Abilene Reporter-News from Abilene, Texas on April 1, 1970 · Page 35
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Abilene Reporter-News from Abilene, Texas · Page 35

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Wednesday, April 1, 1970
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Pirnf«/-JLwl by James McAfee iHiH AWARE OF the apparent need for help in the kicking department, Coach Wally Bullington. and his ACC staff have made every effort to fill the gap. p. Bullington is optimistic about the kicking game now after landing a pair of talented schoolboy punters and picking up a transfer with a golden toe. Punters Averaged Over 42 Yords Among the 21 new recruits are Rodney Holton of High Springs, Fla. and Gene Roberts of Hooker, Okla. They had 42.9 and 42.6 punting averages as high school seniors. "In the kicking game, a freshman can help you a lot quicker than in any other phase of the game," Bulling- Ion menlioned. With both Bob Bearden and Mike Melton gone, Sonny Kennedy is the heir apparent as the club's place- kicker. He played freshman football at Southern State in Magnolia, Ark. before transferring to ACC at midterm. He was 14 of 14 on PAT attempts and added three field goals last season. . "I feel like he can be a great placckicker," the ACC head pointed out. "I feel like the kicking game is even more important in our type of pro offense," Bullington added. Passing as much as we do, we sometimes find ourselves needing a good punt in order to gel good field position. "In addition, our pro offense is going to offer more opportunities for field goals." The Wildcats start spring training Thursday, but Bullington won't really get a chance to work on the punting game as the schoolboys don't report until August. However, he'll get a firsthand look at Kennedy and four other transfers, who'll join 31 returning lettermen. The other newcomers are David .England, a 6-1, 215- pound offensive guard from Fresno City Jr. College, Calif.; Don Hair, a spsedy tailback from the College of the Sequoias, Calif.; Randy Culver, 200-pound tight end from Cisco; and Joe Coffman, a 21 S - p o u n d defensive tackle from Harding. "As a rule we don't get junior college b o y s , ' ' Bullington said. "But we feel those boys are the type that will help us quickly." In looking back the recruiting efforts, Bullington feels real good about the 21 signees. "Looking at it on paper, il looks go," he explained. Besides the two promising punlers, four of the other recruits were from out of state. They are Mike Baysinger, a 230-pound tight end from California; Wolfgang Halbig, a 200-pound linebacker from Dyess by way of Florida and Coffey- vi!!e Jr. College; Jimmy Pearson, a 225-pound tackle from Gainesville, Fla. and Clyde Powers, an alt-stale negro tailback from Lawton, Okla. Bullington will know more about it after the spring drills end, but he's optimistic about next season as he should be with most of the players back from a fine S-2 season. "I feel like we'll be improved and could be a great team," he said, "but we do have a stronger schedule, too." Will ACC add an llth game? Bullington doesn't think so now. "we had some chances, but didn't feel they would be one that we wanted," he noted. The fact ACC's open date is near the end of the season was part of the scheduling problem. Schayes New NBA Coach At Buffalo By MAHVIN R. PIKE BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) Dolph Schayes, who made every National Basketball Association playoff in his 18 years as a player or coach, became coach Tuesday of the new Buffalo NBA team, Schayes, 41, supervisor of the league's game officials since I9fij, was appointed by the jteam's president, Carl Scheer, who until recently had been the NBA's assistant commissioner. Eddie Donovan, who resigned By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Cline and pitcher Mike Wegener as general manager of the New YANKS WIN AGAIN Hart, Allison Among Dropouts TOM SEAVER . . . the stopper JERRY KOOSMAN . . . ca imprive GIL HODGES a prophet What Next For Miracle Mets? ST. (AP) One of a Scries By JACK HAND PETERSBURG, Fla After the amazing sue cess of Uie 1969 New York Mets, Gil Hodges is retiring as a baseball prophet. 'I told the newspapermen we'd win 85 games," recalled Hodges. "Kverybody knows we won 100. When you miss by 15 games it's time to quit." Nobody was happier than Hodges to have his spring forecast fall short. At the time his prediction of 85 was a daring step. Until last season no Met team had come close lo .500 ball. 'I really felt we became a ball club when he went on that 11-game winning streak in May (actually May 28 to June 10). We started out five games under .500 and ended up six over and never dropped below again. "During that streak the boys developed confidence in themselves and started to play together. When a club catches fire like that and gels that little spark there is no way of telling how far they can go." Veterans Jim Ray Hart and Bob Allison were among baseball's cutdown casualties Tuesday while, in exhibition play, Minnesota fell victim to a new version of the New York Yankees' old late-inning thunder. San Francisco shipped Hart, an injury-plagued slugger who averaged nearly 30 home runs per year from 1964 through 1968, to the minors and Minnesota asked waivers on Allison, one of three original Twins still wilh the club, as major league teams continued to pare their rosters toward the regular season 25- man limit. Meanwhile, at Orlando, Kla., the resurgent Yankees exploded for'eight runs in the ninth inning --rookie Johnny Ellis starting the rally with a double and capping it with a three-run homer on the disabled list. Cline recently underwent an appendectomy and Wegener is recovering wa s "our first choice to guide from surgery on his right elbow. Back on the exhibition front, Philadelphia outlasted St. Louis 12-11 despite a five-run CardinaljSchayes gave Buffalo as strong uprising in the ninth inning.( a combination of top personnel Ex-Cards Byron Browne, with:j n the front office as any team four RBI on a double and triple, and Tim McCarver, wilh three hits, paced (he Phillies' attack. --for a Twins. 9-2 victory over the It was the 15th victory in 22 spring games for the Yanks, rebuilding after five consecutive also-ran finishes in the American League. Hart, who batted .254--28 points below his career average --and hit just three homers for San Francisco last season while troubled by a shoulder Injury, was sent to Phoenix of the Pa cific Coast League as the Giants reduced their roster to 28 with nine squad cuts. Leon Wagner, another former slugging s'ar, also \vas sent out. The Twins cut 11 players, Including pitcher Dick Woodson, and requested waivers on Alii son, a 35-year-old outfielder who has belted 255 homers in 12 major league seasons. If he is unclaimed by midnight Thursday, he can be given an un condition a I release. Atlanta reached the 25-man limit by optioning pitcher Gary Neiba'tter to Richmond of the In (ernattonal League and St. Lou|s ·:. released pitcher Dick Hughes, who signed with their ArkarisasVfarni club as a coach, and- sent pitcher Jerry' Johnson and outfielder .Lee Thomas (o Tulu of the American Association; Montreal placed outfielder Ty York Knicks to take a similar position with Buffalo, told ?. news conference that Schayes the team." Scheer said he believed that the combine of Donovan and EXHIBITION LINESCORES By The AiMcMf4 Prtst Al Laxelano, Fla. IAPI Boston . . ______ . . OM 000 000-- i m the NBA. Schayes was a star center at New York University before beginning his pro career with the )ld Syracuse Nationals in 1948. f{e played 15 years with Syracuse before the club moved to Philadelphia for trie 1963-64 season. . 001 600 01 X-- 8 13 0 Psvlellehi Kilken- man (7). Timmtrman (9) and Cutp. Slange «) and Pavlellch; Klllcei ,y, Schiri "' - '"' . . . Boston, PavltllOi; Detroit, Maddox, Ka- Al Brncienlon, Fla. New York N ... 000 020 010--3 4 Pittsburah 300 422 llx--13 15 _ Sadecft, Koon« 14) and Bobb; Walker, i (!) and J. L--Satfeckl. Clemente, Kebwr. At Tarnpa, Fla. Ib (7). \ [ItsburBl Geishirl House (B) .010010000--2 7 1M 003 OOX--J 10 Hemend* (6)^ Noreiga (7), and Plummer, rtibte ttt Car- OM 010 000--1 000 200 Mx-5 roll. McGForhlin O5, Granger (f) ard Cor- rates. W--WcGtalnlln. L--Hamertd«i. -Al West Palm Bescfi, Fla. Kansas city Montreal . _ . _ _ . _ _ . . , _ . Butler And Rldrjguei; RenXo* Stron- maycr (7), McGinn [9 and Brand, Bateman [9. VI-- Renko. L--Sutler, At Orljr.rto, Fla. New YorX (A) 000 010 001-- 12 e Minnesota .. .. 000 010 100--2 a ' Kcklch, Aker (SI and Munson; Kaal Hall ID, Getnard W, Barber («) am Mltrerwald. W--Aktr. L--Mall HR-Nfv, At St. Petersburg, Fla. Philadelphia ..OX it 145-1! i; } ..... Palmer, Jam« ], M. Jackson I son (9):»nd AkCarv*ri Carliton, ..... tU Nv» II), Parker (I), oilman (9) and Torre. W-Palmer. .1--Carlelen HR-SI. Camp!] (9) an At Ser»scjt«, Fla. Washington .... ...... loo 930 100-- J ...... Dukes, Pint'(4), StwIKnluc* (71 and French, Caunova (Hi Wynna,. secrlsl len'ack. Hft--Washington, Grl v'e. At TMnptV.Arlz. California r «H 000 COO-4 10 iuttl* ...\ COO MO Oil-- 3 * . Murphy, eix*n (I) md Aibui Piltln, locker li] and McNtrtntl. W-Murphy. L-Patlln. '· Chlcaon ftit-*'.'..:'... »» (00 110^7 1J 1 0«'.:ai.d ... · 0»3}| MK-13 13 3 Cturun, AlxrnaMy 131, Aiulrre til, Rjflan 17) and Rudolph; Downing, GrJnl 17) and Kancy. W-Downlng. L-Agulrrt, HR--ChIeaoor N lHfnan, Wllliami; Oakland, MlrKfitf, lifHt.- . · At Tudon, Arlf. ' . ·' . ' sun Bint M on ta-t n i Ctevtland .......... «0 IM tee-l j j I (M an« aim. w-Ctrklni. L The Mets, of course, went all the way. Although they trailed the Chicago Cubs by 9Vi games Aug. 13 they won going away by eight games. They polished off Atlanta in three straight to take the pennant and beat back Baltimore in a five-game World Series. "You can sense a different attitude," said Hodges, "not that there wasn't a good attitude in camp here in 1968 and 1969. But now they have more confidence in themselves. They feel they are good." Hodges realizes he will face challenges tie room for improvement. "Our chance is as good as anyone's," said Hodges. "I think we should be contenders. Certainly we can win it all. It remains to be seen whether we will. Chicago, St. Louis and Pittsburgh are real contenders.' 1 Hodges shrugs off any who talk of complacency or fat cat attitude among a group of kids who just have their first taste of big money and the accompanying fame. "There is room for improvement and I think the boys know it," he said. "Offense is where we can improve the most. Fellows like lion Swoboda, Ed Kranepool, Jerry Grote and Bud Harrelson can do better because they all have done better in the past. , . "It would be hard to see where Tom Seaver could be better after winning 25. But Jerry Koosman can do better. Last spring he had a sore shoulder down here and didn't really ge going until June but stai won 17 Gary Gentry should be better in his second year. Nolan Ryan may be just ready to move in as a big pitcher. Jim McAndrew can do better. Don Cardwell did just fine for us ant! should be just as good. And we have add ed Ray Sadecki, another left hander." Joe Foy is the big new face on the Mets. The third baseman who was acquired from Kansa City for Amos Otis and Bob Johnson, was a regular on Bos ton's 1967 pennant winners. His American League hacfcgrotmr. shows power and base-stealing speed. With Foy at third in place o Ed Charles, now retired, the Infield will have Kranepool 01 Doim Clendenon at first, Ken Boswell at second and Harrelson at short. Al Weis and Wayne Garrett will be the reserves. Cleon Jones appears ready lo make another stern challenge for the batting title. Tommie Agee expects another big year HPC Signs Two Cagers BROWNWOOD (RNS) Howard Pa.vne College Head Basketball Coach and Athletic in center. Swoboda Shamsky take care and Art of righ Held, depending on tlie enemy pitching. Crrpte will be backed up b rookie Randy Bobb and younj Duffy Dyer on a three-mar catching staff. Bobb was ac quired from tlie Cubs for veter an receiver J. C. Martin. AT A GLANCE 1969 tlnlsri--World champions and p nant winners. Took Material League e_ by eight games wilh 100-42 record, bea A.lanla for pennant in Ihre* straight an 1 ' ' e In " . then won S«rJ« from fiailfrnor jamej. S1r*r»g[h--One-two pitching punch c ·ighr-handed Tom Scaver, 25-flsm* win tier and cy Young Award Winner, »rx feft-harxfcrf J«rry Xocsnrttn, etc filler) catcher In Jerry Grate. Batting pUrtch In Clton Jon«£, Tommle A0M ana Don Clftnd«non, Good bench. Weakness--Slit] « Itille ;hctl m hiHIn- Strength. Frequent military duty by Ke Boswe|l and Bud Harrclson force inflel shuttles at awkward times. New faces--'re Foy, acquired from Foy, acq I be ben Director Glen Whitis has announced the signing of two basketball players from Texas high schools to pre-enrollment applications. The two are Phillip Alan Perry, 6-6 postman from Grapc-j vine High School, and James' Ted Averitt, 6-5 player from Hart High School. Perry, 200 - pound son of Robert R. Perry of Grapevine, filled a vine record this past season. Perry, who a game and Kansas City, snould b» beil third bass mah In club's history. Ray Sadeckl, «x Giant, adds experienced lefty fo pflcnfn , pflcnfn . Probable flnlsn-- Fighting with Cards Cubs and Pirates fo League Ing t line Naliona THE ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS i? l AbUene. Texas, WedMtday Mtralic, April 1, Itn \3*f\ 100, HURDLES, WEIGHTS CHANGE Three Emerge as New Area Track Leaders By WALLY SIMMONS Executive Sports Edllar Some of the events weren't hanged at all, but others were Completely revamped on the hart of top track and field per- in the Big Country ormances Ms week. Events such as the 220 and 440 vere left pretty much the same, vhile the 100 - yard dash men, mrdlers and w e i g h t m e n ihanged the rankings in their event completely. When it was over, three new eatlers had emerged, two mproved on their performances which were already best in the area and still another gained a 'ie for first place. PAUL PIERCE and Jon ihiddlehoover of Cooper and )on Brown of Abilene High were 'he performers moving to tlie op of the chart. Pierce became the new leader n the mile with a 4:;!B2 clock- ng, passing Danny Smart of Big Spring. Rhiddlehoover got to the top by sailing the discus 162-1, while .eammate Bob Reeves claimed second with 161-1. Herbert Hodges of Snyder dropped to third although his new best of 152-6 would have been first a week ago. Aiblene High's Don Brown lashed to a 14.3 in the high hurdles to pass Ronnie Robertson of Graham as the best in the area He also came close to Robertson n the intermediates with a 38.9 clocking. Terr)' Jones of Abilene High solidified his hold on third in the highs with a 14.7 and over ihird in the intermediates with 40.0. COLORADO CITY'S sprint sensation, Stan Bracy, lowerec lis top mark in the 100 to 9.6 in :he preliminaries at Vernon ftobcrt Bolden of Hamlin, Alan Swagerty of Cooper aiid Mike Brooks of Abilene High all clocked 9.8 and Herman Evans of Big Spring turned in a 9.9 to nan almost matched (he leaders Mike Glover of Cooper In the n the pole vault with a 12-9 ef- ort and Sherman Roberts of Abilene High moved onto the list in the 880 with a 2:01.1 clocking. OTHERS gaining a spot on the ._.,. ,, chart included Mark Jones of Abilene High and Cooper trad; Jig Spring in the mile, Ricky Culver of Cooper in the high lurdles, Jimmy Teslon of Swectwater in the shot, and discus. Jan Brown of Brownwood almost overhauled C-City's Bracy in the 229, flashing to a 223 clocking, just a 10th of a second off the lead. Most of the changes involved sters because they've been in two meets since the last listing and most weekend meets were plagued with bad weather. BIG COUNTRY'S BESTS Stan Bracy, Colorado City Alan 5wag#rtv- Coopw Mlxe Broods, Abilene Robert Bolden, Hamlln Herman Evans/ Bio Spring Bob Srwdgrais, Coleman 2» Stan Bracy, Colorado City 9.4 ! c '·S'A John Houston, Sweetwater Robert Bolden, Harnlfr. Jeff Keeper, Abilene 3111 Weller, Brownwood Larry Williams, Sweetwater Dan Cobb, Abilene Hlflh Brian Duncan, Graham M . J. Lnlt. Abilene High Paul Pierce. Cooper Sherman Roberts, A Brenl Arnortf, Seymour Mike Harwell, Abilene High MILE Paul Pierce. Cooper a anny Sn ike Wai: Smart, Bis SnriTM , flta Sprin , Abilene High j Sweetwater ?HS Mark Jonas, Big Sprlni "»IHI J Don Brown, Abilene Ronnie Robertson. Graham leery Jones, Abilene Rkky Culver, Cooper Allon Pierce, Wlnfers 1» INTERMEDIATES Ronnie Robertson, Gr*h»m Don BrcM.fi, Abilene Terry Jones, Abilene '-"n Paige, Abilene ry Allen, SnytJer High 9.8 9.8 ?.9 Yl.Z . M 3 aw 22.7 ,. ;:,8 so.s 5.0 SI .5 51,5 3:00.1 , 2:C0.5 ?:OU 2:01.6 r\ .... 2:03.1 4:36.2 4:39.3 4:«.0 er ... 4:«U,Q 4:45.1 14.3 U.S 14 J 15.0 15.1 ATES i MJ -.,..'. 40.0 *a.7 40.9 Big Spring ,, B rownwood MltE RELAY AbHfne Swwtwiter Mike Brooks, Abilene High Robert Bolden, Htmlln Don Brown/ Ablftne Leon McXnfehjt* Snydir HIGH JUMP Mike Brooks, Abilene High Richard Albui, Monday Danny Frailer, Aspermorvl Dennis Lovell, Cooper SHOT Carl Devorce, Colorado City Victor Cailtsom Ablicna Terry Springer, Cooper Perry Thompson, Sweetwaler Jimmy Teston, Sw**1 water DISCUS Jon Rhiddlehoover, Cooper Bob Reeves, Cooper Herbert Hodges. Snyder Mike Glower, Cooper Jimmy Teshjfl, Sweetwiler POLC VAULT Ricky Schwarz, Cooper Ton Collins, Coleman Bllt Whtraker, Abilene High Mark Gllsh-ap, Snvder . . . ' .. 3-1 ..': .. 3: .. 22.. « '. Jl- .. S5 .. » .. 52 .. 4? .. 49 ... ! ... 1 . 152 . 147 ... 1 ','" *.» 43.0 43.0 U.t U.I Milwaukee Bucks Love Philadelphia By RALPH BERNSTEIN lhave to play tough defense to PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The ! prevent them from playing their Milwaukee Bucks love Philadelphia. Why not? The Bucks have been here five times this basketball season and have yet to lose. The Bucks beat the Phtladel- make that the cutoff point in the|? hia 76crs Iour toes here du . r listings. Abilene High's Jeff Keeper Iil a S ain Monday night e 440 leader, lowered his fm, t h l r d g ame °f u 'e Natioi the 440 leader, lowered his top mark from 50.6 to 50.5. Hobby Stevens of Cooper tied teammate Hicky Schwarz for :he lead in the pole vault with a 13-0 effort. There were some other impres- 3-1 lead sive efforts that failed to over- scries. Jing the regular season. They did in the National Bas- ketbaj; Association's Eastern Division semifinal playoffs. If Milwaukee can do it again Wednesday night the Bucks will jhead home with a commanding in the best-of-seven haul the leaders. Victor Callison of Abilene High closed the gap on Carl Devorce They'd be a cinch, right? Wrong! Ironically, Die 76ers hold a 2-1 offensive game." Neither coach plans any changes. The 76ers will go with Billy Cunningham and Jim Washington up front, Darrall Imhoff at center and Hal Greer and Wally Jones at the guards. Cunningham, their big scorer, hit lor only 10 points Monday night. Milwaukee, ol course, will lea- lure Ata'ndor at center, with ·lynn Robinson and Jon Mc- "Hocklin, a 24-point scorer in ;ame three, in the backcourt and Greg Smith and Bob Dandridge at forwards. Alcindor shot 13 for 16 from the field Monday night. He sat out the last 14 minutes of the rout. ot Colorado City with a 53-3i4! re B uIar . season edge over the shot heave. Tony Cullins of Cole- Kuhn to Announce on Me La* NEW YORK (AP) - Baselialllsioner's office. [Tuesday night he will announce per contest, twice was named to all tournament teams and was also an all district selection. Scholastically, he had a "B 1 average. Averitt, 210-pound son of Ted his decision Wednesday in the would hold a news conference at' Buc ks' Coach Larry Costello the Americana Hotel at 12 noon fel( h 's team fina "y P la y ed 'he EST, Wednesday to announce ame il is capable of. He said pitcher Denny McLain. "I don't know anything about what the decision is," said McLain, reached in Florida Tuesday night. The star pitcher said he had been informed that the Averitt of Hart, a r a g e d ,8 decision would be announced by points a game with the Hart|Kuhn in a long distance tele- ' iphone call from the commis- leam. Milwaukee Waits For Pilots, But... By DION HENDERSON MILWAUKEE (AP) - Milwaukee is waiting for baseball the way you'd wait for your rich mother-in-law to decide whether she wants to come and live with you--with mixed emotions. You don't say much, because anything you say might be held against you. But you get the place tidied up and maybe put a few six-packs in ice. In Milwaukee, beer is for celebrating, but you can cry in it too. past four summers, when the White Sox weren't visiting. That means a few things just possibly have been done to get ready, but you couldn't prove it by anything anyone says officially. You could get more operational details out of a Russian submarine commander Uian you can out of the Brewers. Uniforms for instance. Uniforms? Urn, yes. Nobody can say about uniforms. But there is a pin stripe model with a script 'Brewers" on it hanging in a The Milwaukee Brewers Base- downtown sporting goods supply ill Plllk I w r t tr. fir- MA».,A,,n »\o . * * * ball Club, Inc., is as nervous as a bridegroom. It is made up of industry and like that, used to making without important batting an decisions eye. But their heads ache when a fly stomps across the ceiling these days, and il you say good morning to one of them he will say, "No comment." The baseball season opens a week from' today, and it is entirely possible that it will open In Milwaukee County Stadium, which has been tbout as «xclt- Ing as a haunted house for the-buys a color TV set. store. Tickets? Who would know big, important men, captains of about tickets? Nobody, that's who. But if you are standing in front of the stadium window with money In your hand and someone should announce the t° secrecy, Seattle franchise has been shifted to Milwaukee, the window will open within 11 seconds. Maybe 12, but no longer, because these Brewers are veryj efficient people. And a guy who sells appliances Is offering two box seat! for opening day to anybody who The stadium looks fine. Grass, outfield, mound, refurbished seats, concession stands. Everything is coming along, manager Bill Anderson says, about as usual. About as usual, it you are expecting 45,711 people to drop in next Tuesday, maybe. Otherwise the next scheduled major Bucks in Milwaukee. The 76ers split the first two games of the series played in [Wisconsin. I With Lew Alcindor, their 7- jfoot-1 star scoring 33 points in 133 minutes, and the team shoot- ling 58.9 percent, the Bucks blew ,the 76ers out of the Spectrum IMonday night 156-120. Milwau- ikee led by as much as 54 points. A spokesman for the commis-.Tte '^rs simply appeared over- sioner said here that Kuhn matched. , his decision, which was reached ^1, Bu _ cks . " " sometime Tuesday. McLain, at Lakeland, Philadelphia's press and mnved Hie ball. "We kept the court spread out so they couldn't double on us," told newsmen he had advance Costello explained. . plans to be away from his rent- Much of the Milwaukee sue- w u d c e s s g e . ! · . _ ! ? h not be available for comment'giiard Flynn Rnbinson. who had until late in the day--regardless'U assists. Robinson finally un- of the decision. ihitched himself from 76ers' Asked if he wanted time to ^ Wall , y . Jones ani ? did a jo |? ""' playmakJng. He also scored points. Philadelphia Coach J a c k "compose himseU" in case the^ Pi ay T a Kuhn decision is adverse, Me- ^-P 011115 Lain replied: "Yes, that's part GLOBETROTTERS IN SNYDER SNYDER -- The west unit of the Harlem Globetrotters will make an appearance here Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in the Scurry County Coliseum. Tickets will be $2.50, $3 and $3.50 with a $1 off for children under 12. talk right away." djd (1]e capaciljr ctwd Qf ^u. McLain repeated an earlier "We played a poor game," he statement that he would be said- "We'll come back Wednes"ready to pitch right away" if^ay and play our game. We reinstated. "I've been working' out and my stuff is pretty good." A Detroit newspaper reported last week that McLain would be given a year's suspension for involvement in bookmaking activities dating back to 1967. The commissioner's office, however, described that report as "just a wild guess" and said Hester Inks Pact With ABA Rockets DENVER (AP) - The Denver Rockets of the American Basketball Association signed Danny Hester of Louisiana State University to a contract Tuesday. ,M » nB « s TM»' ue o n«J° r Kuhn had not come to a deci- V mversi 'y lo a contract Tuts- athletic contest in the ball yard! s j nn d a y . on the banks of the Menomoneel McLajn, a 26-year-old right- Hes 'er was a teammate of is Aug. 15, when the Green Bay]hander, won 31 games in 1968i" pisl01 Pclc " Maravich, the Packers expect to play the Chl-jand led the Tigers to the Ameri- leading scorer in college basket- cago Bears in a National Foot- can League pennant. He won b a" this year. He was the Rock- ball League exhibition. So you might guess that a . things have been done in pre- shared (he award last year with . -- , - * Unit I mrtr ··'· Vf(lr_ PllAl In.. r,tt^^ ]the Cy Young Award as ' i outstanding pitcher and EVINRUDE MOTORS S01D IN THE ABIifNl A«A CM- RY A 2 TEAK FACTORY WARRANTY IF SOU) BY THE FISHING VILLAGE MARINA, Inc. Auriiorfxt4 Evjnrud* takr for 25 THE Great Imperial BEST BUY IN PLEASURE FairTnd* 5/33« PLUS TAX If ANY GO KING EDWARD M LtrgiH tfltlnf Clftr paration. There may be ushers, and parking attendants and concessionaires hired and sworn smuggled in, and and bratwursts even such Baltimore's Mike Cuellar after posting a 24-9 record. ·But McLain was suspended Indefinitely by Kuhn last month an Investigation things as season ticket orders addressed and ready (or the m ? ; ,, . Ipenslon was "based substantial- But you'll never know, if noth- )y w certain adm | SSlMS m , de ing happens. Milwaukee has candidly to me by Mr. McLain counted too many chickens that and not on allegations In a re- ··.AUIifefJ- klktMluuJ t A n4*l*l AAMi.1i_M _. i · , ~ .. . wring two box state never hatched to start cackling cent magulne juilcle many of r ri.» i« ,nvk«*, ,,,« . roost. they come home to which unfounded. 1 els' No. 6 choice in the draft of SUIT SALE · CHARM · SlUC'n WOOL SUIT REG. $12) R.g. $135. Big Mtn'l «»i 444*40. .«. « Uflg. J M ClouJa Y*v*« Oa»n Wad., Thru Ft). H!M 'HI ' p/n. FACTORY SUIT CENTER WOOL SHARKSKIN SUIT COUMFUl ENSEMBLE

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