Fairbanks Daily News-Miner from Fairbanks, Alaska on January 4, 1934 · Page 4
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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner from Fairbanks, Alaska · Page 4

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Fairbanks, Alaska
Issue Date:
Thursday, January 4, 1934
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Page 4
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(it, ALASKA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1934. LAST MONTH PROVED ONE OF COLDEST (Continued from Page 1> on 8 days, as compared with a normal of 6. The total snowfall for the month was 15.7 inches. At the close of the month there were 27 inches of snow on the ground. Seventeen Clear Days There were seventeen clears days; four partly cloudy, and ten cloudy days during the month. There were 41.4 hours of sunshine during the month, or 34 percent out of a possible 123.1 hours. The prevailing wind direction during December was from the north, the total wind movement being 1.664 miles, or an average hourly velocity of 2.2 miles. The highest wind velocity during the month for a sustained period ofj 5 minutes was 22 miles per hour from the southwest on the 12th. Auroral displays were recorded! on 23 days. At the close of the month the thickness of the ice on the Cnena River in front of Fairbanks averaged 31.0 inches. Abnormally Low Temperatures The weather at Fairbanks during i the year 1933 was characterized by abnormally low temperatures and precipitation slightly below the average. The average temperature for 1933 was 22.0 degrees, the lowest on record since complete records began in 1906. The previous lowest mean annual temperature was 22.3 degrees in 1932. The previous highest mean annual temperature for Fairbanks is 26.3 degrees. The highest temperature for the year was 88 -degrees on July 28, and the lowest was -60 degrees on January 28. There were 164 days when the maximum temperature was freezing Or lower, 243 days with minimum temperatures freezing or lower, and 119 days with minimum temperature zero or lower. The last date in the spring with freeing temperature was June 1 and the first in the autumn was September 2. Precipitation For Year The total precipitation for the year, (rain, melted snow, sleet, and hail) was 11.14 inches, or a deficiency of 0.63 inch. The total snowfall (unmelted) for the year was 80.0 inches. There were only four days during the year on which thunderstorms occurred. There were 153 days on which auroras were observed, as compared with 210 days during 1932. The last auror- al display to be observed in the spring was April 30 and the first in autumn was on August 13. There •were 2066 hours of sunshine during the year, or 42 percent of the possible amount. There were 91 clear days. 82 partly cloudy, and 192 cloudy days, and 114 days on which j 0.01 inch or more of precipitation occurred. The ice in the Chena River in front of Fairbanks moved May 5 and closed for the winter on October 18. SOUTHERN CROSS ARRIVES IN BRAZIL NATAL, Brazil, Jan. 4.—Completing an Atlantic crossing from Saint Louise, Senegal, Africa, the great French flying boat, Southern Cross, arrived today at Natal. EX-PRINCE OF SWEDEN STAGES STOCKHOLM PLAY STOCKHOLM (IP)— Lennart Bernadotte, the prince who renounced royal rank to marry the girl of his choice, is producing ,a Swedish translation of the Norwegian play. "Mollusc" by Henrik Krogh, at the student theater here. Mr. Bernadotte emphasized in an interview that he had no intention of taking up theatrical work' as a profession and that the present production is "purely an amateur effort." -LEAVES TO «£T(JR\) TO f?oetc VJOULO SET A SIS K\OC. OUT OF -&US VJOM LAST/lOG. CiOlftoU PA AS ONE OF" 60UTS A ul = SK — (OOU ASOOT ISO MAT04S.5 O£VJE LOPEO filS L.S&S OO ARM "WAT 4E MAO£ FAMOUS. H& JO/MHO ANG 1926 ue L6AUIUG SCORE DAILY NEWS-MINER TERRITORY'S NEEDS PUT IN BUDGET (Continued from Page 1.) connection with the Legislature, $42,320 is provided for 1935. This amount is $680 less than for 1933. The sum that was alloted for 1934 is not stated in the President's budget. Governor And Secretary For salaries for the Governor and the Secretary of the Territory $14,040 is requested- for aext year, compared with 514,140 for this year and $15,000 for' last year. For. contingent expenses in Alaska, $14,720 is estimated for 1935 j compared with 516,520 for 1934. For support of reindeer stations and instruction in care and management of the animals $30,520 is I requested for next year. For these 1 purposes, $32,400 was estimated this year, and $33,400 was allowed last year. For the education of Alaska In- j dians. as set forth in appropriations asked for by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. $572,600 is the figure for 1935, compared with S600.000 for 1934. | For the suppression of liquor traffic among Indians, no recommendation is made in the budget for next year. For this purpose. $11,370 was alloted for this year, and $12,000 was expended last year. GLEN C. BARTLETT QUITS FRYE HOTEL SEATTLE, Jan. 4.—Glen C. Bartlett, widely known hotel man, who is said to know more Alaskans personally • than anybody else, announced yesterday his resign*-,, tion from the management of the Frye Hotel in Seattle. Subscribe tor tee Wew»-Mtaw. PHILCO THE WORLD'S FASTEST-SELLING RADIO Philco Model 16 All-Wave Radio, Unexcelled for regular Broadcast Reception— plus .most efficient recep- 1 tion of Short-Wave Bands; ; including the Ultra-Snort Waves of British Empire Station Broadcasts. Philco—A Musical Instrument of Quality Cann Studio INCORPORATED LERDAHL-POLLACK FLYING SERVICE Monocoupe announces New Stinson Reliant Fast ,Economical Passenger and Freight Service to Any Part of Alaska. FREIGHTING STUDENT TRAINING Call Office for Information Hotel Keepers Rooming House Owners Our Sacrifice Sale OFFERS YOU A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY TO STOCK UP ON BLANKETS, AT PRICES LOWER THAN PRESENT WHOLESALE LANDED COST Here Are a Few Sale Prices for Comparison DOUBLE BLANKETS Part Wool Size 70-80 $2.95 SINGLE SHEET BLANKETS Size 60-90 65c DOUBLE BLANKETS 50% Virgin Wool Size 70-84 $4.85 100% VIRGIN WOOL BLANKETS Double Bed Size $7.50. MAIL ORDERS MUST INCLUDE ALL PARCEL POST CHARGES Abe Simson

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