The Daily Oklahoman from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on May 10, 2011 · 87
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The Daily Oklahoman from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma · 87

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Location:
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Issue Date:
Tuesday, May 10, 2011
Page:
87
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Fit to be young Could exercise be the fountain of youth? Everyone knows that exercise is recommended to help you stay healthy. But new research suggests that regular exercise can help your heart defy its natural tendency to lose mass and elasticity and could even help your heart gain these qualities as you age. LIFE TUESDAY, MAY ID, 20U THE OKLAHOMAN NEWSOK.COM Lillie-Beth jBrinkman opubco.com App Poynts users in right direction I have finally found a mobile application besides Facebook that I'll use regularly on my Black-Berry: Poynt, available free from Poynt Corp. by Multiplied Media. The Poynt app also is available for iPhone and Windows 7 and Android phones. "Where can we Poynt you today?" reads the home screen, which is exactly what the app does. It uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) of your cellphone to localize your search for restaurants, movies, businesses, events, people and more. On my BlackBerry, Poynt acted fast and found many of the sites I was looking for closest to me. An email first alerted me to the app as a good one to use when searching for the lowest gas prices near me. The app "uses your phone's GPS and cell site location to know where you are and directs you to the nearest andor cheapest options to fuel up," read the email pitching the app. "Poynt's gas feature offers users a smart option to save money on a costly necessity." I realized the app not only performed that function well, but it offered an assortment of location searches often only available on smartphones one app at a time. The app was better and faster than a Google search on my smart -phone's browser for finding businesses, doctor's offices and even people at home. Since searches were pinged to the phone's physical location, I didn't have to type in "Edmond, Okla." as part of the search. From the Poynt results, I could call the business or drive there with driving directions from Google or BlackBerry Maps without typing in new information. Poynt wasn't perfect. In the restaurant search, although it pointed me correctly to several places to eat near me, the first match was to the "Minor Foral Baseball Academy," which puzzled me. In looking it up, I found that the baseball academy was a few miles away and didn't appear to have a restaurant. However, the associated phone number was to a nearby Starbucks. If any of the restaurants the Poynt app found required reservations and worked with OpenTable. corn's reservation service, I could have used it to reserve a spot. The app partners with search engines such as SuperPages, White Pages, Cinema Source, movie tickets.com, Opus and others to provide results. Find the correct version for you by typing rn.poynt.com in the browser on your phone. Email your app ideas to lbrinkman(9 opubco.com. For more, go online to blog. NewsOK.comget-appy. The Oklahoma History Center is giving a "salute!" to the long-running country variety show with the exhibition "Pickin' and Grinnin': Roy Clark, 'Hee Haw' & Country Humor." pHOTo provided by the Oklahoma history center Roy Clark talks 'Hee Haw' ENTERTAINMENT HISTORY CENTER HONORS CLASSIC COUNTRY COMEDY SHOW BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnellc3opubco.com For Roy Clark, the quarter-century he spent as the co-host of the TV show "Hee Haw" is the topper on his richly satisfying entertainment career. "I've often said that it was the icing on the top of my professional cake," Clark said in an interview from the Oklahoma History Center during the opening of the new exhibition "Pickin' and Grinnin': Roy Clark, 'Hee Haw' & Country Humor." The 3,000-square-foot exhibit offers a hearty "salute!" to "Hee Haw," the long-running country variety show that showcased corny country humor alongside performances from top-notch country, gospel and bluegrass musi- Tulsa resident and "Hee Haw" co-host Roy Clark poses with the Hee Haw Honeys. PHoto provided by THE OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER cians and made Clark and co-host Buck Owens household names. With his lively sense of humor and prodigious musical skills, Clark was "the heart and soul of 'Hee Haw,' " said Bob Blackburn, Oklahoma Historical Society executive 'PICKIN' AND GRINNIN': ROY CLARK, "HEE HAW" & COUNTRY HUMOR' Where: Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive. Information: 522-5248 or www.okhistorycenter.org. director. "Prior to 'Hee Haw,' I had done every variety show that was on television. I had done everything from 'Beverly Hillbillies' to 'The Ed Sullivan Show' to 'The Tonight Show.' If it was on the air, I did it. But people back then, like at an airport or something, they'd look SEE CLARK, PAGE 3D Oklahoma musicians recall performances on famed show BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnellc3opubco.com The long-running country variety show "Hee Haw" may have been filmed in Nashville, Term., but in many ways, the heart and soul of the series has always belonged to Oklahoma. Co -host Roy Clark, the genial multi-instrumentalist who has lived in Tulsa for 40 years, was "the heart and soul of 'Hee Haw,'" but the show's Oklahoma ties certainly don't end there, said Oklahoma Historical Society Executive Director Bob Blackburn. "The Oklahoma connection is there from day one," he said. "It's really as much of an Oklahoma story as much as it is a Nashville story." "Hee Haw" creators Frank Pep-piatt and John Aylesworth and producer Sam Lovullo found a perfect co-host and straight man for Clark in Buck Owens, whose nationally syndicated program was shot at Oklahoma City's WKY-TV. The singer guitarist continued "pickin"' on "Hee Haw" until 1986, while Clark kept up the "grinnin"' until the show ended in 1993. From 1981 to '93, the show was kept on the air by broadcasting companies associated with The Okla- From left, Oklahoma fiddler Byron Berline, former "Hee Haw" co-host and longtime Tulsan Roy Clark and "Hee Haw" regular Jana Jae perform at the opening of the Oklahoma History Center exhibit "Pickin' and Grinnin': Roy Clark, 'Hee Haw' & Country Humor" on May 2. OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER PHOTO Mickey Mantle and Johnny Bench were among the famous folks who popped out of the cornfield to tell appropriately corny jokes, while evangelist Oral Roberts did a scene in Archie Campbell's barbershop. And a veritable constellation of the state's music stars played the show, including Roger Miller, Patti SEE SHOW, PAGE 5D homa Publishing Co., which publishes The Oklahoman. In addition, more than 40 performers with Oklahoma connections appeared on the show, many of them clients of legendary Tulsa-based agent Jim Halsey. Comedic actor Gailard Sartain and fiddler Jana Jae, who both have Tulsa ties, became "Hee Haw" regulars. Oklahoma -born baseball greats HELP MDA FISH FOR FUNDS NORMAN - Make plans to attend the 25th Annual Big Catch Fishing Tournament to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The event will be Saturday, May 21 at Calypso Cove Marina at Lake Thunder-bird, and the tournament grand prize is $5,000 cash. Pick up registration forms at 7-Eleven stores or call the MDA office at 722-8001. Early registrations received on or before Wednesday, May 18, include a free T-shirt the day of the event. For more events, go to wimgo.com. 5T WAIF OF OXYGEN Paris Hilton has landed another reality show. "The World According to Paris" debuts on Oxygen in June. "This show is not like anything I have ever done," she said. "People will get to see how I really am." Hilton's experience in television includes "The Simple Life," "Paris Hilton's My New BFF" "Paris Hilton's British Best Friend" and countless talk show appearances. FROM WIRE REPORTS GIVE GOLD FOR HOPE NORMAN - Let your unused bling help Health for Friends, a Norman group that provides a medical home for Norman residents with no other access to health care. The group will hold a communitywide gold drive from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 19, at Mitchell's Jewelry, 218 E Main. You can donate gold, silver, diamonds, watches, coins and other precious metals and stones that you no longer need. You'll receive a tax receipt at the event. For more information, call 329-4161 and choose option 6, or go online to www.healthfor friends.org. FROM STAFF REPORTS Fitness & Health 2D TV I Puzzles 4D Dear Abby 5D Horoscope 5D

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