The Oneonta Star from Oneonta, New York on October 12, 1959 · Page 8
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The Oneonta Star from Oneonta, New York · Page 8

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Oneonta, New York
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Monday, October 12, 1959
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Page 8
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8 Oneonta Star Mon., Oct. 12,1959 Wool Runs Style Gamut Officers Once Wealthy Aristocrat Installed · Found Greater Rewards In Hartwick In Being Social Director GLAMOR AFTER F I V E . . . This is called the Jean Harlow suit, designer to add festivity to the cocktail hour. It is in nubby beinp ·\merican wool w i t h p l a t i n u m blonde fox" collar that ties g r a c e f u l l y at the neckline. The tapered skirt has a bark pleat for walking ease. DAYTIME S W A G G E R . . . A f a v o r i t e ' f o r all ages is this expensive-looking but moderately priced beige woolen polo coat. The lush fabric is warm enough for all-winter wear, the casual lines are right f o r - t o w n , country or campus. Wear it belied or unbelted to suit your mood. Richfield Springs DAR Hears Pastor RIC1IF1KLD SPRINGS - Talk on "Faith of Our Fathers", a topic chosen ly tho National Society of DAR, was presented by the Rev. Horace A. del Pozzo at the meeting of Ganowau- ges Chapter. DAR. with -Mrs. George Oliver in Warren. Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, spoke of his deep appreciation for all that America means, to him. which was early instilled in him by his parents, who came here from foreign shores, when they were o n l y IS years old. His closing thought was thai "Our Faith Must Always Be ill Cod." Mrs. George Foster the regent presided with Mrs. Lewis A. Williams in charge of opening rituals. Mrs. Oliver presented the socretarv's report. Miss Madeline L'lwood road a report on approved schools by Mrs. Lyle Howland of Homo, past national chairman of approved schools and presently state vice-regent. Miss Klwood then asked that a'.l articles for the annual clothing drive for the DAR schools, bo left at her home by November 1. "Chapter observed Constitution Week with a trip to the Old Stone Fort at Scholia rie. now a museum [or historical records. Mrs. Claude Robinson, who reported on the trip, discovered deeds of members of the Vrooman [amily. of which M r s . Robinson and several chapter members are descendants. Six chapter members also attended the Central New York Round Table meeting held i u West Winfiold and heard Otsrgo County Judge, Frederick Ixwmis speak on -the fifth amendment. Invitations were announced for the following: October 1-1. round table meeting at Herkimer Reformed Church, reservations to bo made with the rogom. Mrs. Foster anil from :ao T:".iniar.'- burg Chapter, at Noyos Lodge on the Cornell C'nmpi 1 .- 5 . w h e r e me .--.He regent. Mrs. M'.ink B- Cult, will address the group. Episcopal Women h'-'d Meeting R I C H F I E L D S P R I N G S -St. John's Service League met w i l h Mrs. Albert Druse, with Mrs. Miohael Androski. presiding. The R e v . Daniel T. Hill opened the meeting with prayer. Mrs. Louis Lent gave the treasurer's report. The presi- d e n t . appointed -|he following committees f o r t h e a n n u a l Sunday School Hallowe'en p.irty to bo held in the parish house October 30th: Refreshments. Mrs. Androski and Mrs. Pulaski B. Cttlbort: decorations, Mrs. Druse, Mrs. Andrew G. Curric and volunteers frr;n ihe Junior Choir; enter- t a i n m e n t for I b e younger children, Mrs. Euffeiie Hecox, Mrs. Lenl and Mrs. Frank Skuhil?.: and for the older children, the rector and Mrs. R u f u s Pope. Mrs. Androski also appointed a committee to sponsor a Corporate Communion Breakfast for Ihe young people of the parish, to be bold on All Saints Day November 1. comprising Mrs. Skubi!?., Mrs. Druse and Mrs. Culbei't wilh Mrs. Androski, assisting. Mrs. Currio will bold the November 10. m o o t i n g at her Park Street home w i t h the president as assistant bosicss. Mrs. Daniel T. Hill, member of the Service League, represented St. John's parish at the Albany Episcopal Diocesan C o n v e n t i o n in the Cathedral of All Saints t h i s past week. Also a t t e n d i n g w i l h Mrs. Hill were Faibor H i l l . Mrs. Clarence B y i n q t r m and Miss Bessie Thompson. A Lovelier You Bv M a r y Sue Miller ROASTING POULTRY Some cooks like to use a Hat rack when roasting poultry. If you dn this, tip the bird so one side uf the breasl rests on the rack, then midway through tiio roasting period, turn iho bird and rest the other sido of the breast on the rack. F R E N C H TOAST If you add a l i t t l e sugar to the ess and milk m i x t u r e for French toast, you'll f i n d the bread w-i!l brown well when you fry i:. Some folks like the French toast seived w i t h s p r i n k l i n g of cinnamon mixed maple syrup, others go for a with s u p e r f i n e sugar. Noted Many Women Have Graying Hair II is sad but Into -- many voting women have gray in their blonde, chestnut, auburn or raven tresses. A survey of beauty ship at- londance shows (S per cent of the women questioned admitted some degree of gray in the natural color of their hair. Surprisingly, 31 per c e n t of them are under 35. Science has not furnished all the answers to the gray hair question, and there' are many theories connected with tho parly appearance ot gray in the hair. Almost everyone agrees that there are dietary factors i n - volved. but that is not the entire ansuor. Young men who went off to the wars returned with B great deal of gray in the hair in some instances, anil many of them came from families where llip top knots oi father and mother had not yet grayed. Since many young girls do not go to beauty parlors the survey, conducted through a national maga/ine hy John H. Brock, nn expert in hair preparations, may have shown oven a smaller percentage of gray than must exist in this under-r group. Eighty - two percent of those between .".1 and M had some gray hair, and % per cent of those over n5 had gray hair, the survey showed. K,-tc'n section of the United Sinios was included in the stirvpy to insure statistical accuracy. Tho .-survey showed :S per cont reported to hair coloring, o f which b7 per cent had the "rinse" typo. IT per com the permanent type and 12 per cent used a color shampoo. Other facts reported in the survey: 1. Forty-one per cent of the women depend on their beauticians to suggest iho hair style that is best suited to them. 2. One stylo has been worn for life l» 13 per cent of the women. 3. The short hair stylo i ; preferred by !!' per CPU', of women. 4. Less than -5 per cent oi all HAP.TWICK -- Diego Valley Rehckah 1/xlge served a dinner in honor of district deputy president Nora Marriott and her staff from Unadilla Forks. Chairman of the dinner committee was Mrs. Howard Marlette, with Ihe Mmos. Hose Shepard Glen Hairt-'O:!, Susie Phillips. Ralph Weens, and Mcnzo Balcom assisting. Tables were decorated in autumn motif. Lodge opened with noble grand. Agatha Harrington presiding. Following members were installed by (lie deputy president and her staff. They were the Mines. Waldo Potter, noble grand; Lena Pas-no, vice-grand; Fred Gill, financial secretary; Susie Potter, treasurer; Jennie Bunn, chaplain: Rose Shepard, conductor; and Miss Rose Shephard and Thelma Buna, warden. Also installed were the Mmos. Harold Beach. RSNG; George Kookiiout: LSNC: Howard Mark-no RSVG; .Siit-ie Piiiihps. HA .Supporter: John Molt, f l a g bearer: Mon/.o Balc.im, musician; and Gertrude Morse, inside guanl: and the .Misses P e a r l Weeks, I .SVG. and Gertrude GCTSI. outside guard. Mrs. Agatha Harrington wa.-, installed as past noble grand. Short talk was given by n. n. President M a r r i - i t i ;s!^ from her Deputy Marshal and Mrs. Blanche Klock, frum tost Hoikimer, who is a long time member of tile llarlwick Lodge. Flowers wore presented to the D. D. President by Thelma Bunn ai:d to the Deputy Marshal by Mrs. John Molt and Past Noble Grand Agatha Harrington by Mrs. Howard Marlctte from the lodge. It w a s announced I h e S t a t e President would make her visit to this district on .January 1!). Tbolma Bunn reported that she bad turned in over S100. from Ihe rummage sale and thanked everyone who had helped on Ihe committee, also all those w h o had contributed clothing etc. to make this a success. Cards wore signed lor members who arc i l l . A card was sent to ' M r s . Gertrude Phillips who will be 91 Tuesday. By MARK KNIGHT YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK W -- It's fun to be poor; life becomes so much more interesting and worthwhile. For 14 years their been at the ranch. Be Held To RICHFIELD SPRINGS -Experienced teacher has been located for a hookrri rug class .at Edmeslon. She can come only in the daytime on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday. If there are people who would l i k e to learn this craft, they may regisler by calling the school. Worth 58031. The course will include 12 sessions of H hours. 20 minutes, if it is scheduled. Kit Whitman knows. Her childhood in a pretentious mansion in Victoria, B. C., schooling among England's blue- bloods, and several years the wife of a wealthy Englishman, all sharply contrast to her present life as social director in a Sierra Nevada resort hotel "It really isn't as much of a contrast as it seems," says Kit. "Whether it is outfitting a pack trip into the High Sierra, directing the children's rides on burros, or arranging a bridge and tea lor the wives of convention guests, the purpose is to contribute everything possible to the enjoyment of visitors. "In the ballrooms of British Columbia, London and Hong Kong the purpose was the same. The big difference is that here we are dealing with purposeful people, whose pleasure is real and rewarding." The 200-room Ahwahnee hotel is Kit's domain. As social director, her job is to make everyone as comfortable and happy as possible. "This doesn't always entail supplying what they ask," she says." "Most of them don't exactly know what they expect from the · few days they will spend with us, so my job is as much ferreting out what they would really enjoy as providing what they request." Shortly before the World War 11 Kit abandoned what she considered a pointless nomadic life of ease among European playgrounds of the wealthy and obtained an American divorce in Reno, Nev. She waived all monetary claims. She was broke, or practically so. "The first money I ever earned," she says, "was at the Monte Cristo dude ranch on Pyramid Lake, 30 .miles from Reno. For beans, as they say, 1 w a s conducting horseback tours, taking guests to Reno, picking up laundry and supplies. Then I became hostess, teaching dudes to ride and swim and arranging their picnics. The income from a few remaining Canadian bonds provided spending money." bonds provided s p e n d i n g money." While living in Victoria Kit had summered in Carmel, Calif. She returned to visit friends, did some organizing work for charities, established a profitable business and married Colden Whitman, a hydraulics engineer. They bought 300 acres of foothills land on the Fresno River. UNICEF Plans Made Party women are natural blondes. :i. Four out oi five women have an undesirable hair or scalp condition such as dandruff, manageability and hair dryncss. 0. Eighty per cont ot women visited a beauty siiop at least once a yoar, and of these liie average number of visits was four limes a year. Older women, those in higher income groups and employed women were the most frequent customers. 7. The average amount spent per visit was S3.31 with s h a m- poos. haircuts, pcrmanents and rinses the services most ,iur- ohascd. S. Half the women surveyed had a professional permanent at least once a year at an average cost of Sll.liS. a fraction over one- quarter of tho women had a home permanent, representing n sharp decline from Ihe one - third ra- I tio of a like survey a year ago. FLY CREEK -- Mrs. Lre Winnie, Mrs. Harry- Green, Mrs. Marion Vredenburgh, Raymond McRorie, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Calhoun. M r s. Peter Martin, Mrs. Hess Talbot, Paula Michaels and Donald Vredenburgh representing (he organization of Fly Creek met at Iho church to plan for TJNICEF United Nations Children's Fund. The children of Fly Creek and the area will meet at the church, October 31 at 6:30 p.m. to be judged for their costumes and prizes will be awarded. Following the judging the children will be taken around the area and will call at the homes for "Trick or Treat" for UNICEF and thereby help all the World's Children. They will then return to the church for the usual party. The older groups will also have a party. home has _ _ first in a sleeping bag, then a tent, around which Walls gradually rose as money permitted; eventually a sturdy one-room cabin. A year after moving to the ranch Kit took a social job at Camp Curry in Yosemite and a year later moved to direct the company's social program from headquarters in the Ahwahnee. She drove the 64 mountainous miles home for weekends, summer and winter. Whitman almost single-handedly cnostructed a striking two- bedroom home on a granite outcropping overlooking- the river and valley. It has modern plumbing, its own water system; central heat and refrigerated air-conditioning. It is usod for guests, with a weekend waiting list, but soon will become their home--"After we have completed a new living room w i t h a bc.ge stone fireplace, and nn enclosed veranda." Kit remarks. Soon after they moved lo the ranch a Yosemite park concessionaire asked them to pasture a tew burros and Shetland ponies. The Whitmans fell in love with tho shaggy, stubborn, good- natured burros. They started a herd of their own. concentrating on a crossbreed of small, tough animals especially suited for children's pets. "One of these, days." says Kit, "when our construction is completed, we will settle down, enjoy our days with the burros and the evenings in front of that beautiful big stone fireplace, at home to all the wonderful friends we have made." Marriage Announced Mr. and Mrs. Glen Simmons, 19 Fonda Avenue, have announced the marriage of their daughter, Constance, to Theodore Oakly, also-of Oneonta. Both are employees of Deckers Bakory. After a Washington D. C. wedding trip the couple will reside at 406 Main Street. LAZY FROSTING Distribute thin pieces of · milk chocolate over a white cake you've just taken from tlie oven. As soon as the chocolate softens spread it smoothly, with a spatula, over the top of the cake. Lazy woman's way but good! DOWN FROM RICHES is Mrs. Kit Whitman, -who. for most of her life, lived among wealth. Now she is content as the social director of a SieVra Nevada resort hotel. As a hobby she and her husband raises burros. Presbyterian Women Ga,ther HOB ART -- Meeting of the 1st Circle of the Women's Association of the Presbyterian Church was held Wednesday evening at the home of Mrs. E. A. Burke. Mrs. Wallace Rich was leader of the study period on "The Place of the Ancient and Evan- 'gelical Churches in the Middle East" and gaVe an account of the various churches, still flourishing that date back to the first century, and spoke of the problems and jxjssibiiities in developing closer relationships with them. Devotions were led by Mrs. Charles Hoagland who took for her topic the 13th Chapter of 1st Corinthians. Mrs. C. C. ' Gould, president concluded the business meeting. Mrs. Lola Douglas was appointed secretary pro tern.'A change in the date of the Susquehanna Prcsbyteriol was announced. Following the meeting refreshments wore served-by the. hostess and assisted by Mrs. Douglas and Mrs. Claude Sands. Area Meets Lesson Home Extension Unit 2 held the last of l\vo lessons on colored aluminum trays at the W i 1 b e r Mansion Thursday. Sixteen members were present. Mrs. Wanda Parker was in charge of the session. Next class will be October 22 with fabric and plastic bag kits to be featured. EAST MEREDITH -- Home Demonstration Unit, 8, Tuesday, Fire Station; topic, "Alu- minuni Trays." BURLINGTON--Burlington Historical Society, 8, Monday, October 12, Grange Hall. Program--original paper written by Newell Talbot--"Reminiscences of Taylor Hill and vicinity." Read by Mrs. Alfred Ludington. FRANKLIN -- Grange 8:15 p.m. Tuesday. Booster night. Open meeting. DELHI -- Methodist Church women to sew today for Delhi Hospital Guild at the hospital. DELHI -- Watauga Chapter, O.E.S., 8 tonight in', Masonic Hall. DELHI -- Novus Club, with Mrs. Henry Ilovemeyei*,' .7:45, Tuesday, October 13. · IfAMDEN -- Annual pancake supper for benefit of Hamden Presbyterian Church in Fellow- · ship Hall, G Tuesday. ! \ Calendar Of Events First Baptist Church, Lang Philathea Glass, supper meeting; 6:30 tonight. JN'Iiss Lou Ella Gridley, guest speaker. HAM, 7:30 tonight, Masonic Temple; refreshments. BofRT, 7;30 tonight, Eagles Club. i Perseverance Lodge, 7:30, tonigTit, Eagles Club. Main Street Baptist : Ladies Circle Group 4, with Mrs. E. Fay Michael, 99 Center St., 2, today. Group 5 with Mrs. Frank Westcotl, North. Kortright, 7:30, tonight. V.'HY niiY H A I R ? It is said thai the- hair ii- lap .-.turdhM form of tinman tissue. This hi int so, why then do su many lucks lt- volop dry, brink' conditions? Sometimes a ph\sical disturbance is responsible. The usual cause, however, is abuse. Hair dries out from Mich abuses as unskilled coloring, excessive permanent waving and overexposure to torrid or lev ueaih- Pr. Hilt Ihe greatest offender is carelessness about day to-day treatment -- a i i n u - t ihomiiKh biiis'iinus, shampoos and runs- sages. Obviously, lo prevent or remedy dryncss, abuses n,iusl be avoided! Kor an already dam- aged head, a reconditioning program is also in order. An effective ono follows: ]. Weekly. mai-MRi' varmed tulip lanolin into scalp and then brush hair: let oil remain thirty mimitPf. Thereafter shampoo, using a lanolin or soapk-ss formula i not a dotergenU. Finish with cream rinse. ' . ' . O n c e between sham|»os. work tonic, ointment into scalp -- minimum amount. .",. Daily, surface hair w i t h pom- ado and brushs for five minutes. A f t e r several weeks of this regimen, hair takes on now sheen and ^manageability. But renewed strength and resilience require a long winter's work. I'.l.'LK FOR WAVKS? What's your hair problem? You will find a way to overcome it in my .lli - page booklet, HULK YOUR WAVKS. Advice includes: beauty treatments for oily, dry. and normal hair; ways lo manage unruly locks; how to add color and highlights; lip.s on cutting, pcrmanenls and styling; grooming tricks. Write me in crin- of Ibis newspaper for your copy, enclosing n Iftrg* 1 , self-addressed, stamped envelope and 20c in coin. When you move to town... Your Welcome Wagon Hostess will call with a basket of gifts ... and friendly preetinRfi from our religious, civic and business leaders. If you, or others you know, are moving, be sure to phone Welcome Wagon. 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It's incredibly resilient, more Mfk QC crush-resistant, long-lasting, soil-resistant, moth-proof and - P I U . / J casy-to-clean.In 8 solid-.shades-.and-4-tweed combinations, SQUARE YAW BAGG'S IVrlnd A- Modrrn FURNITURE WAYSIDE FURNITURE 387 Chestnut St. "In The West End" Dial GK 3-5370 Oneonta

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