The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 27, 1955 · Page 11
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 11

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, April 27, 1955
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Page 11
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BOAT, APRIL if, MM BLTOTflUI (AWL) COUBHB NEW8 PAGE ELEVEN Antonelli Whiffs Bob Thomson Twice as Old Debate Renews Bf ED WILKI Tbe AMOclated Prm Charlie Grimm watched the rain bounce off the sidewalks of New York from his hotel room yesterday afternoon and figured both his Milwaukee Braves and his ulcers were in good shape, what with Bobby Thomson hitting and all, Jolly Cholly sgreed with preseason talk that had his guys winning the National league pennant. And he was sure the Johnny An- tonelli-for-JThomson deal with the Giants was about to swing in Milwaukee's favor at last. A year ago, of course, Thomson was useless with a broken ankle while Antonelli was the pride of New York's pitching itaff u the Giants swept to the world title. "Thomson already has won two games for us in the field," said Charlie, "and three with his bat." That accounted for five of the seven won by second-place Milwaukee so far. .It might have been six games chalked up for Thomson last night —except for a guy named Antonelli. The young lefty, beaten in his BulletBobHurisYanks Back into League Lead CHICAGO (AP) — Bullet Bob Turley, whose 14 victories last year barely pulled the Baltimore Orioles into seventh place, pitched the New York Yankees into first place yesterday for the first time suite 1953. The 24-year-old speed ball king* limited the Chicago White Sox to jne hit for a 5-0 ! victory and his third triumph under the Yankee banner. It was the first Yanks- Sox game of the year. Turley, who led 11 h e American I League with 185 | strikeouts and il81 walks last ? year, was in typ- ) leal form as he . Hurled the first me-hitter in the Bob TurleT major leagues this year. He fanned 10 and walked nine but never was in serious trouble. Three Yankee double plays took care of that. "We've quite a defensive ball club," said Turley. "I was never worried. All I felt I had to do was keep pitching." "Believe me, it's quite a difference to have the Yankees behind you. In three games they've got me something like 25 runs. With Baltimore I only had six runs in my first three games last year." Turley wouldn't commit himself as to how many games he thinks he can win with the Yankees, but said, "A man can't help winning with that kind of hitting and defense behind him." Fights Lost Night By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Houston, Tex. — Joey Giambra, 160, Buffalo, N. Y. outpointed Jimmy Welch, 162, Columbus, Ohio, 10. Richmond, Calif. — Tony Dupas, Pelicans Atop Southern League At LR's Expense BY [THE ASSOCIATED PRESS New Orleans apparently aims at grabbing the Southern Association pennant by whaling the daylights out of the undernourished Little Bock Travelers. The Pels, clinging to a narrow lead over Memphis and Atlanta, beat the cellar-dwelling Rocks last night 4-1, marking their fourth consecutive triumph over the thinly manned Arkansas line. New Orleans has won two of three from fifth-place Mobile and split eight decisions with Memphis. A hoary baseball maxim hinges the winning of pennants on ability to cuff the lower echelon, Atlanta and Memphis, deadlocked in second place, a halfgame off the pace, also read the script. The Crakers backed Murray Wall's stingy pitching with a 6-1 victory over seventh- place Nashville while Memphis cuffed fifth-place Mobile 6-2. Chattanooga blanked Birmingham 6-0 on Al Sima's fiix- hltter. 141, New Orleans, outpointed Leonard Oaines, 136'/i, Richmond, 10. London — Bandy Turpin, 171%, London, knocked out Alex Buxton, 162%. London, a. (for British light- heavyweight title) two previous starts, put down the Braves with three hits in « S-2 New York victory. And he made Thomson, tied for the league lead in runs batted in (17), look like just another batter. Thomson Fanned Twice Twice he fanned Thomson, who went hitless in four trips. In the eighth, a rally fizzled as Thomson dribbled the ball in front of ihe plate for the final out with the iying rim on third. That was the only National League game played, with rain and cold putting the rest on the shelf. But the American got off all four games, topped by Bob Turley's one-hit pitching in a 5-0 victory over the .Chicago White Sox that moved the New York Yankees into first place, one game up on the Sox. Boston had a chance to tie the Yankees, but dropped one to Kansas City 8-7 in 11 innings. That tied the Red. Sox for third with Cleveland's Indians, who beat Washington 3-3 as Bob Lemon won his fourth with a home run. 4th Straight Polo Defeat Al Kaline's ninth-inning blast beat Baltimore for Detroit 3-2. Yesterday's was the fourth straight Polo Grounds defeat for the Braves, who won every road series but the one in New York last year. New York had it three runs on a walk and four singles before Bob Buhl had retired a man. That did it. After the second, the Giants didn't make a hit off Buhl and two relievers. Dave Jolly and ace Warren Spahn. Hank Aaron tripled home the first Braves run in the third and they got another in the eighth on Aaron's single and a pair it infield outs with the help of an error and a passed ball. Turley's Total Goes to 27 Turley ran his strikeout total, tops in the majors, to 27, whiffing 10. It was his third decision without defeat. Sherm Lollar's single in the second was the only hit he allowed, although he walked nine The Sox's .right-hander tactics against the Yanks failed. Mike Fornieles was tagged for three runs in the first. The Sox lost shortstop Chlco Carrasquel, who was spiked on the ankle by Hank Bauer in a double-play breakup Boston's relief pitching, by Russ Kemmerer and Tom Hurd, no-hil the A's from the fourth to the llth Then Joe Astroth tripled and Jim Finigan smacked a single to wii it after Kurd loaded the bases in tentionally. ''inlgnn also homeret for three runs in the first. Tom Gorman was the winner, coming on in relief as Boston tied it il the eighth at 7-all against Ar Ditmar, who replaced starter Arnie Portocarrero. 8 Goodyear Service Store NEEDS 500 USED TIRES NOW BIG TRADE IN ALLOWANCE SALE DRIVE IN — LET US APPRAISE YOUR OLD TIRES "WE'LL DEAL — NO OBLIGATION" REGISTER NOW FREE! ou may win o «° * GIVFM AWAY and Register now. ' FREE! NOTHING TO BUY!— JUST REGISTER! FREE! You may win o set of tour Goodyear Passenger Tires thi * week ~~ fa <om * '" FREE! GOOD/YEAR SERVICE STORE 41OW. Main Phone 2-2492 Western NL Clubs Won't Be Patsies Again, Stanky Says PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Western clubs in the N»- ional League aren't going to be patsies for the Eastern teaini his year says Eddie Stanky, manager of the St. Louis Cardinals. ' TOP WEIOHTMEN — The trio shown above leads Blythevllle's Chlckataw tracK • squad in weight events, including the shot put and discus. The Chicks go to Jonesboro Friday for the Dis- trict track and field meet Shown above are (left- to-rittht) John Pong, Jodie Hall and Jimmy Tremain. Not in the picture is Allan Shanks, top Chick shot put artist. (Courier News I'hoto) Kansas City Signs Vic Raschi KANSAS CITY (/PH-The Kanos City Athletics, attempting to olster their weak pitching staff, ave signed 36-year-old right- ander Vic Raschi. The onetime New York Yankee .tching ace was released last week y the St. Louis Cardinals who ob- jiined him from the Yanks in 1954 or about J85.000. The A's did not disclose his con- jact terms, but it was under- load . they were conditional. He as on the Card payroll at about 33,000. Back Trouble Raschi had back trouble during prlng training. He worked only •e innings on the Grapefruit cir- it and was belted hard In his only start for the Cards during the regular season. * "I'm glad we made the deal," _jid A's Manager Lou Boudreau last night. He said he knew notli- ng of Raschi's present physical condition but planned to give him every opportunity to prove his contention he can still win in the majors. Raschi, conesus, N. Y., told Kansas City owner Arnold Johnson before signing yesterday his arm was sound and he was certain he could take a regular turn on the mound. The deal, was consumated by long distance telephone. Kansas City pitching has been on the weak side since the season opened. Alex Kellner Is the onls pitcher who has hurled a complete game. Bruton Credits His Hitting to Laying Off Bad Pitches NEW YORK (in - Bill Bruton hitting almost 10 points above hi lifetime average at .333, credits his early season success to "laying off the bad pitch." The fleet Milwaukee centorflold er said last ninht he hart openei up his stance a little and adoptei Last yea/ the Eastern teams, Brooklyn. New York, Philadelphia nd Pittsburgh won 185 from the Vest and lost 107. Fifty six of hese losses were by last place 'ittsburgh. West Stronger But all that will change this •car, Stnnky declared yesterday ifter the Cardinals' game here vlth the Phillies was rained out. 'The West looks much stronger me." Stanky said. "Bobby Thomson has made a big Improve- nent in Milwaukee. "The Chicago Cubs are much mproved. •Cincinnati has gotten off to a slow start, but the Reds will be lilting and they will cause plenty of trouble with that power." What about Stanley's Cards? Weakness Strengthened "We have been strong where I thought we would be weak, names', In the relief pitching. Frank Smith, Horb M o f o r d , George Schultz and Bobby Tleffenauer txve till done splendid work in re- let." The western clubs, invading the Enst yesterday for the first 11)55 East-West contests, hod little chance to back up Stanky's forecasts. Three games went by the boards due to bad weather. In tht 'oiirth game, the world champioi New Y6rk Giants defeated the Mil- vnukce Braves, the West's No. 1 challenger, 3-2. Bob Lemon of the Cleveland Indians likes to pitch at night. During 1054 the big righthander won 10 games and lost only one under the lights. Two umpires In the American League are former grid players for Ihe Now York Qinnts In tho NFL. They are Hank Soar and Frank Umont. a half crouch at the plate, "They've been getting me out for two years with that high pilch," .he said. "I made up my mind to lay off. 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