The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 14, 1951 · Page 8
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 8

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Friday, December 14, 1951
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Page 8
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I r PAGE EIGHT BLTTHETTLLE (AUK.) OOOWBR HEWS FRIDAY, bBOriJvibEH 14, Chicks Meet Highly-Touted Memphis South Side Tonight Tribe Seeking Third Win; Bees Vs. Dyess in Opener Blylheville High School's Chickasaws go after their fourth win of the infant basketball season tonight at the Haley Field gym against Memphis South Side, the team picked as the one to beat in the Memphis Prep League this year. The Clikks and the Scrappers will square off in the feature game of a double bill. In the lirtt game scheduled for ^ p.m., the Chick Dees, knocked out of the Shaivnec NEW YORK, Dec. 14. Wy —No matter what punishment. If any, th« Southern Conference decides to dish out this week-end, it looks as if Maryland and Clems on were smart to grab that bowl money while they could . . . There's every indication that bowk will be out before another New Year's Day . . . The presidents committee of the American Council on Education Is against bowls. The Big Seven recently ruled them out. along with all other post-season athletic competition. The big. powerful eastern college athletic conference will consider a "no bowl" proposal today and there's a good chance it will pass. The Southern Conference presidents opposed bowls, which Is the reason why Clemson and Maryland are in hot water ... It all adds up to a ban of some sort when the National Collegiate A.'A. meets next month . . . And who'll be happiest about it? The pros ... If the college teams drop out. Its a ctnch professional teams will take advantage or .the 'enthusiastic followlngs these tourist-bait attractions have built up ... And then there's a chance for more all-star promotions like the Senior Dowl . . . Maybe college teams won't pray, but the players won't pass up such opportunities. Couple of Crack* ChBek Bednarlk', the Phlllj Ea- fle* center, and Frank Wy*". Pittsburgh Steelers tackle, are old baddies from away back . . . So when the teams clashed, the most •irpriKd guy nn thc firld ma Bednartk when Wyrto hauled off and hunjf one on him in the heat ft » scrimmage . . . Chuck walked •«r the n«* play to ask how «oni« . , . "Chuck," Wydo replied, •«« ye»ra »s» In (he Penn-Cor- IKV game jom ollpnei m«. Xow tournament last night, will take on Dyess High School's B team. Tonight's game Ls an all-important one for the Chicks in the eyes of Coach Jimmy Fisher. First, it will be their third meeting with Memphis teams and (hey will be seeking to break R one won, one lost deadlock. And second. Conch Fi.shcr Ije- lipvpA that tl the Chlckr; could take South Side then they would snap out of the offensive slump that has prevailed since losing the opening game of the season to Memphis Ea-st High nnci be off. Brat ,Ton«boro But Coach Fisher realizes that his Tribe must be at 1U very best In order to stop the high ilyins Scrapper,*;. South Side lived up to HJS pre-season rating by thumping Joncsboro, a perennial Arkansas powerhouse, 49-42 last Tuesday night, Coach Fisher spent R major portion of yesterday afternoon's practice scssion on setting up defenses to stop South Sld«'Ji offensive at- According to scouting reports on the Jonefiboro game the Scrappers have constructed their offense around their lanky pivotman Jenkins and Fisher's strategy appeared to "be to keep the free throw circle well guarded. Tonight's preliminary game will a re-play of one ol the top thrillers in th* Shawnee invitational tournament, The Bees met Dyess in a first round game Wednesday night and edged the Eagle's B t«am 32-31. . VllttAV JUllCl «*»«iiwi First Loss 43-42 Braves Pressing Stanky For Decision on Trade Boston Wants Schoendienst, Rice For Vern Bickford and Torgeson BOSTON, Dec. 14. (AP)—President Lou Perini «nd General Manager John Quinn of the Boston Braves today were pressing their former star, Eddie Stanky, Mew'manager of the St. Louis Cardinals, for his decision on an important •four-player swap. 4 1 The tribal executives laid (*>• ground work for the de»l with Pr*d Saigh, the Cardinals' owner, during this week's baseball meetlrn In New York. "We won't mention any namee' : Sportspourrt After a miserable 1950 season, Holr« Dame's footballers played to S20.879 customers ihls year with no crowd under 40,000. What became of the "pressure to win"? . . . Tojjo Palazzl, Holy Cross sonhomore basketball whiz, Is the son. of a Jonner member of King Victorto'fi honor guard In Italy. His dad was •fee Je«t nine . . . Popular Christinas gadget is a three-dimensional £hoto-v!e\ver with Instructional pictures on how to play baseball posed by Phil Rlzzuto, Yogi Berra, > Bel Maglle, etc. . . . Dave Stklolph, »ho switched from the post of baseball business manager at Spokane, Wash., to that of publicist for California Agricultural College «t Davis figures he really was farmed •ut , . . Gulfstream Park race track 9tiee had a family of alligators in habiting its infield lake. But they moved out, probably figuring tre mutuels took a bigger bite than they did . . . Freshman quarterback ,_ Vincent Gugliemi, who directed the > Not« Dame footballers ngninst Bout-hern Caliiornia, aspires to be n dentist . . .Well, he yanked the Irish throHgh Jnce. Humes Juniors Deal Blytheville Teami Pair of Setbacks Blylheville 'Junior High Schoo basketball tennis suffered (heir first defeats of the 1JI5I-52 s.-?ison last nifcht as they dropped both ends of a doublehearicr to Humes Junior teams In Memphis. The Paps, winner of their first two outings this season, were nosed out 43-42 in the feature same. In a preliminary contest the Pap "Bees" were defeated 24-21, Both games were close all the way but the feature game was a thriller. With 17 seconds la HO. the score was tied at 41-41 and Pap players missed three consecutive layup shots that could have won the game hud they been made. Bobby Jones led 'he Paps In point making with 20 hut It was pivotman Clarence Hall that made the Paps' clink. The Paps 1 rangey center was a master under the baskets and his floor play kept the Paps moving. In the B game, Kenneth Stanley led Blytheville in scoring with eight points. niMAGGIO ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT—Joe Dllvfaggio (center), veteran New York Yankee outfielder, flicks a piece of dirt from his check as he talked to newsmen Tuesday after announcing his retirement from baseball. Left to right: George Weiss, general manager of the Yankees; Casey Stengel, manager; CiMaggio; Del Webb and Dan Topping, Yankees owners. (AP Wlrephoto). De-Emphasis Program of ACE Group Hit by SEC, Bowl Men WASHINGTON, Dec. 14. (AP)—The men who run the howl gani€s and some of the men who direct Th« Waterloo railway station In London, England, covers 24Vi acres. Dell Tourney Moves Into Semi-Final Round DELL, Dec. 14, — Play in Dell High School's invitational tournament moves into the semi-final rounds tonight with four games, two boys and two girls, scheduled to be played. Self-ExpLiiiatory Xoie at the bottom of,the 20th and last psg« of thp, Wofford College haskcthall brochure: ."Tiifs basketball guide compiled, edited, tyrwd, mimcogrnphcil, stapled, folded, addressed, stamped and carried to (he pnst office by >fel Derrick sports publicity director. Griffin to Enter Marines Today LITTLE ROCK. Dec. 11. (APi — Bob Griffin. Arkansas' All-Southwest Conference srirtdrr. was In be sworn into the U.S. Marine Corps here .ociay. He was accepted for induction yesterday. He i? :o be ?mt Vo srm Diego. Calif,, fr.r hnMc tnininE:. Griffin has ar-kcd Mirine permission to play in :\\n p. .M-?Oi\~un all-itar games, the x-jr;h-.SoiitVt game in ?.robile. Ala.. Jan. a. nnrl the East-West Game at Kan Francisco Dec 29. The 23o-paunti senior from Frederick. Okla., his; born a star renter. | UeH linebacker and tackle at. Arkansas: Simmons <24> for tnrce years. He was named to i Brown 161 . Tonight's acMon starts at 6 p.m. with Osceola's girls mecllng Manila. Wilson's boys play Luxorn one hour later, with the Wilson girls meeting Dell at 8 and the Dell boys playing Gosnel! al ft. First round play was completed with four games last night. In those games, Wilson'. 1 ; girls moved Into the semi-finals by edging IAIK- ora 31-29 In i thriller, Wilson's boys rolled over Osceola 52-30, Luxora's uoys beat Armorel 41-30 in the third game and Dell's girls thumped Gosnell 38-15 in the linnl game. Donna Simmons led the Dell girls to their win with 24 points.. Gosnell was never in the game as the Dell tenm took R commanding lead earlj and then coasted home. The best game of the night was the first one in which Wilson's girls nosed out Llixora. Cockrell led Lux orr.'s scoring with H points and B Price scored 13 for Wilson. Finals In the tournament will be played tomorrow night with tht first game scheduled for 7:30. Wilson Fos. Oweol: Mnncy (6) F. ... S4> Duclo, Robinson (10) p C. fyis Frcels (91 C (11> Hi Webb (20) ... G. (Hi Wetnber McAlfre G. ... (31 Green Substitutions: Osceola—R. Rose Blirfh. Cole in, Phillips. Burn Chiles <Gi and Little. Wilson- Ward. Rankin. Projfitl, Terry. CIs roll. Tos F. F C. G G 'Me ;.. G Smith ohnson G Lewis Substitutions: Dell—P. Blair 12). idner, Brinkley (2). Holmes. Brents, cook. C. Drlnljley, J. Cook. GqsneH^-Potref Hickm'nn. I.uvora Towlei (11) Barch (D) . Lnnsford .. Williams .. Talc Hi .. Sub." tUut ions: Stovall. Tucker, Armorrl I Wilson . (2) Dixon (1) Metraer 31 Bradshaw .. ilO) Harnin .... fG> Bro\vn I.uxora—Bennett. Johnson. White Dsceo/o Faces f3 More Foes On Cage Slate OSCEOLA. Dec. 14.—Faced with 5C55ibly (heir weakest team in recent years, Cwcola High School's Semtnolc-s basketeers have 13 more game, 1 ! remaining on I heir 1951-52 schedule.- The Sciiilnotcs already have played five games and have won but two of them. Their victories were at the expense of Burdette anti_ Le- panlo. Coach Dukie Spock sMd that he still has five open dates on his schedule and hoped to (ill them in the near future. The Setninolos have two inure EArnrs to piny before taking ofl two weeks for Christmas, then in January they face the toughest part of their schedule. j The remainder of their schedule follmvs: Dee. 17, Luxora here; Dec. IK, Dell here; Jan. -1, Open: Jan. 8. college athletic programs let it be known today they don't think much of laid down by ten college president*. The presidents, members of A spccinl committee set up by the American study what's wrong with college sports, recommended these strong measures: 1. Abolition of all boul games. I- • 2. Barring of freshmen 1 from varsity sports, * 3. Refining alumn! and other booster proups permission to give scholarships directly to athletes. Three hours after the president's program was announced yesterday, Southeastern Conference athletic director. 1 !, In session at New Orleans, voted "almor.1 unanimously" to tell thc college presidents to keep their hands off the bowl policies of that conference- Representatives of the Rose, Cotton and Orange Bowls questioned. In varying degrees, the wlc-dom or necessity for. the presidents' anti- bowl proposal. A Shrine Bowl representative said he was sure they weren't after this charity game, No one commented for the Sugar Bowl. Professor H. P. Everett of the University of Washington, acting as official spokesman for the. Pa cific Coast Conference, said hi: group "!s way ahead'; of the college presidents who spoke up in Washington. Perhaps the most Interesting feature of their recommendation was the method suggested (or enforcing their proposals, which were sei forth by Dr. John Hrmnah of Michigan State. In the past a school which violated ntliletic restrictions usually has had to answer to some conference or the National Collegiate Alhletic Association. Under the presidents' propos.il, Dr; Hannah snirl, "reasonable athletic behavior" would be considered a part of the school's academic .setup. If a school got out of bounds, he said, it would jeopardize its academic standing. football de-empha£is program Council on Education, to Trabert, Schroeder Win Interzone Davis Cup Finals By GAVI.E TALBOT fc MELBOUBNE. Australia, Dec, H. (AP)—Lennart Bergeltn failed his Swedish teammates badly again today as Ted Schroeder and Tony Trabert won the doubles and clinched the Davis Cup tennis cup inter- #zonB final for 'America. The player who was supposed to e his country's ace. In the hole col- apsed almost completely after a ood start, enabling Ted and Tony o come frome behind and triumph asily. 10-12, 6-0, 6-3, 6-2. Sven Davidson, Bergelin's youth- ill partner put up a spirited battle ajl the way and never ceased try- Finals Tonight In Shawnee Meet Dyeis and Shawnee Boys and Marion, . Misseo Girls to Ploy JOINER, Dec. 1*. — The Dyess and Shawnee boys and the Marion and MIssco girls clash here tonight, in 'the finals of Shawnee High School's invitational tournament. The four teams moved into the final round by winning semi-final games. Dyess won the right to play for the tournament championship by soundly thumping the Missco boys 83-2$ In last night's third game. Shawnce's boys moved into the final rounds by knocking off a scrappy Blytheville B team W-21 in last night's final game. In the other two games. Marion girls whipped Sacred Heart of Memphis 40-29 .and Missco's girls won over Dyess 36-18. Tonight's first game is scheduled for 7:30 with the two girls' finalists playing. The boys' championship tilt is scheduled for 9 o'clock. Blytheville's B team made an improved showing over an earlier game with Dyess 1 B team. T,h e Chicks pressed the Indians for the first two quarters but Shawnee pulled away In the final two quarters. any now," Quinn said, "but we probably have offered the Cardinals more than we should. Salgh knows our offer and he wants Stanky's approval." In dire need of » second baseman, It was understood that the Braves offered Vern Bickford, the . 14-9 righthanded pitcher, and first' baseman Earl Torgeson for infl«ld- er Red • Schoendlenst and catcher Del Rice. 'Die Braves believe they have a capable successor for Torgeson in. Negro star George Crowe, who bat-; ted .339 and drove in 119 runs for their Milwaukee American Association fairn forces last season, Defensively, however, Crowe is considered mediocre. Spring Training Banned in A1C? Still Undecided a defensive tarklp. position on the ; Bbir tu All-Southwest tr,im this year. ! Workman (lit, SliHins. Tale, <4) Gentry, Earc|i <2>. Armorel—Dyer. Ashmore. While. Cockran, Bnssett. Morris. Calmon <3). IJeH 1'os. Go-mell 16) Bevill ... Lucius there; Jan. If), Shnwnee therr-: Jan. 11. Greene Connly Tech. here: Jan, 15. open: Jan. 18, open: Jan. 22. Kciscr. there; Jan. 2-!, Wilson there: Jan. 25. Mcmctto litre; Jin, 29. Keiscr here; Feb. 1. open; Frb 5, l.uxnra there; Feb. 8. l.rp.into here; Feb. 12. Dell there; Fob. 15, open; Feb. 19. Marker! Tree there. F. F. LITTLE ROCK. Dec. 14. (AP> Has or hasn't the Arkansas Intercollegiate conference banned spring football practice? The conference voted last Satur- riay, 6-4. to prohibit off-season drius. Then, president Horace Thompson of Arkansas A&M announce* he had challenged legality of th action. He contended that the amendment to the AlC constitutioi failed for lack of a two-thirds ma joriiy. Conference Commissioner H. I. McAHMer declined comment on th matter at Conway last night. But, the Arkansas Ga?ette sail this morning that the ban "is mos likely to bo considered lost as constitutional amendment." Kalafat Shines As Minnesota Beats Kentucky MINNEAPOLIS, Dec, H. (AP) — Minnesota's basketball fans had- new hero today—big Ed Kalafat. The 19-year-old Anaconda, Mont., Fophomore became Minnesota's faV- orite athletic son last night with one of the greatest point-getting, basket-ball-hawking exhibitions ever een In Williams Arena as the •ophers upset the Wildcats of Kcn- ucky, 61-57. Kalafat's 30 points against the la lion's number one basketball cam, pins an almost single-hand- id control of both backboards, ;arned the 6 feet, 6!i Inch, 244- pound center an ovation at the :nd of the game. After the final gun a mass of ans p students and teammates push- Ed onto the arena floor and carried big Ed high on their shoulders TR they started a victory celebra- :ion. Hut Ed wasn't alone on the courl last night Ambling Chuck Mence kept bringing thc baU rtown tni floor and starting the Gopher play.= Bob Gello constantly bothered th< vaunted Kentucky offense. And th other Gopher players helped mis Minnesota to one of its greatest athletic heights, Santo C/aus Gets Shock As Lad Says He Lied HUNTINGTON, W.Va., (AP) — Santa Glaus got the shdckof his lone UCe as he Interviewed petitioning youngsters in a .department store here. Jay Gould, 21-year-old Marshall College student, who has been flll- Biibyloni.in astronomers held the umber 13 to be unlucky. Here's Something New In Palsies —Stomachs LONDON" (AP>--To tbose who wondered what next- after "falsies", it's here—false stomachs. They nre designed for slender actors who play chnu-cters that have a middk-nce spread. They come in nil MZ.CS. BiceeH customers so far ing In as Santa, said he had been geting the usual requests for dolls. guns and other toys. Then one Htle follow, when asked what he wanted, came up with the shocker: "Nothing. You lied to me last yf?ar." rig, but the load was too much Ior : >ne man to carry. Bergetin's foldup was a big disappointment to the crowd of 6,000 vhich had hoped at least to witness a good doubles match after 'esterriay's one-sided singles. There was no valid explanation for Bprgelin's abject failure to play game. His teammates were extremely unhappy about Jt"Tf there had been two Davidsons out there today we might have had Swedish victory," said Frank Shields, captain of the U." S. team. The first set, which required 41 minutes, was marked only by failure of the American pair to play anything like their best tennis. The next three sets, which took only 41 minutes, were distinguished by Bergelin's failure to hold his service in five straight tries. Despite the one-sided scores In the last three sets, Schroeder and Trabcrt showed little to worry the Australians in the challenge round at Sydney, Dec. 26-28. The A+issies' two jewels. Frank Sedgman and Ken McGregor, likely would lick .hem In straight sets on today's orm. Trabert played his usual steady doubles game and got progressively better after the first set, but the American team needs Schroeder at iis brilliant best to be a threat to ,he Aussies. Schroerier's fluctuating form promises to pose a real problem for Shields after the team IHes back to Sydney Sunday and renews prac- Dyess Fos. Missco Williams (4) F.... (5) Miller Hcl'gsworth <4> .F (4) Davis Lemons (20) ....C (6) Sell Criswell (9) G.. (6) Simmons Francis (5) O (2) Sharp Substitutions: Dyess — Mahan. Henspn (18). Cox (11), Modesitt (2), Kimbrell (10)..Missco—Wallace (2), Griffin (1), Ray. Shawnee Pws. Blylheville Jenkins (4) F 9) Privett Robertson (18) ..F(3) Whisenhunt Welch (16) C ;. (« Hill Ralph (3) G. (4) Lunsford Felts CO G -, (4) Hall Substitutions: Shawnee—Brewer, Hoskins (2). Larue, Wilson i2). Bennett, streeteri Faulk (5). I theville—Michael (1). Taylor. Daniels, Vail, Stanfield (2). Kid Gavilan, Walter Cartier^ Fight Tonight NEW YORK, Dec. 14. (AP) — Cuban Kid Gavilan— the man with the iron Jaw—test* Walter Car-tier's .500 plus knockout average'to- • night in an interesting Madison Square Garden pairing. . You can watch (NBC-TV) or Us- • ten (ABC) at 9 p.m. .(CST) when welter champ Gavilan again Ventures into the middleweight division in a non-title 10-rounder. Everybody pegs away at the Indestructible kced and nothing happens. In 93 fights, only Ike Williams was able to knock him down — and he couldn't keep .him there, In fact Gavilan won two of their three bouts. It's often the Bame story when Gavilan pegs away— nothing hap- pens. His record shows 77 wins with . 22 knockouts but most of the KC« came in lesser fights. Gavilan's flashy moves, his two- step rhumba and bolo are eye- catchers. But he seldom drops an opponent. In recent fights he has Queer Bequests A New York man owning 71 pairs at trousers died in 18SO and his will instructed its executor to auction off the trousers without their being examined, and only one pair to a person. His wishes were carried out and the purchaser ol each pair of trousers ^found $1000 sewn in a cuff. chucked the bolo-rhumba style concentrated on hooks to the bodjjjj and uppercuts thrown out of a^ ha!f crouch. On the basis of Gavllah's unimpressive draw with Johnny Bratton at Chicago, Nov. 28. he Is only a 6 lo 5 favorite over earlier, Many think the price is out of line, srivine a decisive edae to the fast- rjiiiichinc Gavilan against a standup b?xer-puncher like Cartler. The life span of bees ranges from three 'weeks to eight months. tice for th echallenge round. ore actors who play the role of Shakespeare's Falstaff. Undaunted Bat - Yotmg bats cling to their mother's fur anrt thus are carried Tfbout on all her flights. The mother is capable of carrying all her young, even when Ihcir combined -weight equals more than her own. Extra-towed to be SwjJir-ffee ^ t. uv.. IT. i.a ui t, * NOTICE Northeast Arkansas District Council of Carpenters Local Ijnion No. SSI \Ynges will be as follows beginning Jan. 1st. 19.V2 on all work contracted for after Nov. 20, 1951. Jmivncynum Cavpenlcvs S2.20 Per Hr. Millwrights $2.50 Per.Hr. Pyledrivers S2.50 Per Hr. All Koremcn shall receive ,25c above .lourneymans rate of pay. 1st. Year Apprentice Sl-20 Per Hr. 2nd. Year Apprentice Sl.SVVi Per Hr. 3rd. Year Apprentice $1.65 Per Hr. •4th. Year Apprentice SI.87 1/j Per Hr. District Council Business Agent, H. T. Bryant. MOOSE LODGE CHRISTMAS DANCE Home Made Extra Hot Crisp Fried Garlic Flavored with Art Surton and his Orchestra Mirror Room, Hotel Noble Monday December 17 .. t 9 till 1 Members Permitted to Bring Guests $2.50 Per Couple HORSE RADISH BACON RINDS TOASTED PUMPKIN SEED CREOLE SOUPS Direct from New Orleans COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC WINES, LIQUERS AND CHAMPAGNES " Nationally Advertised Brandt : to meet your holiday needs. 10% Discount in Case Lots Packages GiftrWrapped If Desired Phillip Applebaum's LIQUOR STORE HO So. 5th Phone 9«41

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