The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 31, 1947 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, December 31, 1947
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Page 3
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER §1, 194T BLYTHRVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Governor Loney CQ//S Wallace An 'Outcast' and Says Party To Be Better Oii Without Him B.v BOB BROWN I'niled I'rem Staff Correspondent LITTLE HOCK. Ark., Dec, 31. CTJ.P,)—Arkansas Republicans were. o]>en]y Jubilant today over Henry Wallace'* third party unuomicemrnt, but Democratic majority party leaders registered complete indifference. £ Oov. ncn Laney, IOIIR an outspoken critic of the former vice- president, termed Wallace's announcement the action of a "disgruntled Individual." Jk_ , _ "Mr. Wallace now l.s an outcast of bolli the Republican and the Democratic parties." Lnncy said, "and I can't see that either party has the lisht lo criticize th e other; for his actions." | Ttie governor saitl recently he j would not walk across the street j to hear Wallace, speak. He termed him a "complete obstructionist." "I believe the Democrats nve del-! Initcly better off without him." Lnncy declared. "Unfortunately, he has held high governmental posts and may carry some votes." IJenouncerl hv McClflhin U.S. Sen. John'L. McCldlnn de l - nmmcerl Wallace and his new and as yet unnamed party. "Paraphrasing the old sentence. 'Now Is the time for all good men lo come to (he aid of their party'. I would say. 'Now is the time for all good Russians and Communists to eome to the aid of the ne\v im-lyV'McClcllan said when contacted in Hot Springs. Arkansas' senior senator, always i an open foe of Communism, added: ! Use of Grain By Distillers Is Restricted WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 The govern men t I oda y orders whi.sky production cut down (o save Gals Roast and Boast on Either Coast PAGE TORE* j Secretary of Agriculture Cllntoi ! P. Anderson put nil distillers nndei 11 grain-use rationing system \vhic'n will limit grain consumption t 2,4nO,000 bushels between now am Feb. 1. Anderson l.ssncd the order within an hour alter President Truman siRiiecl the Republican anti-Inflation i bill. That measure gave the govern-1 ment authority to restrict use of grain by distillers. The authority expires Feb. 1. The distilled spirits Institute said the order will reduce whiskey pro- w;™^'^"';;! srsi ™> * »••-«« 1^,..- idc'iitify thosR who definitely sym- pathise with Russia in her program of expansion and conquest." Wallace Town.scncJ, Republican n;Hional commitleeman from Ejtt- Ue Rock snlri he believed Wallace's announcement will improve Republican chances of carrying the k.cy New York, California nnd Shoe Production Decline Predicted for New Year « '.tales of Michigan May Get Name on Br.llot BOSTON. Dec. 31 <UP)— Shoe production throughout the natio i will decrease In 1348 as result of completion of inventories at ah levels and a drop In retail salej, Executive Vice President Maxwcil Petrillo Edict On Recordings Causes Big Rush ity VlrilnU Macl'limum II'!' llollywuiMi Cnrr? N|)»inlriil) HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 31 (UP>The 2'1-limir ticdlnm In (ho recording Mudlo.s sUiii.s fur kecus nl mid- rrlRlil. And U win be the. first Hum In ninny a week thnl the lnnll<>i''i nnd the Knmnns luive heen off their feel. They're bleary-eyed, luinrse, .sleepy, nnd dend-beat liylnK tt> net ail (heir recordings made before James C'aisar Pelrlllo's bnn stops union musicians from recording "for nil tlino." OiKnnl.st Illiui chinle.s nude 7ii sides In 5 hours nnd fnur minutes. Thflt's the record, so liir. Mast o( the blg-mimc vocalists an- so busy jillliiK up plnllers lluvv need lielii to wobble up lo a mike so they run slim ute.tly for the ciu- lomnr.s—who won't be inlying some of their wares until way Into nc\i lint I'otrlllD's tut 'cm nil scored to dentil. They hoiiiselv rcfu.se lo say wlwl Uicy tblnVc urjonl his ban. They jnsl mnkc music like cru/.y. I'clrlllo siiy.s he's imlliiwlnu new recordings becnuse "ciiniu'd music' IHK.S his um.siclnns out of u Job. Bin they're luivlng no trouble ucli work lhc.se ciny.s—Una's fur .sin Kvei ylindy from Ulnn Cro.sby Ic. • Kriink Sluiitrn lo Dinnh Bliore |,>I I Jo Htnfford hns been wm-blliiK innl ' jiluwil llic.sc pu.st few weeks. They're Inuisry (or .sleep. | Bill. Ilicy're lum«ilcr for lho:,e I royiilllles they wunldifi. lie KcllliiK afler toiiny If Ihcy didn't Rive ,, m 1 wllli 11 ycur's supply of lunes now York, they're talking about the day they buih snowmen in Times Square, as Hrauuli-Ue Fischer demonstrates at left On (he same dny. they had H iu>n|. wave lu southern California, and Htiulet Krlstlne Miller roasted wieners at Maliuii Dearh. New York:,'.,.8-Inch snuwliill eruckcd all records for Ilic inelrop- olis, and even eclipsed the famous Illiquid oi iniili. ri«,i_.,.,,_j| cline from the record production, of designated I 52g9( , 3000 |mjrs ^ mf] 'I'ownscnd admitted that u third Field of the New England Shoe <Sc party would have little effect in i— traditionally Democratic Arkansas state in the Southeast." "1 believe he will break up the I The states' man of th« year Joci seil rc P'' psn!ltcrt coalition of Southern Democrats. Hli f „ . ' ' - city machine Democrats and the ''"'"" OI oratlj radical elements which have been OI Arkansas, using the Democratic party." he ' said. i Meanwhile, Attorney General Guy ! E. Williams was studying the law i to determine just how Wallace can j get his name on the state's general election hallot. I Apparently, Williams said, two ] steps are open: . He can form a state chapter of his new party and be nominated by convention; Or he can be certified to the sec- • rctary of state by a petition con- 1 taininir he names of at least 50 Leather Asociatson predicted tmlay He estimated the nation's shoe production In 1B48 will total .|;i:i,- OOO.OOQ pairs as cnmpiired with •!G5 1 000,000 In 1947. The I'.HI (inure U- J2 per cent de- Brothcrs Play With Rifle; \ H-yenr-old brother. oilo'JV. One Dies of Built Wound ' Pollce R '" <h " ( ' d l " 1 ' lw " b "- vs '"" 1 CICALA, I-'lii., Ijir. 31 UJ|>i.-iM'- fh;iel Wettsteln, Kl-vc'nr-dlcl son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Wetlslein lit. died here yesterday from n bullet wound accidentally inllkled by his Meat Rationing Urged WASHINGTON, Dec. Ill lUI'l- -Srn. Arllmr V. Walkln.s. u Utah, uincd today thai the nutloiV leinin lo meat rationing luimi-d- lately uiv mi c((oil to vrdnri: soariiiR prices. H " Is I lie third liepiililican .scnnl<ir whu has urned meat ni- lloning in rei-eiu weeks. [ been pliivlng with n .22 cnlllx-'r rl- I lie In Hie buckyard of their .slib- urbiin home. '1'ln- yonnirer brother i nrrlvnl nt the hnsiUlul rued the rillle und sold the bullet' " ' ricoctn;tcd nnd struck the Imi-k of the heail. 'I'he older brother was dead me members of the fam- Die buy: Michael In > lly which owns the Florida Telephone Cm p.. servlnR Uic cenlriil part of the. stale. qualified electors in the state. Tourist City Applauds Failure oi Science To Produce Snowflqkes. ST. PETERSBURG. Pin., Dec. 31 'Urt—Operation Snowflakc. an attempt to make it snow over this "sunshine city" by dry-Icing clouds, was hailed as a success today. It didn't snow. That, said city publicity director Pressly Phillips, was exactly what he wanted to prove that even thc- best efforts of science would not produce snow for this Gulf Coast tourist center. Pilot Bob Leon took off with 10 1 ) pounds of dry ice nnd dropped U in the right sort of stratus-cumu- lus clouds at 12,000 feet, in 31 degree weather. He dived beneath the clouds, but found no snow faltnif;. An accompanying plane also failed to notice snow, and the dry ice apparently evaporated before hitting the ground. Some street observers who knew the -stunt was being tried, after perfect weather spoiled chances for a white Christmas last week, thought that it had worked, so fast did the. clouds disappear when Leon reached them. But he took no credit, and Phillips was glad to call it a failure. Arkansan Honored BIRMINGHAM. Ala.. Dec. 31 I UP) -.The magazine. Progressive. Farmer, today announced its 15141 selection; tor the. man of the year in the South and in each Southern slate. Dr. Paul w. Chapman, dean of the College of Agriculture at. the University of Georgia, was named the "man of the year in service to the agriculture of the South" for his contribution to the "growth of rural industries In nearly every Arkansas - DESERVES THE BEST - - * We Give Yon B 0 D R B 0 H At I j Best S T R A*l 6 H T from KENTUCKY 700 1'rm.f Sour Mtt.ih Ask For It Hi VOUK PACKACU STORK ELLDW5TONE BOTTLED IN BOND Also Black T.abet— 90 Proof Barrett Hamilton, Inc. DMrihnlor, F.iKle R,x-lt I I l I l I I I l l I I I f I i I I l l I • l I l l l I l l I l I I I I l I I III III 111 l l l l « I I I l I I I I I I 1 l I ill III I I I I I I 1.1 I. II I I 1 I I I I III l I I l l I 111 III llil • ill llil Illl l I I III I I I l I I ill llil Illl I l l i Illl III III III ill i I I l I I i l I l l I l l I l I I Illl IIII iiii iiii iiii iiii iiii l i i t iiii iiii iiii 1111 1111 1111 IT'S PLANTERS IN '48! • i l l • ill • l i i lili llil Illl Illl llil llil iiii i i i • lili llil III! Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl I I t I Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl • I I I Illl Illl Illl I I I I Production is (he word lluil will lie synonymous with piwifss in I!HS. The crying nrrd of (h« world can only he met ny more and more uroduetinn. However, nationwide polls slum Ilial the American i>eo|ilc as a whole, folks like yon nnd me, are becoming more and more choosy as lo the ((iialily of merchandise they buy. That's why we stale simply: "It's Planters in "IS!" (Inr fine line of 1'annius/ Itrand Merchandise, hardware and appliances, will lie your best liny in 19IS as it lias been in the year AUTO UPHOLSTERY SHOP A» LEE MOTOR SALES, Inc. 307 East Main Street Phone 519 Yen, we do all kinds V n'liio iipholslurlni?, using only tht most durable nnd pfenning materials. \VP. make seal covers tailored to fit your cushions. Also door panels, baclt panels and arm rests tlmt will brliiK ruldcd comfort and real charm to the Interior of your car. We also do headlining, serinn lop-decking nnd cohvetti- > e Kips. We rebuild (ruck deals, fit rubber mats; cut. fit and bind back seat carpets. We nl.so do heavy duty custom dewing 1*1 yiiur Auto Upholstery troubles lie our troubles O ' lr ' ..... ""' ^'"Islmin and holiday (pedal: Frit* rfducllon •• nil sen-lees and material*. Come In for estimates. It Is a pleasure to seiv» you u our work will be n pleasure to you. Thomas J. Lilly & Son For the Best in Tailored Auto Trim HARDWARE CO.Inc. HOME OF FAMOUS BRANDS " 126 W. MAIN ST. __ PHONE 515 IIII IIII IIII I I i I IIII IIII IIII IIII IIII I i I • Ilil Illl I I I I Illl IIII Illl Illl I I t I I I t I Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl Illl I i I r Illl III! I i i r I i r i iiii iiii l t i i I r : I I ) : I i i r < ill' iiii i i t i iiii Iiii Illl Iiii iiii llil till llil • l i l iiii • ill • i l i • ill iiii iiii llil llil l t i i iiii lili i l t l lill lili iiii litl Illl llil llil Illl lili lili Illl lili llil ill! Illl Illl Illl 'lili Illl Illl BEN WHITE & SONS GENERAL CONTRACTORS MAIN OFFICE NORTH TENTH Phone 3151 FARM (Jp LOANS Honi< Oftio, Niwutk, N. J. LONG TEftM PROMPT C1OIINO LOW KATE CAM., ViKVIK OK SPI! RAY WORTHINGTON US S. Third St., Hrjrthivllle, Art. Srrvlni This Sre.llnti Z.< Ur»n Authorised Mr>rrvnf • Loan SalMhtr tor THK rKuiiF.MiAt. INSI:RAM:B V C<>MI'ANV or AMERICA STUDEBAKERS 5 CHAMBLIN SALES CO. 5 T") Salai * STUDEBAKER * Servlc* D *^ Knjoy surely .mil jicitre ot mind tlnuinh rveolar car ^_ E lnspccllor,. . t* • 1'iit in (Jooil Itttnnin^ Or<icr ' B « New l'«iiit Jnl> H • Clicok Kk'i'lriciil Syslcm _ • lirnkc l.ininjf anil Sfecrinjr « ** A Bood nt«otlon oJ urw >nd ui«d truck*. Al*>, & ruunbcr E Kallr«>4 anl Aih 8U«H< . T^ B • <••• _ [,*x Chnmhlin ( Dial 219S Rill ChamhUn O S T U D E B A K E RS _ "You'd think (lie boy voted mosl-likcly-to-succoed would be Kmart enough to lake his car to SHAY MOTORS for check-tins!" First National insurance Agency FOR COMm-ITE PROTECTION Phono 23U 108 North 2nd St. BILL WILSON ^ CHARLES BITTNER

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