Daily News from New York, New York on June 9, 1993 · 1012
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Daily News from New York, New York · 1012

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New York, New York
Issue Date:
Wednesday, June 9, 1993
Page:
1012
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1 3 U u U yuri WU Wfc4 J By LENORE SKENAZY Dry Nevus Staff Amtef -HEY ROAMED THE ij earth. They toppled U trees. They lived 65 million years ago. And now . . . They're deep-fried. Yes. dinosaurs have finally evolved into, cute, cookie-cut-tered "Dino Fries" at the Museum of Natural History, and are already being enjoyed by everyone from Bronto-crazed toddlers to considerably older dinosaur groupies, including the Boss himself; Yes. Bruce Springsteen and family were spotted munching these $1.85 crun-chies at the museum's newly remodeled cafeteria the "Dinersaurus" just the other day. And the verdict? "We ate them," said the rock star. "We survived." Well, he never claimed to be a food critic. And even if he were, the emphasis here is on cute, not cuisine. To this end, the Dino Fries peaceably co-exist with a host of other dinosaur-themed treats: Dino gummi bears, dino napkins, green plastic dino-shaped drink containers and coming soon (ah, the wonders of food processing): dino chicken nuggets. The museum had briefly considered a Bronto Burger as well, but they scratched the idea for fear some kids might assume the grisly worst Still, the fast-food emporium does offer a burger-based Meal-o-Saurus: Patty, drink, Dino Fries and a mini plastic you-know-what toy, attractively packaged in a dino-' saur-decorated lunch box ($5.95). Picking a golden Dino Fry from her basket, actressmom Susan Gordon Clark announced proudly, "This is a stegosaurus!" She then add- IT J T'VVV Jf ' Ill -.jMfeS'i t - 1 ? DINOSAUR-SHAPED french fries win high marks with Kevin Meehan, 12. harry Hamburg daily news ed, sotto voce, "When you have kids, you learn this stuff." " ate the tyrannosaurus," crowed Rose Rock, a senior citizen who also learned her species from a pre-school paleontologist. Alas, the children themselves seemed considerably less enthused about the slightly spicy fries. "They tasted kinda like a mixture between hash browns and hush puppies," said Mark Barrow, a young man in grammar school. His brother, Alex, cut to the chase: "They're bad." Good or bad, the Nat History folks have ensured the whole eating experience be an educational one. "The museum was very interested in keeping the dinosaur theme authentic," said Paul Carroll, exec chef at the Dinersaurus. Thus, parents can rest assured that the dinos kids eat, sip and play with are just about as archeologically accurate as finger food can be. If your kids can't get enough pre-historic hysteria at the Museum's Jurassic Park exhibit opening Friday, perhaps they can bone up at the Dinersaurus. Home-style out of Africa 81 By JEANMARIE BROWNSON ORINDA -(HAFNER'S "A Taste of Africa" (Ten Speed Press. $24.95) so effectively captures the diversity of Africa's cuisines that it is difficult to stop reading it and start cooking. Equally appealing are her descriptions of the exotic ingredients of Africa and the folk legends sprinkled throughout. The book has more than 100 traditional recipes from the African continent, and from countries such as Brazil, Jamaica and Cuba, where African food has made itself at home since slaves brought it with them. Hafner also includes such Louisiana-style recipes as gumbo, dirty rice and cornbread. But her recipes present a challenge for all but the most experienced cooks. The first stumbling block for Americans is the cumbersome listing of metric measurements with customary U.S. volumes in parenthesis. Then, the cook is often left to his or her judgment regarding cooking times and pot size. On the positive sidethe three recipes we prepared were enjoyed by tasters for their flavors. Born in Ghana, Hafner now lives in Australia, where she hosts a television series, "A Taste of Africa." Hafner provides a map, along with pertinent data, V2 4 10 2 2 such as the official lan- -guage, cash crops for export and local food crops, for each country she features. Black-Eyed Beans With Fish Serves 4-6 1 pound dried black-eyed beans Salt to taste cup vegetable oil large onions, diced ounces tomatoes, blanched, peeled and diced teaspoons turmeric or 3 red chilies (hot. peppers), diced (optional) pound smoked or fried fish, boned, skinned and cut in small chunks 4 ounces dried prawns (shrimp) Soak beans overnight in plenty of water. Rinse beans with fresh water several times, then boil them in a large saucepan, with plenty of salted water. Cook 30-40 minutes, or until beans are soft but not mushy. Drain and set them aside. In separate large cooking pot, heat oil. Fry onions until golden, add tomatoes, turmeric and chilies. Stir well to prevent burning. Cook about 3 minutes on medium heat, stirring constantly. Add fish and prawns and stir. Lower heat and cook 3 more minutes. Stir in cooked beans and simmer 10-15 minutes. Serve with grilled or fried plantains and boiled "arroz bianco" (white rice). Chicago Tribune COOK IT LIGHT By JEANNE JONES No baloney, it's lo-cal cannelloni D w 5 Ui Z -o m a c 3 EAR JEANNE: I would appreciate any help you could pro vide in improving this recipe. Thank you. Diane Stallmann, St. Anthony, Minn. Dear Diane: My family loved this recipe, and it is a great way to use up leftover chicken or turkey. I. also suggest increasing the number of servings to eight, or two cannelloni each. That way you can decrease the nutritional bottom line by one-third. This is a classy dish for any occasion. Classy Cannelloni Serves 6 For the noodles: cups unbleached all-purpose flour cup liquid egg substitute tablespoons water For the sauce: tablespoon corn-oil margarine tablespoons unbleached ail-purpose flour cup defatted chicken stock cup nonfat milk teaspoon nutmeg cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese For the filling: cups cubed cooked skinless chicken or turkey (t0-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and water pressed out cup fresh mushrooms, sliced cup phis 3 tablespoons freshly grated Parme- CO T3 try D c T3 2 Vt 3 1 3 y l v 2 1 V V 1 1 v teaspoon paprika teaspoon salt egg white cup prepared sauce Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees. To make noodles, place flour in mixing bowl and make well in center. Pour in egg substitute and stir with a fork. Gradually add water until dough forms ball. On lightly floured board, knead 20 times. Divide dough in half and wrap one half with plastic wrap. Roll out the other half into an 8 X 20-inch rectangle. Cut into eight 4 X 5-inch sections. Boil several sections at a time for 5-6 minutes; drain on a towel- Repeat with second half of dough. For sauce, melt margarine in a medium saucepan. Add flour and stir over medium heat for 1 minute; do not brown. Add stock and milk. Using a wire whisk, stir over medium beat until mixture comes to a boil. Add nutmeg and Parmesan cheese and continue stirring for 1 minute more or until cheese is melted. Measure out Vicup of sauce for filling and set remaining sauce aside. For filling, combine all ingredients, including the Va cup sauce, and mix well. Place equal amounts of filling (about 3-4 tablespoons) in each noodle and roll up. Place seam side down in a shallow baking dish sprayed with nonstick vegetable coating. Pour sauce over pasta rolls and sprinkle with remaining 3 tablespoons Parmesan cheese. Bake for 20 minutes or until bubbly. Each serving contains approximately: Original Recipe: Calories: 442 Cholesterol: 159 mg. Fab 20 gms. Sodium: 523 mg. Revised Recipe: Calories: 337 Cholesterol: 42 mg. Fat: 9 gms. Sodium: 530 mg. N Kiof Features Syndicate hQ Caldor Duane Reade F.W. Voolworth 'q fP Si Jt. Want the Daily News delivered right to your door? GALL TOLL FREE 1-000 802-6397 Customer Service 24 Hrs.aDay 7 Days a.Week w"UCCOU- Also try other delicious and nutritious members of the Andy Boy family Broccoli Rabe, Anise, Celery, Carrots, Lettuces, Leaf Lettuces, Cactus Pears, Scallions, Artichokes and Italian Salad Mix. Available at Fine Local Food Markets Near You 1-8G0- 223-8080 or at D'Arrigo Bros. 315 NYC Terminal Market Bronx, N.Y.

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