The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 6, 1948 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, January 6, 1948
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Page 9
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TUESDAY, JANUARY «, 1948 BLITHBTILL1 (ARK.)' COURIBR BETTER HOMES ci '• Four-Point Plan Designed to Meet Currant Emergency Th« Board of Directors of The American Institute of Architects has adopted a four-point program designed to meet the housing emergency, Architects AdODt House Buyer Needs to Know New Construction u • * These Basic Structural Facts "-<-* D — J Housing Program To be sure of getting your money's worth in building or buying » house, you must know certain basic facts about the structure. Here are the most Important: FOUNDATION — In good construction, basement walls or the concrete slab floor ol a basement- less house rest on masonry footings which are wider than the wall and extend into the ground. BASEMENT — Water stains The program calls for an Intensive * walls or floor are sure signs of that the ed. In good construclion, basement is wsitcr proofed when the house is built. FRAMING—The framing system can be observed in unfinished basements and attics. Studs, Joists and raltcrs should be spaced no farther thnn 16 Inches, center to center. Joists should bo braced nt intervals by X-shnped bridging. Walls should be lire-stopped either with sollci blocks between studs or by fireproof insulation like mineral wool The house rests on wooden sills or top of the foundation. Look for dry rot and termite damage in sills b; shoving a knife blade into the wood If it slips in easily, the sill Is damaged and must be replaced. long, be. a steady and adequate, How of building materials, assuming! cations! training schools for buildlnt that the export of building materials mechanics. Better vocational school l> properly controlled. Equally 1m-! could'produce good mechanics mor portant with the increased produc- rapidly than present training meth tlon of materials, is the return to a more balanced production. In many cases the materials produced for and for heavy construction complementary, ^and they can conversion program to Increase the number of rental units in existing structures, and a two-year publicly financed housing program. The text of the Board's statement follows: '.The American Institute of Architects Is keenly aware of the housing shortage still confronting the country and of the high Importance of finding means of correcting it. For the information of its members and of the public, the Board of Directors.has adopted the following an emergen- recommendatlons for cy housing program: "Material shortages in the con- alructlon Industry are gradually being relieved and there should, before be produced more economically for both kinds of construction than if the production is restricted to one type or the other. Within a period of two or three years, baring any unforeseen development, there may be a reduction in the cost of building materials as a result of greater competition and greater production. "The shortage of skilled on-site labor Is a more serious deterrent to an adequate expansion of construction, and constitutes the No. 1 problem of the- building,Industry. We need,'Immediately, an improvement In the productivity of the limited supply of construction labor that is now available. In addition we must acelerate apprentice training and the acceptances of apprentices both employers and labor unions If we expect to meet the nation's accumulated construction needs. Ask More Vocational Training "Federal assistance is now given, on a .very substantial'scale to college training for veterans. A larger portion of the funds now made available for education and training of veterans should be used for developing ^jnd supporting more effective vo- ods if organized labor would adap its membership requirements to ac celerated training procedures. I Is essential that labor organizations take effective steps to raise the ef- FLOORS — The finished floor ihoulrt be laid on a rough subfloor. Absence of a subfloor denotes skimpy construction all through lh« house. If the subfloor Is laid diagonally It gives added strength and ndicates that construction throughout Is of top quality. The same Is Irue ol exterior wall sheathing. Floors should be strong, level and not springy. DOORS — Sagging or sticking doors usually Indicate continued settling of the house and this may indicate lack ot rfood foundation. All houses settle somewhat when firs', built, but, If doors keep slicking after adjustment and plaster cracks continue lo develop, you are headed for trouble. STAIRS — If stairs are springy and not level, this Indicates structural weakness. ROOF—Look for curled, split, loose, ur broken shingles by climbing up to the roof or Inspecting from an adjacent window. Examine the underside ol the root lor water stains, CONVENIENCES— Have heating and plumbing contractors cticck whether these systems are larije enough and efficient. Are there enough electrical outlets, closets and cupboards If the rest of the hou:;e Is sound but these facilities Inadequate, find out what it wlJI cost to supply them. flctency of labor and to edequntely increase the number of journeymen. Private initiative has marie start on overcoming the housing shortage. Liberal mortage provisions with Government guarantee to the loaning institution against loss has provided generally adequate funds for fnancing. One of the greatest Four Permits for Small Buildings Issued Here Four building permits, represent- only an estimated $2600 expenditure for planned building, were Issued during last week from the of- lice of City Engineer Joe Carney. They were issued to the following: Cecil Home, for a one-room frame residence on East Coleridge; estimated cost. $400. Robert McClatchey, lor a 28 by 40-ioot frame auto repair shop building at First and Coleridge; deterrents to construction, particlai- j estimated cost, 5800. ly of rental housing, is the failure] Mrs. Kelton Francis, for a two- to announce a definite program for room frame beauty parlor in the the gradual raising of rental ceilings I rear ol 310 East, Dougan; estimated and their ultimate elimination. We therefore urge, as one of the most j effective incentives to private con- | struction. the gradual raising of rental ceilings and the ultimate elimination of all rent controls. The transportation should be made carefully, however, In order to avoid creating inflationary tendencies sufficient to precipitate a new round of increases in \v;sges and prices. "Under the present F. H. A. Title VI procedure and the Veterans' Housing Program, the Federal Government takes most of the risks ^f present construction costs; but these programs have provided pratically no housing for families of low income. cost, $1.000. G. J. Byrci. for a one-room frame office at 503 East Main; estimated cost, $400. May Set Record, Experts Declare NEW YORK, Jan. «. (UP)—New construction throughout the United States in 1048 may be the greatest In the nation's history, In the opinion of building Industry lenders. The country has Just completed » j'fBr «f record building, amoun'. K to $18,706.000.000, according lo Government utlmateu, and the ex- perls say the 1947 )>eak figure will be surpassed by a wide margin. To bear this out, Harold R. Berlin, vice president or Johns-Man ville Corporation, In his year-end statement, said that, "if business In general remains at a high level next year «nrt the building industry exercise* restraint in the mat- ler of casts and prices, approximately $15.000,000.000 of new construction appears entirelv possible." Berlin added that "together with SS.WO.OOO.OOO to $6.000.000,000 of repair maintenance and remodelling construction, a $30,000.000,000 year Is entirely possible." He further pointed out tlml in order to nllnln the $20,000.000.000 flBiirc the building industry must hurdle Mich obstacles ns threats of governmental controls, labor unrest, shortages and inflation. "The biggest factor," he addfd, ".should be residential as here the need Is greatest. Residential expenditures should run at least $1,000,000.000 more than in [9ft." In 1947, private residential construction alone amounted to $4,233.000,000, setting a record for this type of building Mid contrasted with the depression low of $718,000,000 In 1833. Public utility construction ii> 1947 rose to $1.275.000,000 from $85«.000,000 in 1046. Private non-resldcnti»l construction was the only section of the building to slip off In 1947. Volume in that group amounted to $3JOT.000,000. compared with 1,350.000.000 ill the year hefore. Miscellaneous construction which, includes farm. Federal, state and municipal building and Federal work relief, in 1047 rose to $3,391.003.000 from $2.501.000.000 In 19*«. Maintenance lor trie pisl ye»T amounted to $6.500.000.000 compared with $5,6CO,000.000 a year earlier. Plaster Imitates Stone, Wood and Metal Getting plailered artistically ih« ambition of awanky new dwell-. hits who have heard ol the wli- rdry of reinforced plaster iluil createa durable decorative touches, reporU Practical Builder, Chicago 3. Adaptable to many finishes, ornamental wall bracketa, fireplaces, chandeliers, tables, frame< and ba- lustradea look so much like marble, line grain woodft, bronw or antique gold that only an expert can sea the "common" plaster Inside. Perfected after long experiments and (cst.s, the originator of this new I) I process ha-s adopted it to unusually br.iulllul home accessories. Resisting chipping anil deterioration, Iho Ub'.es, lighting llxtures, slalr balustrades ace not only exceptionally attractive bill, are lonK-lasllng.strong. Furniture Unharmed If Near Gonvectors Because inn rmimm heat entitled by the new-typo convecUvr radla- Hcating Units Smaller Trends in the heating and ventilating field, say.s the Plumbing and Heating Industries Bureau, show the demand for small units which get the greatest efficiency out of fuel and operate under rigid automatic control. Popularity ol bolt- er-burner units for radiant heating is increasing. Radiant heating is flexible and its advantages may be. obtained with radiators, baseboards, panels, or convectors. STOP FOOLING WITH COAL INSTALL IN YOUR FURNACE KRESKY PRICES INCLUDE THERMOSTAT and AUTOMATIC CONTROL $9335 BUY FROM YOUR LOCAL HEATING EQUIPMENT DEALER Sma8 Horn* Sim 3-Bedroom HOUM Size M09 85 SSIrsL... M20 85 JESSE W PROVINCE PLUMBING AND HEATING " Phone 2719 Blythev'ille Krf«ky Floor Furnaces and Space Healers Fire Damage Reaches Peak In U.S. in '47 NEW YORK, Jnn. 6 —Property damage from fire In the U. 3, was 10 per cent more in 1947 Uian evpr before, according to BUSINESS WEEK. "By Dec. 1, fire damage already amounted to $6!44-mlllion. Worst previous years were 1940 and 192(3. \villi $561-million In losses both years. One big reason (or the In| crease In losses Is, of course, that property values hftve gone up. Also. I due lo the bulldinR shortage, warehouses that five years ago would have been only about half-lull are crowded now. 'The year 1947 also DRW * record number of 'conflagrations,' tne ! term the fire Insurance business applies to fires Involving * property loss of |l-milllnn or more. Thirty- three such flre.i In the year caused ft total eiUlmntert property damage of over *100-m!ll!on. And there have been more just plain fires, too. Some of the under-wrlters' reasons a re: "(I) Fire departrnenU and water supply systems haven't been able to keep up with property expansion. There Is a shortage of new fire fighting equipment and many cities have outgrown their water supply. "(2) Industrial and home maintenance B below par. Heating, mechanical, and electrical equipment has been opera ting full blast. In many cases there hasn't been the time or the manpower Available that is needed to keep equipment in proper shape. "(3) There is a tendency for high- value buildings—factories, supermarkets, bowling alleys—to move outside of big-city limits, farther from firehouses. One-third of the year's 'conflagrations' took place In towns of IQjOOO population or under. "(4) There hasn't been enough attention to safety in the UJ»R of new industrial processes and materials." SAVE MONEY... ON A JOB WELL DONE! COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL WIRING OUR SPECIALTY! Any electric job, no matter how large or small, will be Riven every consideration and the henefit of our fine workmanship. You're 8«f« wilh our guarantee (o back up (he work w« do ... REMEMBER—. "SERVICE IS NOT OUR MOTTO, IT'S OUR BUSINESS!" 116 North Pint Str««t CHARLIE'S ELECTRIC SHOP 299S YOU'VE READ ABOUT THEM NOW You Can Have One RIGHT HERE IN BLYTHEVILLE Smithway Glass-lined Water Heaters! An Electric Healer that Does the Job! 50 Gallon Heater $175 30 Gallon Heater $145 ALSO— 50 (inlliin Smithwny Rcnuliir Wilier Heulers Metal Tank $130 Call on us for all your plumbing and Heating Needs! JESSE W. PROVINCE or*, nuw coming Into lncr«uln(l; UIn hue, in relatively low In InUn- slly-oiily nlwiit 15 per cent of th« .otnl output ol he«t—(urnlture c«n je lonitccl closfi to cnnvfclor front! without (limner ol extreme drying or wnvplng ol wood. Taljlen »r« Irt- pU«*4 «rMttr Ik ; eoMtcton wtth M i or (Inlah, u>4 con»»ctor drtp*rl«t ••• h* hupc fNr ( t«r *n<to without taMrtHl MM fttota.' 127 Plumbing and Heat-ing Eiisl Vine Street I'hmic 271!) ALUMINALL SCREENS See the beautiful new all-aluminum • Permanent • Beautiful • Dye Rolled Aluminum From* • 16 Meth Aluminum Wi • fconomical — Free Estimate! — Deal's Paint Store "Your Wallpaper Style Center" 1.09 Enst Mrtln PtlMM People in every walk of life— about 3,000,000* of them-own the business-managed electric companies *AND YOU" are probably one of another 72,000,000 indirect owners, through your bank savings or life insurance premiums. Much of this money of yours it put to work, by banks and insurance companies, in electric company securities. These companies, lhat serve nearly everybody are owned by nearly everybody! What affects them affects you. • Listen to the Electric Hour—The Hour of Charm, Sundays, 4:30'P. M, CST, CM. Arfc-Mo. Power Co.

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