The Journal News from Hamilton, Ohio on October 31, 2005 · 6
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The Journal News from Hamilton, Ohio · 6

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Hamilton, Ohio
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Monday, October 31, 2005
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6
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A6 | JournalNews Monday, October 31, 2005 NEWS Name : Emma Jean Butler Age : 61 Residency : New Miami Education : New Miami High School, Cleveland Technical Institute Full-time occupation : AK Steel, business owner (Hunter Cafe) Public of ces held : In current position (on council) for two years What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a council member work to lessen that problem? : The books need to be straightened out. That’s one of the problems. Hopefully now we have two good people that will straighten up the books. What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council? : For the council to start working together. What is your opinion of New Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : I would say the school system is excellent. We have good teachers, a good super intendant and a good principal. Children are blessed to have the educators of New Miami. Name : Bruce Butler Age : Declined to answer Residency : Declined to answer Education : Declined to answer Full-time occupation : Declined to answer Public of ces held : Declined to answer What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a council member work to lessen that problem? : Declined to answer What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council? : Declined to answer What is your opinion about New Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : Declined to answer Name : Bill Flynn Age : 46 Residency : New Miami Education : High school graduate; Warren County Career Center, heavy equipment certi cate; Nappier truck driving certi cate, Class A CDL Full-time occupation : In between career change Public of ces held : Four-year member of council; vice mayor for one year. What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a council member work to lessen that problem? : Right now it’s four of us on council that really don’t have a problem. We’re trying to take care of some things. But right now, we’re hitting on all cylinders, trying to get our nances back in order. What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council? : Taking care of our nances. I want to give something back to these people. Every place else has all types of festivals and I think New Miami needs to do their thing. The re department has a carnival. We need to give something back to this community. What is your opinion about New Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : There’s good people here. Once you get to know these people they’ll look out for you and each other. There’s pluses and minuses, but they are all good people all wanting the same thing: Getting New Miami cleaned up and looking better. Name : Patti Hanes Age : 37 Residency : New Miami Education : Talawanda High School Graduate, SOC, Center for Medical Services Full-time occupation : M.A., Phlebotomist (and a part-time waitress) Public of ces held : None What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a council member work to lessen that problem? : I feel the biggest problem on council now is: 1. Enforcement of ordinances and resolutions. 2. Communication. 3. Follow up with community complaints. 4. Council attendance. To x these problems in my opinion: 1. Work together with one another and the appropriate departments in the village to issue citations for violations of village ordinances and resolutions. 2. Follow up with some community action, get out in the community and see hands on problems and get resolutions, get the community involved. 3. I also feel if you make a four year commitment to the community you need to be present to make the changes, not empty promises and collect tax dollars for a job not done. What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council? : Our yearly balances and budgets for each department, we need our funds in order and appropriated in the correct departments and accounts, to know what we have to work with as far as repairs and hiring more help for our street departments and water departments, police departments, etc. To do the things that need done in the village, such as pothole repairs and alley way repair, our parks and recreation for our children and grandchildren, build a community center or recreational building. To research and receive grant money to make improvements. What is your opinion about New Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : My opinion about the Village of New Miami is it’s a lost gem just waiting to be found, I don’t want the village to be a Fair eld or a West Chester I want it to generate more revenue and business, but keep the village charm and have the respect it deserves. I want people to say its a beautiful little town, with great schools for my children, and I want to live there. Name : Robert Lee Henley Age : Declined to answer. Residency : Declined to answer Education : Declined to answer Full-time occupation : Declined to answer Public of ces held : Declined to answer What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a council member work to lessen that problem? : Declined to answer What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council? : Declined to answer What is your opinion about New Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : Declined to answer Name : Curtis Winkle Age : 39 Residency : New Miami Education : High school graduate Full-time occupation : Construction Public of ces held : None What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a council member work to lessen that problem? : Biggest problem is there’s not enough communication between the citizens and council. Main goal would be to get the community more involved in running the village and nd out why we have all this waste. There’s not much being done to bring in any kind of tax revenue. Every time they want to go for grants, for long term they need to try to bring some businesses in the area so you can have regular income in the village. What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council? : To get a few more council members on there that care about the village. What is your opinion of New Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : Most of the people here are good, down-to-earth people. That’s what brought me into New Miami. It’s a good place. Most people here are good neighbors. I think the people are good people. A good selling point would be New Miami’s school district. Name : John Lee Winter Age : 72 Residency : Declined to answer Education : Declined to answer Full-time occupation : Declined to answer Public of ces held : Declined to answer What do you feel is the biggest problem on council right now and how will having you as a board member work to lessen that problem? : Declined to answer What do you believe is the most immediate need on the New Miami Village Council : Declined to answer What is your opinion of new Miami? If you had to recruit someone to live in the area, how would you motivate them? : Declined to answer Contact Ken-Yon Hardy at (513) 820-2190, or e-mail him at khardy@coxohio.com. CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 Village Seven running for council seats GREG LYNCH/JOURNALNEWS AMTRAK WILL MAKE ITS LAST STOP at the station at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Henry Street today unless the city makes improvements to the hub. Hamilton Councilman James Noonan said the news is unfortunate, but questioned whether the service cutoff had much to do with the condition of Hamilton’s station. “They like to blame things on others. That is my personal opin - ion,” Noonan said. The stop was one of two Ohio stops on the Cardinal line, which runs 921 miles between Chicago and New York City. Those wishing to use the service will be directed to board instead in Cincinnati. Amtrak provides intercity passenger rail services to more than 500 destinations in 46 states on a 22,000-mile route system. Each day, about 66,000 people use Amtrak passenger service, which began in 1971. Contact Lisa A. Bernard at (513) 820-2186, or e-mail her at lbernard@coxohio.com. CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 Amtrak Train making last stop in Hamilton Dasha Giger didn’t care much for science before having Callahan as a teacher. Callahan makes science fun and now she likes “a lot of it,” Giger said. “She has taught us a lot in these past two years,” the eighth-grader said. “She’s nice … she’s hilarious, she’s a really cool person and teacher at the same time. She’s a beautiful person.” Because of her influence, Heidelberg said, “I am always going to try my very best on everything. I am never going to give 50 percent, I am always going to give the full 100 percent.” According to her peers, Callahan represents the epitome of inspiration and commitment in the classroom. Even though her battle with Multiple Sclerosis has confined her to a wheelchair, one of her colleagues says, “Her drive to help our students knows no bounds.” “Diane Callahan is truly deserving of this national recognition,” said Fairfield Superintendent Robert Farrell. “She is one of the most dedicated educators I know. She works tirelessly to find innovative ways to engage students in the learning process.” One of the things she said after she got the award was that she was glad she had nice clothes on, Farrell said. She could have just as easily had on a lab coat, he said. “She asks her students, ‘what are we going to discover today?’ and then takes them through the process,” he said. “She gets involved and just as excited as the kids do when she is performing the experiment or activity with them. She’s exciting to watch.” Callahan’s instruction, which integrates the inquiry method, is all lab-based. In her continuous effort to improve herself and her students, she recently identified a weakness in the school’s science curriculum and developed innovative instructional practices to strengthen it. “She makes science fun,” eighth-grader Alexa Sonderman said. “She has taught me more in the last two years than I’ve learned since first grade. “She is really dedicated to what she does.” Callahan also was honored as the 2004-05 Fairfield City School District Teacher of the Year and in November 2000 was awarded the Fullbright Memorial Fund Scholarship to study the Japanese education system. An independent blue ribbon panel, appointed by each state’s department of education, recommends recipients to the Milken Family Foundation. Criteria for the award include: • Exceptional educational talent, as evidenced by outstanding instructional practices in the classroom, school and profession; • Outstanding accomplishment and strong long-range potential for professional and policy leadership; and • An engaging and inspiring presence that motivates and impacts students, colleagues and the community. “We are grateful to the Milken Family Foundation for continuing to support teachers each year,” Zelman said. “The most important factor in student achievement is the quality of the teacher in the classroom, and I am pleased that the Milken Foundation is recognizing three of Ohio’s most outstanding examples of high quality instruction.” CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 Award Students, colleagues praise teacher When the family heard that Parks’ body would lie in honor at the Capitol, Cunningham said they immediately decided “We have to go.” Nearby, an impromptu choir of women - several still wearing their church hats - harmonized on hymns and songs from the civil rights movement. “Come on over to the front of the bus,” they sang. “I’ll be riding up there.” “We came because we have to give our last respects to Rosa,” said Sammie Whiting-Ellis, who lives in Washington, D.C., but said the impromptu singing group had members from Connecticut, California and “a Katrina survivor from New Orleans.” “Rosa Parks changed all our lives,” said Whiting-Ellis. “I think she was the one who triggered the whole civil rights movement,” said Sam Washington, a retired federal engineer from Washington, D.C. “She was the catalyst for all that came afterward and I think the whole of America was changed by her.” “My mom called me from New Jersey and said ‘You should go. This is an historic event’,” said Leilani Smith, a student at American University. The solemn ceremonies began with a military honor guard carrying the polished wooden casket to its resting place. A choir sang the “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Last June, Ronald Reagan became the most recent leader to receive such homage at the Capitol, following such notable Americans as Henry Clay, Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy and unknown soldiers from World Wars I and II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Parks’ coffin was flown to Baltimore/Washington International-Thurgood Marshall Airport Sunday after tributes in Montgomery. People in line began filing past the coffin in the Rotunda shortly after 8 p.m. and could continue until midnight. The viewing was scheduled to resume at 7 a.m. Monday and continue until 10 a.m. Then the coffin will be taken to the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church in Washington on Monday afternoon before being returned to Detroit for burial on Wednesday. After Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her bus seat, her preacher, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. took up her cause. The successful 381-day bus strike that followed was one of the key early events that fueled the civil rights movement that ended racial segregation. King later spoke about “Sister Pollard” - a 70-year-old woman who walked to work rather than ride a bus during the boycott that Parks had inspired. One day she was asked “aren’t you tired?” King said. “And with her ungrammatical profundity, she said, ‘My feets is tired, but my soul is rested’.” Half a century later, on an autumn Sunday in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol, another soul is rested. Earlier Sunday, hundreds of other mourners honored Parks at the St. Paul A.M.E. Church in Montgomery, Ala., where she was once a member. “I was here when Rosa Parks started and I just wanted to be here when she departed,” said the Rev. Joseph Lowery, who co- founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with King. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who attended the service in Montgomery, said she and others who grew up in Alabama during the height of Parks’ activism might not have realized her impact on their lives, “but I can honestly say that without Mrs. Parks, I probably would not be standing here today as secretary of state.” Alabama Gov. Bob Riley credited Parks with inspiring protests against social injustice around the world. “I firmly believe God puts different people in different parts of history so great things can happen,” Riley said. “I think Rosa Parks is one of those people.” This report was supplemented by material from The Associated Press . CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 Parks Civil rights figure lies in Capitol KEVIN WOLF/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FAMILY AND FRIENDS follow the casket of Rosa Parks as it is carried up the steps of the Capitol Sunday in Washington. Parks, who died Oct. 24 in Detroit, refused to give up her seat on a bus in 1955, sparking the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO ROSA PARKS is escorted by E.D. Nixon, former president of the Alabama NAACP, on arrival at the courthouse in Montgomery, Ala., March 19, 1956. Parks, whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man helped spark the modern civil rights movement, died Oct. 24 at 92.

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