The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 25, 1947 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, February 25, 1947
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Page 6
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'!?;*£? SIX . COURIER NE\VS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2 Chicagoans 500,000 Homes City Pfpnning Board Submit^ Detailed Report fo Aldermen . CHICAGO (UP) — Tiic Chtcafro Planning commission, convinced this city's housing uceri Li desperate, has submitted n far-ranging program to provide 500,000 new 01 improved dwelling units in the next t\vo decodes and re-rlevolop 22 square miles of "blighted" areas In a 236-page report to the cits council, the city's official punning agency asks all hniiiediale start on permanent, housing construction and development of "nil land within the city to its best social and economic use." , Chairmen A. H. Mellinger and H. Evert Kincaitj said, "Instead o! theconfusion over housing that we are not getting, let u s have quantities of housing of good qunlltv lit whatever level will result | n ' the greatest addition to t jie suujHv in the -shortest lime. ' ' - "Every effort must be exerted (o stimulate rental housing construction," the report said. -The majority o[ those who are in direct need o; housing, including mo st of ihe veterans, want to rent instead of •The commission estimated there are 231,000 families in the city paying $50* or more monthly for rent ?£j tsfl , equivflitint jn h °" 5ii 'B. "'"i fSfftin,; '• ^ !0 °' 000 »" (ii 'iomil families m thj s incomo bracket tion " eed beUW " d ' lg acco '"°*>- Expccl Population Gain \IU% K A 1 "", 1 , 50i) ' t)OC tiew " r «'"«>» tated dwelling units , vin bc , 1( , C(i . e<t during th e 1)cxL 20 o,- 25 vent and e ±" iSl1 " le h °" slnf! « to *Pl«> and care for an expected increase of 200,000 h, Chicago's •) 000 000 Population, the report s °>id H,r ie n, t<: T- niiSSi0 " S "S8 CS "M that the municipal, county nnd st.-ie STST 1 ?? ccncclVB '"*»»a«™ '10 n 'd the financing or ]aree-sr,!p Pfe-Apprentice School in Ohio Solves Skilled Labor Shortage v&t :;; -V '.v^sl '*Vw ' "?-* * 4 ':' "' V"* .•'***. /-life. V • . ,, . , ! ' ' ,/*'V, . V. /* V . ^ :».T\ m. * Wanted For Safe Office -'wiih SlTrinT,Wi»7n-u« i'b. -T.it W. J. INSURANC G/encoe Hotel Bldg. Phone 3545 Navy veteran Norman ('. Nusscr, 3 2, a deft man with a hawk anil trowel. Since graduation from j>r c-ap|>rcnlire school lust Oelulier, lie lias worked on fnnr him i>cs ami two larger builitln^s. I!.v JOHN O. C111KX NiCA StatY ('orre.sprmdcnt CLEVELAND. Feb. <1. (NISAl — With the cooperation of both employers and labor unions, this citv is milking 11 frontal attack upon the new Public Enemy Number 1 of home construction. Hie shortage of skilled building labor. So quietly Hint not. everybody has noticed the change, housing materials have been coinin« back Though still fur from plentiful, they have ceased to ba tin- prime bottleneck tlint is .stymieing i ] u . building of millions of Imlly nee li d homes. Experts estimate tiiat even now it would require from 250,000 to 400.000 more workers thiiii are available to handle Ihe 1917 materials supply satisfactorily. Cleveland does not claim to have solved (his problem. It tins made nn attempt so piomisitiK that John C. Davis, director of i lie MHA's construction labor division, says "Cleveland has the answer," and lias cath- ered information to pass on to other communities with a "C.o thou and do likewise" exhortation A ronture of the Cleveland Plan thru Intrigups buiidtn.; experts from other communiliCE is that' it has been started in the plnst"rin" field, which has been regarded as one of the tightest and mo«t unfriendly to training programs in the whole building imliistrv. The InitldiiiR trades have been losing skilled workmen steadily for sain; 16 years now. 'iVjilay there are in training only about 100000 apprentices, who are not riiouMi even to replace the ovcr-G5-year journeymen who will be stepping out before loiijf. Yet the need is the greatest In national history. Foreseeing the sitiintion last summer. Clevelander.s nsUed the Hoard ol Education lo Install a pre-ap- prenlicesliip course for plasterers in the Trade School. The Board agreed. The plasterers' apprenticeship committee, representing both employers and union, prepared plans; state and federal governments agreed to contribute to the costs; und the courses were opened. In most cities a young man who thinks he wants (o become a plasterer is hired, cold, by a contractor, to whom he is indentured fora four- year apprenticeship. The employer has to pull one of his too few journeymen oil production to teach the novice. If the apprentice lacks aptitude, or los?s interest, and quits or is fired, the employer is stuck. That Is one reason why builders have been backward about fostering apprenticing. Here the candidate is enrolled in the lire-apprenticeship course taught by a retired journeyman. This covers only fundamentals. Some men Bet through in five days, some take! three week.-,. They get no pay. nut as soon as (hey have learned to handle the hawk and trowel and the darby, to put plaster on a wall so that it will stay, they arc sent to a contrnclor for regular apprenticeship. Thereafter they must report back to the school one eight-hour day every two weeks umil they become journeymen. About 35 out of every 100 men who think I hey waul to" be plasterers m-a weeded out. iti the pro-course The rest are not indentured to individual contractors direct, so that they arc stuck if they pet hold of n thoughtless, selfish or incapable boss. They are indentured to the joint committee, which can take an apprentice away from any employer who fnilsc to yive him the varied f xtcnsion to Garage Adds Valuahlc Space An encloseil ixton^'on to the BII- niKO will provide a convenient- spier lor a \>;o!):'.hop, j;')ltin<; ,.,j, C (j ' .sl<»':i(!i! lor t'nrdcn cqulpir.eia andi suicmiM' furniture, jjluyliousc ami a number of other uses, it, can bo I made at a inlniiniiiii of labor and' liii'e '"-y rovcrihi; u pimple (rnuic-l work with n.sbesLcs board. '1'iiei linaril Is wrulliiM-prooI and fhv- proal and '.loc:-: not nquirc i»lnt- j ins;. ' i t Trees Stressed as rop Forester^ of the nation and mills lj'.'li.n&:!ii;r to the American Walnut, Manufacturers Association are working s-liouider- to- shoulder to keep the supply of AiiH'Hfan Walnut a continuing crop on the far.':].; and woodlands of the nation. Walnut industry mills collected and !mulshed to State Forest ' K'urseiic.s more than one mlllnn walnuts In the 19-15-40 season, ami the program has h?.?u doubled for l91(i-47. These walnuts wore stratified properly by the miraeiies and were distributed < f , fanners niv.l' Huibi-rlaiKl owner.) [or pl.iniiny Diii-pu'ifs. The .vaniu project—wiln two million walnuts .'ollected — is ih,: plan for 1S)4G-<17. Stale Dlsliibufiun Loijgii's and forcs',e:'s of tlu> v.i- i; ais mills, wliich arc located maln- !v in the Ohio. Mississippi and :oi<:<onri Valleys luivu overseen the <-:>:!i'i.-lion of ihe nuts. It;llo-.i.ii>|> Hie dispatch of the IIMIS to tiie Mate foresters, timber- l,i:id owners and farmers interested in stratified seeds or seedlings arc ii-f.i'd — through a publicity pro"i:'in—to request these frajii tho .'-':ru' nui'secies. fjnnv Theni lUulil In addition to the plnnlin» pro- Ijinin, ft-nliiut mills of (he Assccm- li/'ji ,-ire rendering «s.«istanco ant! nr.vlce in seeing that the seedlings mi'vive to become trees, throu^i ))»o|jpr bundling and cultivation.'A inanuiil for coirec; silviculture Is l!ivivicl«I by the Association. This prrsnim is handled locally | the intlls' foresters and by their log- ;;'nu buyers. Walnut industry foresters are v.< iking In cooperation with Slate and Federal Foresters with the aim u! bringing major walnut-prpdiic- ini; 'ivoodliinds under a plan of sr'-ntitic management to produce a ronUnulng crop. This, of course, requires the interest ami support ol ihe tree owners, who arc hrgmnliiE; to realize that it pays to practice ^•rnd fore.slry. training that he needs. This traininn approach has been accompanied by another recoRni- lion of the desperate state which the building trades labor market '. Is reaching: Both tin: plastering industry and the unions have re- i laxecl and liberalised their rule's. I Before the war only men in the [ lB-to-21-year age p.ronp were accepted for apprentice'training. Now the maximum ago has Been raised i to 25 years. And for ex-service men tills limit is lifted by .subtracting years-in-service from an applicant's age. Thus far the piT-iipprc!i(iceshI|i.' training plan hus been limited, here, to plasterers. Lansimr, Midi., has inaugurated n similar program for bricklayers. There is no apparent reason why it can not be extended : to cover carpenters, painters, ma- ] sons, building electricians, plumb-! crs. steamlltters, welders, 'riveters.! Fireproof Roof Shingles Growing in Popularity •An ever growing number of propel ty owners arc roofing their cuildings with asbestos cement shingles to guard against the Imz- QUICK Our Radio Repairs are quick i and pur workmanship finer! titan anywhere WE ItKI'AIil ANY SIAKE—ANY SIOBF.L ' Phone 2642 \ FRED CALLIHAN 106 South First SUFFERS NO LONGER FROM CONSTIPATION Kafs famous breakfast cereal — guts wonderful results Have yon.had to take a harsh laxative recently? Then read this sincere, unsolicited letter: -I want in loll ymi vvhnl AM-DRAtf '"" ll ,""y '<>• myjclf 11 miKljtor. V.-<! v.ci-c lioll, victims ,„• ranrtiiratiw, am | hui l ".",„!' '»*••<"«•• i'v<'j-;- niehl lo tout, 'V'.'^'.ii 'M' lve hoi " 1 ' ° r KKI'l-OfitJ'S .lU-llIMN nn.l stnriwJ ^alint it ,.(.„;,. jirlj- fo,- hrcnlifart will, K ,-an,l «,„«,. I hank you fo,- niodiicinf such „ \vctrul.-rfiil c,-r,al. ' Mrs. Manila l.:,j nc. Hoi'130. Ui:u-!eslou. \V. V;,. EatinR ICELLOGO'S ALL. UK AN regularly has brought lasting relief to thousands suffering from constipation due to lack of: buik in the diet. If this is your trouble, you too may find lastiui? relief if you cat. \LL.BRAN every clay —and drink plenty of water. If after 1(1 days you are not cainiilclc. /I*.satisfied, send the empty carton ' back to the Kcllnptfr Company : Battle Creek, Michigan — and get ifoubii: your money back! ALL-BRAN is not a purgative but a tasty breakfast food made; from the vital outer layers of' whole wheat. Eat daily either as: a cereal, or in mullins. Just ask your grocer for KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN. ^"o. OU, SPACE HEATERS RtK. S50 lo S140 NOW S35 to 5110.00 , Wm. Frascr Plainbm E t H CMin , •101 E. CUrry St. rhor.c 2 |.jj Dr. W. F. Brewer DENTIST Genera/ Practice —But— Special Attention Given Extraction and Plate Work OFFICE OVER GUARD'S Across Street From Kress Office Hours 3 a.m.-4 p.m. I'hotic 2112 Let An Expert Do the Job Right! A iof ol' hard to ^et electrical fixtures and wiring are lost to I lie user cverv day through annti'ur repair in£. , If you know nothiiiji of eUvlrical work ... let (rue of our experts do the job correctly. You'll save money m (he loni; run. Our shop carries a complete line of fixlures for the home on display in the shop. K your home needs a dressm K up. |, c sure to look these over! Hotli im- porltcl and domestic fixtures. Old Fixtures Arc Fire Hazards LET US REP LACK THEM "If you can't find it, Charlie has it!" :CTRIC SHOP 116 North First Phone 2993 The World's Luxury Cleaner * WOODWORK * PORCELAIN * FURNlTUIin * KNAMHLS Specia limited 1 I Price for Time Only Cleans Beautifully! And so FAST This is the rich, smooth Cleaner you've been wanting. No mixing; no rinsing. Just a creamy stroke that takes off dirt, and ieaves a lovely finish. That's alt (here is to it. Wipes off in a n as h. Try * bottle *»,t see! S*i'c )9 cents on th,, Annual Qu arl Special of Sani-\Vax, 'I he World's Lu\,,ry Cleaner. QEANS with a SHEEN LUMBER COMPANY ai'ds of fire and also lo five themselves of tlie annoyiuuo ol periodic roofing replacements. Wrathorii'.g or fire ha.'; no damaging effect on «.'.he.stos .shingles, whicli often outlast the striK'UiiTs 10 which tl'ey are applied. Although weighing many Inn?, hiile.s are able 10 throw tlicm- 4'eh-es clear cut of the water. Asbestos Board Widely Used in Farm Shelters Afb'\stos cement board is widely used 1 in farm building interiors wherever sanitation and fire safety arc desired. Milk houses, animal shelters, and f.irm shops are some of the structures for which a is I p.-iithiilarly well suited. It is also used t 0 liiu> granaries, where its T; protection against rodent :uid in- Vj st'.-L action is important. "Klcctrlcal Dinner'' '" An "electrical dinner" was plan—. : ned by Benjamin Franklin in 1747.' * Elcctr'ic shock w iis to kill a turkey, which was then to be roasted by ari electric jack before a fire l:i:id!ccl . by an electric bottle. 319 W. Ash St. Phone 551 104 So. Ist'St. Give Your House. . . A Homey Look! Hrab exteriors can bo made to look beaiititul in short order by a blend o! caretully chosen colors. Lei us h«'lr> you choose the right pnini to do the .)<))>. Our line of T<)])-Quiility Mooi'o 1 anils look better—last longer! Use Moore Quolity Points 'Your Wallpaper Style Center" &, FAINT STOUE Phone 469 Remodel With An Easy Home Loan! Without the fuss and bother ot formalitv von can sit clown nnci work out an i in prove mem loan nt Davit] Heal Estate. The home voti have outgrown or want to remodel can be converled to look as yon want it with loan payments as easy as rent! The Home of The Futsire Means Planning Today! —- ITl A \/1 W& U&\ V H fea^"^™ Real Estate & Investment Co. T12 No. 2nd Phone 3633 Belt Drivpn Exhaust Fans foe vcntilai-ing and effective cooling .... Outstanding Features: A. Fan guaranteed for five years— motor guaranteed for one year. H. Certified air delivery rat.ings— fans tested under ASM & VE code by independent laboratory —Texas A & J\[ College. C. All fanS have Underwriters' Laboratory Label with reinspeelion service—guarantees user protec tion. f I). GO years exclusive fan engineering experience. 1. Sturdy Construction: Built to give years of quiet, trouble-free service. 2. Shipping crate designed for use in installation— Minimizes installation expense-crate easily removable for special application. ,'i. Rail Hearing Shaft Conslruction— May be installed in any position discharging up, down, or at arty angle. '1. Zi-phair Blades—14-gauge steel die formed—balanced within Mi; ox. guarantees maximum ;iir t!o- livery — eliminates vibration quiet operation. 5. Stream Lined Orifice: Integral part of rugged steel frame—provides maximum delivery with minimum noi.se—in- creased efficiency. (i. Mounting arms offer minimum obstruction to air flow—absorb vibration. .TV Century capacitor and split phase, '' ' ball bearing motors-extra power. —long life. 8. All motors equipped with thermal overload protector — iirovpnls burned out motors in case oi low voltage or overload. !). Non Stretch V Kelts — highest quality, long wear. k Call us for an climate on installing a Hunter Attic Fan in your home—Now is the time. Hardware • Electrical Supplies 213 MAiN STREET p/, one 2015 BLYTHEVILLE, ARKANSAS Seeds • Harness • Farm Supplies EAGLE STAMPS

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