function within the North Atlantic setup. German 1$ Insistent The West German delegate. State Secretary Walter Hallsteln, Insisted Germany should either be brought into NATO Immediately or, if this were not feasible, should be given a pledge of membership later. If membership were postponed for political reasons, he demanded an Interim system which would protect Germnny's rights. Hallstetn's demand, brought up during discussions of the proposed European army's relationship with NATO, rocked the foreign ministers from Prance, Knly. Belgium. and Luxembourg. They the demand tcmponmly, pending study of the Gern'an bid Holland shelved 155 5-8 64 3-8 54 1-2 by t h e j r norne governments. 52 1-2 Finish Wus Hor«l For 10 1-4 The ministers had hot>?d to fV'ish 1C6 1-4'a draft treaty for (he European 59 1-4 j army at this inertinj. Now t'.-ey 51 3-4 | face another conference some tiin^ 64 1-8 i before Feb. 10, u-im the NATO 20 1-8 35 5-8 j - 10 1-2 | stags 12.00-14.00: bMS-s 10.30-13.00. 43 1-8 i Cattle 3,700. calves 500; opsnlns 24 5-8 active on all classes, with steers. 40 1-41 heifers and low choice steers and 33 3-8 I heifers 30.00-34.50: Individual prime 84 3-8. heifers 35.00; utility and commer- 593-8'Ctal steers and heifers 25.00-20.00; 56 | utility and commercial cows 21.W- 403-4,24.00; canners and cutters 16.0064 1-8 21.50. Council opens Its sessloas In Lisbon. The German problem was lumped with other rrm.tters still unsettled, including the duration of the army treaty and supervision of the army's common budget, In their closing communique the foreign ministers said, "A final agreement on essential points will be achieved In the near future." Chevrolet Agency Here ' To Have Mobile Display A mobile display of six animated models of Chevrolet engineering developments will go on display at Sullivan-Nelson Chevrolet Co.. 301 West Walnut, Wednesday. The exhibit will include operable cut-away nicdels of car and Iruck brakes auto body, hydraulic valve- lifters, automatic transmission, calve-in-h'ad engine and syuchro- m-: h I' :: transmission. Ihc clisp.av, mcunted en a tiu?;:- - 'atler van will be here until Feb. Finsd for Le ",'>ncj EGYPT (Continued rrom Page 1) justness concerns. They fired oc- :asionally over the heads of peo- )le who got too close to buildings •ulned In the rioting. Businesses re-opened, some with lalf-lowered steel shutters. Field. "The City of Blytheville will cooperate In obtaining adequate heavy duly access roads io the former Blythevllle Army Air Field. "The City of Blytheville will provide the necessary medical facilities for dependents of military personnel stationed at the former Blytheville Army Air Field." Get Facts About , Fistula-FREE New Book—Explains Causes and Latest Treatment Livestock NATIONAL STOCKYAHDS. 111. UP)— (OSDA)— Hogs 13,000; tairly active; weights 220 Ibs down 15 to 25 higher than Friday's average: heavier wvights and sows 25-40 higher; bulk 180-220 Ibs mostly choice Nos. 1 and 2 18.85-19.00 to shippers and hutchers; choice Nos. 1. 2 and 3 230-240 Ibs to all Interests 18.50-15; 250-270 Ibs 18.00-35; 210-300 Ibs n.50-18.00; around 350 Ibs 16.50; 150-210 Ibs 17.00-18.50; 120-140 Ibs 14.15-16.75; 100-110 Ib pigs 13.25-14.50; sows 400 Ibs down 16.00-50; heavier sows 14.00-15.50; , "2;7G C Amos Mitchell. Negro, was fined "?o and ccs'ui in MiLnicipa] Court his trifrrnin^ on a charge of leav- iti"' tlie .scene of P.:} accident. lie was charge:! with failing to st'jp hir, p.utrv obile after U had struck a parked car en East Cherry ttreel Sr/'.jrc'ay ni: - ht. IT'S FREE! 'Chevrolet Feature Show' — - Coming Soon! SuIHvan-Nelson Chevrolet Co. ;iOl West Walnut Ulytheville on re- dia- Ilhistrated, 40-page book Fistula, Piles (Hemorrhoids), luted ailments as shown in gram and colon disorders is yours FREE. Write today to Thornton & Minor Hospital, Suite 1372, 911 E, Lin wood, Kansas City, 3, Mo. Dinners And Planters have your Cotton Planting Seed Machine Delinted Cereson M Liquid Treated* • Afr Cleaned O Screened & Air Graded BAGS wmm SEWED Act Now! PKOMl'T SKRVICK — UP-TO-DATE FACILITIES. Arid lo your profits by *<irly germination; elimination of faulty seeds; no damping off or wilt; HO planter choke-ups; earlier maturity; increases final yield of linl cotton per acrt. * New "Slurry Method" Blytheville Delinting Corp. Highway 61 So. Blythevillo, Ark. Phones 2860-2976 Just around the corner 1952 FORD FOR SALE! Calcium Ammonium N ; 4- *. -^ 4- xv 20i PER CENT IT rate NITROGEN • For Information and Pric«, Calt WEST MEMPHIS COTTON OIL MILL WEST MEMPHIS, ARK. Phon« West Memphis, 84 Phone Memphis, 6-4040

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