The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 9, 1952 · Page 8
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 8

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, January 9, 1952
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Page 8
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PACE EIGHT BLTTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY fc 9* A Changes in Golf Rules Will Make Things Tougher for Us Duffers Ml my »oW elubs, Mom, I'm taking up shinny. Aft« thoroughly IHding these new golf rules there's not but one thing I haw to say— Dunk goodness I quit the game a couple o( years ago. Ttw new rule«, which went feito •Meet with th* turn of th* new jwu, aren't going to make too much ««er»nce to the links hot shots but to the poor old duffers like me they're going to make us lose what little religion we have left. While it is agreed that t uniform •ode wu needed for the sport, It Is our humble opinion that the boys who write the rule books «ort of overdid themselves. For the Bunday afternoon dudes who have trouble hitting their long shot* (any that travel over 50 yards In our ens*) itraight, the new rules are downright criminal. Tor instance, under the new rules t golfer now gets penalized both a ttroke and distance when he hits out of bounds. Formerly, all he lost was distance. Here's a nutshell summary of the new rules as we interpret them: Wrong bull—Playing a stroke with any wrong ball except in a hazard call* from the loss of » hole in match play or two strokes In stroke play. Dropping a ball improperly calls for a one-stroke penalty and if a bal| at rest is moved by an opponent, his caddie or any equipment means a penalty stroke for the opponent. Out of bounds—Penalty increased to stroke and distance. A clearer Interpretation would be this: On a lo*t or out of bounds ball, return nearest .the «pot from where you htt.the ball and add one stroke. In other, words, after'an out-of-bounds tea shot you would be shooting three on your drive. TJnjitmymble ball—You have an op Hon here. You can either return to the *pot from where you last hi and add a penalty stroke or ym ten drop a ball behind the unplay able He and add two strokes. Ca.v vet water, ground under repair, holi made by burrowing animal: yoi maf lift and drop the bill wlthou petMlfcy. hi IM«W«—H-a b»B BM hi or touches coeuel water, ground under yepaar or a hole, ca.it a runwa made bf a burrowing antmal yoi may IMt and drop.the ball wlthou penaMf M near ae possible to th •pot wticre H lajr but not nearer the hole.' Or, under penalty of on »trc*e, yo« may drop the ball outride the hfrtard but not nearer th he*. '•::.. !•"*•« afcoHshed—When th • the hole He* on putttn reen, tt may be lifted, If either layer considers that It might In- erfere with or assist a player. (This ule 1* unchanged as far as most curses are concerned as stymies were not enforced except in some ases, in tournament play.) Club*—None of the 14 clubs pcr<- nlssable in a golfer's bag may be sorrowed from any other person jlaying the course. These are the major rules langes. Ttiere are others, such as he size of the ball and the con- tructlon of clubs but they arc mainly changes to eliminate differences previously existing between JSOA and British regulations. last Chicks and Paps Sweep Doubleheader from Paragould Tribe Smothers Bulldogs 71-37; Juniors Win 32-23 PARAGOULD—Blytheville's senior Chicks and junior 'apooses dealt the Paratfould Bulldoga a douhle blow here ast night, sweeping both ends of a basketball double header. * port * In Spurt* Remember the argument of year about who ivas hnsohnlVfi grrales* hlffer, Ty Cobn or Hal* Ruth? Well, We* Dlrkle Kcrr, tlie ex-Blyth«villfan of Chicago Black So* fame nays neither was. Kfrr, now In retirement at Houston, Tex., In an Associated Press Interview the other day rust his rote for his former tram mate, the late. Shoeless Joe Jackson and RoK*m Homshy, . . . "Jackson war probably (he best natural hit- ler who ever lived," Krrr .said. "T never saw htm fooled hy a pitch not even lo thrw* days when they were throwing him the shine hall, the spit ball and the mud ball, which were legal then." . . , Jackson, incident Jy, played semi -pro baseball here after he was bannrd from organized baseball for life for allegedly being Involved In the Black S«x scandal. . . . Dutch (Nttway Laundry) Quellmalr can remlnI)K« a boat those rood old days. ... Clarence Wilson, the tanky Os- oeola athlete who Is now attending Memphis State College, won the notice he*YywcIpht title In the South Memphis golden gloves last weekend. Clarence fought on the Oaeeolft gloves teams for two ye ir*. . . . Tom PulHg, who tolled for the. old Blytheville Giants back hi the championship days of 1937, signed recently as. man- M« of Corp*" Christ! In the Orlf Rt*to league. . . . And Frank M»netM« (brother of the; Cards' Gw) wh« played her* the same year, has signed to manage Wichita In the Big State League next yvar. The Chicks, in one of the best of-,, cnslve showings of the year, maul- Ed the Bulldogs 71-37 in the feature ;ame and the Paps whipped the lunlor Bullpups 32-23 in a prclim- .nary contest. Coach Jimmy Fisher's Chicks lung up their seventh victory of the season in easy fashion. Except brief period at the game's beginning, the Bulldogs offered little resistance, unabio to cope with the taller and more seasoned Chicks. After building up a 2B-M halftime margin, the Chicks went wild In the second half. With Montroe Holland, their big plvolmnn, and Joo Lynn Vowel], their cream- smooth playinaker leading the way, the Chicks completely outclassed the Bulldogs in the final two per- iocls. . Holland had his best night of the year, hitting the wickers for a total of 32 points. Vowoil was a hi? scoring thorn too. He whipped In 20 points. Control Kackboards Defensively, the Chicks were equally as brilliant. With their I three Ull toys, Holland. guard Bob rusnetl from (Red) Childrcss and reserve center Leon Privet^ taking care of the ball! hawking! they completely controlled the backboards during the last half and out front Tommy Mosley and Wayne Burnhnen turned in good Moor performances. The Pups ran Into a little trouble with the Bullpups in the early stages but pulled away in the third quarter for their fifth victory. The game was a bit ragged and at times got a little wild us both sides missed numerous lay-up shots. Bobby Jones with 12 points paced the Paps and center Danny Edgmon chipped in wltrl eight. Reedcr was high for Pnragould with five counters. Tomorrow night, the Paps go to Cfmithersville for a pair of games and Friday night the Chicks stay at home to take on Humes of Memphis. Junior Game Blytheville (32) Pos. (23) Pnr'gould Paragould Boy Shows Game Can Be Sport What price sportsmanship? To Dolph Wineland, Parneould High School basketball player, the price evidently makes no difference for he risked having a technical foul called against his team last night in order to b* of assistance to nn Injured Blytheville player. It happened In the second quarter o( the Blythevllle-Paragoulrl game at Parngould. Robert Harrison. Blytheville forward Injured an ankle and was painfully attempting to make his way off the playing court. The floor officials and other players apparently hadn't noticed thnt Harrison was Injured for play continued. But Wineland did. He his defensive position, helped Harrison to the bench and then screamed to the officials requesting a time out. Actually, Winelnnd made hlm- aelf eligible for a technical foul for Blytheville had possession of the ball when he requested the time out and the rules say you can't do that unless the ball is dead or In the possession of your team or there IB an injury to you or a teammate. But Blytheville Coach Jimmy Fisher requested that Wlneland's time out' be charged against his team, not against Paragould. Continued Football Telecast Restrictions Almost Certain By WIM, GKIMSLEY CINCINNATI (I?)— Live telecast* of college football game* if* •*• lost certain to be restricted again next fall, despite the governflMnl ntl-trust suit against the National Fooball League. JUST FISHING—Manager Eddie Slanky, new boss of the St. Louis Cardinals, and his wife, Dickie, display their catch in a creek near their ome at Falrhope, Ala. as the (ormer Giant. Brave and Dodger second aseman awaited the start of the 1052 baseball season. In an interview tanky promised not to be an "alibi manager" in handling the Red Birds. (AP Wirephoto). Chuck Dressen Moans Loss of Don Newcombe >V TBD RMITt TOKK Ifi **T* Cftivok DreMen, manager at the Brooklyn Don Ne»'oomb» out w« *x>lU start from swatch. He won M |*m** and we won M g*me*, to you take him out and that makes 76. "W**r* gonna h*ve *U our minor oan find two of 'em who can take league pitching prospeotg down at Florid*, spring' training. Maybe we Jones U2> F (3) Boone Akers r (3) Hlggins Edgmon <8) ....C(3) 'Burkham'er Hall (6) O (5) Hcedcr Cobb (4) O (0) Corder Substitutions: Blytheville — Shanks, Hyde, Langston, Abbott Gee (2). Paragould — Luster (1) Maxwell (2). Senior Game Blytheville (71) Pos. (31) Par'gould Vowell <20) F... (4) Barnhll Harrison P.. (7) Wineland Holland (32) C . Pyland Chtldress (10) ..Q (U) Lille MOSley (2) O (2) Filtrel Substitutions: Blytheville —Prlv ett (2), Hays U), Burnhnm (2) Gentry, O'Brien (2). Paragould — Gregory U), Wilbourn (2), Buchan an (2), Boling (2), Qoort (6). College Basketball Pr THE ASSOCIATED PRBM L* Bait* 75 Temple 69 Dartmouth 69 New Hampshire 58 Manhattan 8S Brooklyn College 41 North Carolina State Si South OsroUna 76 Olemson TO purman ttfi George Washington 78 Richmond Louisiana College 68 Centenary K Cantre 77 Asbury «7 Southeastern La 83 Southwestern La €6 Bradley 57 St. Louis 56 two overtimes Noire Dame 55 Butler 49 Oklahoma A.&M. 49 Oklahoma 40 William Jewell 66 Baker 54 Bethany Kas 74 Bethel Kas 69 Northeastern Okla 53 Arkansas Flosh 50 St. Benedicts Kns 13 Maryvllli •Mo 53 Texas Christian « Rice 30 Texas 41 Southern Methodist 3 Arkansas Tchrs 81 Arkansas College 61 Arkansas Tech 86 Little Rock JC 62 Texas Tech 62 New Mexico A.&. M. 50 Arkansas A.&M. 65 Henderson 8 Oregon 59 Washington state 4 Idaho 17 Eastern Wash 64 College of pacific 71 Fresno Stat Oceanic plankton is a driftin meadow of microscopic life whlc sustains the fish of the sea. 'ewcombe'fi place. Oh, no one good u Newk. but with spot Itehlng maybe two of 'em can do Our scouis say Ben Wade is n« of those guys. "Did I make a mistake last year? "Jaolcie Robinson says everybody i the club made a mistake. I on't think mistakes were made. We Just had lots of bad luck those ast fire weeks of the season. "What ean we do this year? "Well, If nothing happens to guys ike Jackie Robinson, Duke Snyder, Lnrfy Pafko, Roy Campiuiella and ,11 the rest of those eight fellows we can field, I don't think anyone an match us. "Sure, I think Campanella ought 0 have that operation for bone chips. Sure, I'm gonna tell him so. 'Am I gonna make predictions ike last year? 'Listen. Lots of those predlc- ions last year about the Brooklyn Dodgers weren't made by me. They were made by somebody else. I Just ;ot blamed for 'em. that's all. No Resolutions "Nope, I didn't make any New Year's resolutions about not talk- Ing. I Just want to go on being myself. "How are the Dodgers gonna do? I can tell better after spring training. If Newit was In there, it would be a race between two clubs, the Giants and Dodgers—without Newk , . . who knows? "Yep, I think Newk can improve, 1 think he can win 25 games some time." This was chuck Dressen, amiable and easy with everyone he knows—Chuck Dressen, who was awarded the New York Press Photographers' Association's first sport* award as the most courteous and cooperative person in the field of sports—Chuck Dressen, who didn't win the National League pennant but managed to win a lot Joe Kyharich Takes Over as Cards' Coach Tommy Bolt Wins Playoff At Los Angeles LOS ANGELES Tommy Bolt Bradley Upsets St. Louis 57-56 in Two Overtimes By TED MEIER NEW YORK UP) —Things »re looking up again for Bradley Uni versity on the basketball court. The Braves from Peoria chalked strengthened Hi claim as the be CHICAGO Wl— The Chicago Car dlnals. a strife-torn football tea last season, are Vn for R house 1 cleaning by Joe Kuhnrich. The husky, 34-year-old former Cardinal guard yesterday was named head coach of the club. He resigned as head conch at San Francisco last month, He took over with the gusto and eagerness befitting the youngest hend mentor In the National Football League. with a reputation for displays o] cmperament, has a M.OOO check oday to prove that his nerves are ce in Ihe clinch. The lightly-regarded 33-year-old driving range operator from Dur lam, N. C., ran away from better known Jsck. Burke, Jr., and F,. J (Dutch) Harrison is an 18-hol playoff yesterday for the Los An gelcs Open Golf Tournament's to money. • Despite a seven on the 18th hole he finished- with 69, two under pa Burke had par 71. Harrison, plagued by an abscessed tooth but uncomplaining, faded to 74. As per prior agreement, they split second and third prizes of $2,500 and *I,600 — getting $2,050 each. Although he was in minor trouble more than once, Bolt kept hitting them down the middle all day. "I've gotten mad and kicked away holes in the past, gut I think I've got It whipped," he said. His recipe for success I* simple: "You've got to diet on hot dogs for awhile. The guys that have money enough at the start to afford to tour the country don't have the guts to play top golf." ,ip their first major victory of the season last night, s 57-56 double overtime triumph over fifth ranked St. Louts. The upset victory went a long way to wipe out the string of the six defeats Bradley already has suffered. A free throw by Dick Peterson in the closing minutes of the second overtime provided the winning point. Unbeaten St. Bonaventure, • the only other team of the Associated Press top ten to play last night, fared better. The eighth-ranked Bonnles made it eight in a row by chopping down Canisius, 76-61, before a turnaway crowd of 11.9T7 at Buffalo. TCU Wins Once-beaten Texas Christian !eam In the. Southwest Conferenc The TCU boys won their 11 straight by whipping Rice, 42-3 Texas .took Southern Methodist, 4 31, in another Southwest Confe ence game. Oregon again trounced Wash in ton, 59-45, to take a firm grip first place In 'the Northern Divisii of the Pacific Coast Conference. North Carolina State, the defen Ing champs, took over undisputed udge Orders lury Hearing For TV Suit PHTLA DELPHI A CT — A legal lowdown on the Issue of con- rolled sports broadcasting and devising of National Football eagtie games was a certainty to- ay- Judge Allan Grim In U. S. Dis- rict Court ruled yesterday that he government's an ti- trust suit Siiinsb the NEL should go to ury for a decision. In turning down an NEL motion or dismissal of the suit, the jurist aid lie considered the ca.se of videsprcad interest and therefore elt it should be given a full tria During the hearing of the NEL notion, U. S. Attorney Perry Epes ndicated that the eventual outcome 1 the suit can be expected to have * major effect on radio-television ontrols by both professional teams and colleges. One of the football league's eight attorneys, former U. S, Senator Francis J. Myers warned that court victory by the government might result In complete blackout on all sports over radio television. The government charged NEL with violating the Sherman Anti-Trust Act by denying, in ef feet, radio and TV coverage o games to certain areas. The league asked that the suit be dismissed on the grounds the NEL is not engaged in interstate com meres. Bowling Tourney Opens Saturday PINE BLUFF, Ark. Wl — Th fourth, annual Arkansas Women Bowling Tournament will open her Saturday night and continue ne> weekend. Thirty-three teams are entere along with 75 doubles and 150 sin gle entries. The Southeast Arkansas Bi Company team ol Pine Bluff U tr defending team champion. Bet Turnage and Minnie Kueteman Read Courier Newi Classified Ads. Ft. Smith will defend their doubl possession of the top rung in the Southern Conference. The Wolfpack beat South Carolina, 88-76. The Oklahoma Aggies whipped their arch cross-state rivals, Oklahoma, 49 to 40. A spokesman for the NCAA telt- sion committee said today th* liege program will not b* kith- . iced by the action of > federal dge In Philadelphia yesterday fle- ering the suit to trial. ;,lt Federal Judge Alan Grim dented *•*/ NFL motion for dismissal of *• ivernment case attacking til* ague's restriction of television and idio broadcasts. He ordered a fufl ial on the issues. "Our case and that of the profea. onals ars entirely different and lis action won't sway our thlnkinf n the matter." said Bob Hall, Ysto niverslty athletic director and *• awyer-member of the NCAA cor*, ittee. Case* Different "If the suit comes out in favor f the professional league then w« ill feel we are given a free hand n our program since they arc far lore restrictive than we. "If the NFIj Is found wrong then ur case, which is different, will ave to be tried on its own merit*; Ve have not yet been told by th* ovcrnment we are in violation of ny laws." The 1B52 college television pro- ram will not be known until the ommittee's report is received and cted upon at the National Collegl- [e Athletic Association business •nceting this weekend. Right now the committee, headed iy Columbia's Ralph Purey, is pour, ng over voluminous report* pre- ^^ ;ented by the National Opinion Re- ™ iearcli Center of the University of Chicago. The NCAA TV committee held an all-day session yesterday and ha« another on tap today. It will present its stand at a round table meeting tomorrow. Foyefrteville Tops Fort Smith 38-28 FATTTEVILLE. Ark. (/P)—There* new light in speculation on the 1952 . Arkansas high school basketball championship. Fayetteville's Bulldog* whipped the Fort Smith Grizzlies, defending champs and heretofore th* 1853 favorites convincingly last night, W- 28. It was Fort Smith'* first loss la 10'games and kept Fayettevili* unbeaten for the season. title. The 1950 singles champ Fran Dura of Little Rock. "It is unlikely t keep any of the old assistant coaches." declared after being assured Managing Director Walter Wollncr that he hns a free hand. "I will bring in three others, and I hope one of them will be Bill Dadrtto, •ho used to play with me on the 'ards. Dartdto has been head coach for ive years at Allegheny College in I cad vllle, Pa. Kuharlch signed a two year con- ract for a reported $15,000 an- -innlly, SW.OOO less than his prede- essor, Curly Lambeau. loyal Accepts Mississippi Job TULSA, Okla. (>P)—Darrell Royal ill resign as backfield coach he University of Tulsa for a slm- lar position with the football staff at Mississippi State College. Royal said he WAS' named yes- !rdny ns one of two new assistants at Mississippi State. The former University of Oklahoma quarter back is to take over his new duties n two weeks. VALUABLE FRANCHISE DEALERSHIP FOR NECCH: SEWING MACHINES For Blylhcville and surrounding territory. NECCH1 is (he sewing machine thai sews on buttons. . .makes button holes. . .embroiders. .. appliques. , .blind stitches and many others WITHOUT ATTACHMENTS! For information MIDWEST DISTRIBUTORS 801 E. Mareum Little Rock, Ark. if affection in the process. So he got up last night at the ihotograrihers' dinner at Leone's estaurant and said: "You ask if it's all right to cal ID Chuck. Why, that's (lie nices ame I've been called since tha play-off game last year." LOW DOWN-PAYMENT! LONG, EASY TERMS! 9 •?- Aggies Decision Oklahoma 49-40 ST1LLWATER, OkU. (>P) — Okl& A, Ac M. College didn't need its Injured center, Pete Darcey, last' night to defeat the University of Oklahoma basketball team, 49-40. Forward Don Johnson, Just re covered from flu, led t-he Aggie attack with 10 points. Johnson teamed witb Guard Harold Rogers, who hit nine points, to pace (he Aggt&s to a 37-17 halftime lead. so smooth l!/2-fon and 2-ton BODGE' s^/->- •^•V -^^ -WaV ^^a^a^a^r ^aVHP^ -^^ Big! Powerful, High-compression Engine Trum Heavy, Rugged Frame ^SS^SfST Molded, Tapered, Cyciebond Brake linings Better Weight Distribution HTU ton m IMCaUSTM PLUS SCORES OF OTHER GREAT EXTRA VALUES...COME IN TODAY mellow and light just right BLYTHEVILLE MOTOR CO. Walnut & First PKMM4422

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