The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on August 21, 1947 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, August 21, 1947
Page:
Page 5
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1947 Bl/TTHKVIMJ! (ARET OODKOtl Current Fashion Trend to Longer Skirts Brings Blustering Blasts from Men as Well as Women; Some Blytheville Belles to Wear Monstrosities By A, A. FHEDKICKSON (Courier News Stiff Wri(ei-) (Skirl Editor) This dress-lengthening business that women's clothes designers and manufacturers are cooking uj> with an obvious eye to milking the fashion-blinded female of a bundle of j Treasury notes tills season Is belli;; erected with a variety of responses in Blytheville. •It-seems that prices of current fashions aren't, high enough or there's to much, material [or 'tha manufacturers, retailers, et at, to keep up the hocus-pocus of a short- I age. iAt any rate, dress designers 'middled over Martin's In their ivory ! towers in the fabulous lands of Hol- lywcod, New York anil Paris have decreed that women shall wenr their skirts at a new lo'.v this season. •Majb^ 1 so in (lie fashion-mad capitals of the world, but how atont Blytheville? What happens in H town the size of this one, where if your neighbor doesn't know your wardrobe nearly as well as licr own it's a .sign she doesn't care what you .-wear? Talk about Gaul being divided into three parts. The divisions of opinion In Illytheville regarding the impending fashion dictates makes that ai'.t'ient partition Ico'd like small-town politics. Mm in Belligerent M-juil A cursory survey of the disregarded mule's view oti this issue yesterday showed varied reactions hut with a strain of consistent disapproval running through all. His view, alter all, may not be worth the eye-strain if skills drop way below sec-level. These SCIMII to be the rcughly- ouUined' categories in which Bly- •thevillc men f:xM on the Nylon black-out: 1) Those who object to the disappearance of America's greatest siaht-ser.ing attraction. 2) The married lads who feel a slight binding in the wallet whenever the subject comes up. 3) The biichelors who feel their fight for freedom is a lest cause it only the married men are to enjoy the sight of an unswathed limb.- Tire of Seasonal "Swilchcroo" 4) Those who point out that women have long been suckers lor dress-designers' whims and that this is just another case of the seasonal swilcherco lo keep them laying it on the line lor unncccled clothes simp!y be:ause they're "in Etylc." 5) More married men who have •put. their loot down in Advance and said they'll refuse to shell out cash for a new wardrobe for the little woman. The wcnien themselves — bless their inconsistent liitle hearts — have indicated that even they take R dim view of hiding their legs. A United -Frets survey showed yesterday that although ouiy, one^out jif every four women in 13 cities approved of the longer dresses, nearly two out of three plan to wear Editor's Note:—The Courier News society editor and a bachelor member of the news stall did u little checking on Blythevllle's reaction (and the men in this Instance were not ignored) on the decree of the fashion makers that longer dresses me to be the "one and only thing" for mi-lady this Fall. It seems that nobody loves the fashion makers for coming up with this sort of a new deal. tllCi.l. Tpin't KO here, declares many a Blythevillc husband. About wearing them, that Is. Whether they approve of the street-length street dresses, wives here in ceneral are in for a rude surprise when they buzz hubby for the cash ;u any. that extra hem yardage. Every married man asked yesterday whether he would cough u.p the cash for a new wardrobe for tile little woman replied— to a man: "No!" •nut some of the more determined women smile knowingly at such male complacency. It's their .candid opinion Unit in many cases, after liubby has suffered the ruck and Uimrb-screws of feminine wile:;, this answer will evolve a meek affirmative. if ao, live'Il get you one that hubby wears that pre-war suit another couple of years. Vtrbal Knck.s Tossed MDre adamant husbands stood back and threw verbal rocks at the perpetrators of such fads as this latest pipe-dream from the depths of a dre.ss-dcsigncr's overdrawn bank account. It's a fraud, the husbands say. clutching their wallets. Each year 'dross designers cut loose with something the women don't have in their wardrobes and blow the trumpet of fashion long and loud until each female that doesn't answer the call feels she is a. satorical stacker, the men assert. Blytheville men in general applauded the action of a group of Texas gals who have banded together in opposition to the new skirt length. Known as the "Little Below the Knee Club," these women are prcnd of the brand of legs turned out in the Lone Star state and have no intention of letting a knock-kneed dress designer cover l',p the first thins about a woman that the average man notices. Well, that's the long and short of it. Whafll it be girls? By KMII.Y W1XSON (Society Editor) Not That Cool! Although Blytlicviltc women have not yet formed an organization us some cities have to protest (lie lengthening of dresses, a snrvov reveals that some will slum the new (or old and re-Introduced) style and continue to wear their dresses Just below the knee while others will follow the (rend unwillingly. There are some who welcome the change and the chance to cover up their legs and n moneyed few who have grown tired of the length they say has teen stylish' "too long." The majority would not.object lo a happy medium, a little further below the knee than hist year but not Quite so long as "the new fashions. "We're perfectly willing lo let out the hems but we can't afford In buy new wardrobes," is the general feeling. Opinions as to tlrj perfect length vary. Many of the younger school and college group lihe the id™ of "just below the knee," adopted by i> club In Texas, the "Little Below tlin Knee Chit)." an organized rc-j volt against new long skirts. Some of their mothers and young business women would like "them! still longer than that, about I tic I middle of Ihc calf of the K-R. I But that the new length, almost \ to the ankle, is tmbecuiniiVj, as well as expensive, is the general opinion. ."They can make us wear them long by making that the style, but they can't make us like it." one Blytheville woman said. Another decided, "Well, I'll let the hems out of some of my dresses but us for buying a lot of new ones, I just won't do it. And I'll have a lot of company." PAQE 1 Little Valerie Savukas is moved 10 tears when she hears thut Kvclyn Peterson, a life guard »t 11 Coney Island, N. Y., pool, won't let her cool ci[T in licr own uninhibited way. Last'of Group? Many zoologists believe that the spcclnil tarsier of Borneo represents Hie last of a group of animals from which apes and monkeys originated. the Crash Victim Dies PINE BLUFF, Ark., Aug. 21. (UPl —The. body ; .of Hwynn Lcnoir Lil- larcl ol Mcijiphis Is^beinc--sent"-.to Greenville; S. C. today for burial following his death'in a hospital here last night. Death resulted from injuries suffered when his automobile skidded off a highway near here Aug. g. Lillard was Southern representative of the Lima Locomotive Works of Limn, Ohio, and had lived in Memphis 18 years. BULOVA A. PRINCETON :i icwels B. DIRECTOR 2lic.-cli 157 S" Pat O'Bryant JEWELER Main at d'ccum! 1'honc 3^6f Girl is Crash Victim CAMEEN, Ark., Auj». 21. (UP) — Funeral services were being planned today for sixteen-year-old Doris Haynic of El Dorado, who died yesterday in a Camden hospital The gir! was latally injured when a truck in which she was riding with her brother crashed into the -J*^ '•-.V GAY STEPS \ Young licau-slcakrs, matched to your every Fall mood. Conic sec our new Paradise fashions, as shown in votir fnvoritc magazines. ) In Black Sucdo Town Brown Calf Family Shoe Store Phone 2342 312 West Main St. Breaking all Records for Value! AUGUST RE SALE PORTABLE ELECTRIC RECORD PLAYER 27 C8 On r.tm,, 10% Down, U a MaM Powerful nmplilicr! 1'liiyn 11) nr \'i'' iccuitls. 1'iiIB tone! 500U phiy needle! EXTRA COMFORTABLE .,..-. o PLATrORM ROCKER $49.0 A well-lmilt piece iirnllraulivo Dillo tapestry uuvcrii.' Spring cnnslniclion. 1st, SPECIAL! CELANESE* TAILORED PAIRS $2.94 Fini: i:ln:ir; wravc, nnfi noli sheen! Hang I«:niliriill)'!'i:i"x81". *Kcjj. 1'at. OB. Back to School in ^WlNTHROP JRS MAIN STYLE SHOES FOR BOYS Send him back lo sciioul in Man Style Wintlirop Jrs. He'll go for their growi? upgoocl looks. You'll marvel, at the way they wear. FAMILY SHOE STORE 312 W. Main St. 'INTHROP SHOES AUGUST SPECIAL ; ; ; 2-PC. LIVING ROOM GROUP ] 54 gg A Waul vulur Hun's lur.l lo ]„•;,[! Impressively Blylcd fiofn will, ] , gc cli.iir I" iiKilcli in rich covers uf slimly I'Yic/e. Uccp siiriii^lillca cusUioru OM • On 7erm«: $10 coil K |,,i,,j; base fur your ulmosU-Hst!, himlivooil frames. ' ° t , WALL COVERING CUT 10%! 4tt foot ENAMO-WAU . . . " " JQ C Kasy to ajijil)! [,r>,,k s ]|k,. |j| r -,,,,1 | ;l!lls for years. Ideal for iilclii ji, iuliiruuiii! REG. 79c PRINTED CRETONNES Itir, MIIW fur slip i:ov> ris anil diaprnr.s—• tavc! Vai-il\nl flornlsi 1.59 GAY PLAID SCATTERS |37 22,34",!a Kups of soft spun col- II.TI! Wear well—watli f.i.-ily.liiiiriglil colors for 111,111 v rooms. MODERN V/AINUT WATERFALL DESK 7 nintiiy drawers! Hardwouil constmc- liuii nilli \Vulnut veneers ;ind linisli. MODERN DESK CHAIR 688 Styled of finrdwonil ill Mimrt Walmil lin- i^li! L'iiddcd seal in arlilicial leiilher. WARDS Vig-0-Rcjt SPRING 5-PC. PLASTIC- CHROME DINETTE 59** Hcal-rcsijliinl liiininalcd plastic table lop -lour chairs in arlificia! leather. : PLUMP FEATHER PftlOWS 3.88 99 cxlrn deep doulile- dcek coils! Heavy con- slruclion,' nifl-proof iilinniiuim linisli. ^ Uuck, 6556 Turr, key feathers in Jura-, ble blue and *'.hite v *'ovcn-stripc • ticLinE. *• MODERN CEDAR OUST 49" 48-in. long nilh solid Red Cedar' lining. Modern slyle wilh Walnut ven«crs.

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