The San Francisco Examiner from San Francisco, California on September 1, 1963 · 124
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The San Francisco Examiner from San Francisco, California · 124

Publication:
Location:
San Francisco, California
Issue Date:
Sunday, September 1, 1963
Page:
124
Start Free Trial
Cancel

2 m tils' til juh 553 S :H2 fig S2 1:2 2 H S S3 Sis lo fil any window nr dnr-wav. Noin- fiiwr any w hire anil . . . si LOW. LOW PRICKS. 7"x44" $3.28 f"iSr 5.91 12"i80" 10.83 50,000 Mick ir in our San KramWo factory rraclv in jp! We alxi manufacture Shojis al MiH'lt m- rrailv In git. POUT UUUMdl FOI mmiu tut wotiMiNsmf if n H'aHfr iHtlallaliun Tie Sunday Q0O0CDQ has strong sales IMPACT INTEREST PRESTIGE Place your SALES MESSAGE where your advertising gets best results. Call SU 1-2424 Extension 440 LoueJa Parsons Chuck Connors Big Man With a Big Future Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Joseph Aloysius Connors dropped in to see me one afternoon recently. Moviegoers know them better as Chuck Connors and Kamala Devi. The Brooklyn-born Irishman and the Bombay-born East Indian, married in April, are as unlikely a combination as you could dream up, but they seem ideally mated. Chuck and Kamala met when both played in "Geronimo." She was the last actress to be interviewed for the lead opposite him. "I took one look at her," says Chuck, "and that was it." It's easy to understand. The half-English, half-Indian Kamala is a beauty and as nice as she is pretty. Big things are ahead for big Chuck (6 foot 5, 200 lbs.). He's co-starred with Doris Day and James Garner in "Move Over, Darling," which opens at New York's Radio City Music Hall Christmas week. He's also starred in Revue's new 90-minute series for ABC-TV, "Arrest and Trial," pre-miering Sept. 15. In the new series Chuck plays a highly articulate criminal attorney. "For 5 years in "The Rifleman'," he says, "I wore a wardrobe that cost $8.50. Now, for 'Arrest and Trial,' I have 11 tailor-made suits which cost 1400 apiece, as well as some sharp sport jackets and sweaters." "What about your career?" I asked the beautiful Kamala. "He is the boss," she said with an adoring look at Chuck. "Well, Boss?" I put it to her bridegroom. Chuck grinned. "I hear good reports about her in "The Brass Bottle' with Tony Randall," he said. "Universale talking about a sequel. But I'm not sure I'll let them have her back she's too good a cook!" Chuck went on to tell me that Kamala insists on getting up every morning at 6 and cooking him a big breakfast before he goes to the studio. "Then she sends me off like a schoolboy. Pats me and says, 'Go say your 15 pages of dialogue, darling, like a good toy.' And every noon she cooks a different lunch and sends it over to me." This is a second marriage for Chuck. By his first, to model Elizabeth Jane Riddle, he has four sons ranging in age from 7 to 12. He spends most weekends with them and he says it makes all five of the Connors men very happy that Kamala likes baseball. "Of course, it took her a while to get her terminology straightened out. At first she called the pitcher's mound an 'anthill' and referred to a base as a 'pillow.' And one day when the Dodger fans were chewing out the Giants' Willie Mays and I explained to her that they were trying to upset him. She called out, 'Be distressed, Willie!'" ( SoV "1 took one look and that was it," says Chuck Connors of his vrife Mirror of Your Mind Should Teen-Agers Dress as They Choose? by Joseph Whitney Not always, but neither should they be denied freedom of choice. Young people who have grown gradually from dependence are usually able to exercise fairly good judgment and taste in selecting their clothes. What is more important, they can accept suggestions gracefully and commands when necessary. The unhappy conflicts between parental and adolescent ideas of dress, present in many families, often could be avoided if the children had learned early to make decisions and choices. If they have always dressed as they were told, their adolescent rebelliousness is apt to show up in a determination to go counter to parents' taste. Much of the beatnik-type apparel is merely rebellion against the rigid rules of authoritarian parents. Many parents impede or interfere with the growth of a youngster's interest in dress and personal adornment by overstressing the importance of convention before he is ready to understand or appreciate such motives. Are Most People Fanatic at Times? Probably not, although some otherwise well-balanced persons become temporarily touched with fanaticism when under the influence of extreme fear or excitement. It is not unusual for us to call an individual "fanatic" who has a deep spiritual, political or scientific conviction different from the general belief. However, it is not what a man believes (no matter how irrational his beliefs may seem) that mark him as a fanatic, but the way his feelings affect his personality and his interactions with his fellow beings. Fanatics are often dangerously persuasive; partly because most of us share their longing for "certainty." Since they boldly claim they have the right answers, their arguments are often sufficiently seductive to attract many followers. Is There a Shoplifting Personality? To merchants and law-enforcement officers, the image of the typical shoplifter is that of a middle-aged, middle-class woman of fairly good reputation who suddenly steals some article which she can well afford to buy. In a recent survey of some 500 convicted women shoplifters in London, it was found that almost one-third were foreigners; mainly young girl students living with English families on an exchange basis. Apart from these girls, the common age of the English women convicted for shoplifting was between 50 and 60 years. The San Francisco Examiner PICTORIAL LIVING September 1, 1963

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 19,500+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The San Francisco Examiner
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free