Daily News from New York, New York on February 3, 1980 · 334
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Daily News from New York, New York · 334

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New York, New York
Issue Date:
Sunday, February 3, 1980
Page:
334
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DAILY NEWS.-SUNPAV, FEBRUARY 3. 1980 This Ms, Old Glory won't be seeincQi39 Old Glory on Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in 1976 before winds kept it pinned to bridge cables and it was torn to pieces. Verrazano Bridge again will be flying world's biggest American flag on 4th By MIGUEL PEREZ Remember the attempt to hang Old Glory on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on July 4, 1976? Well, hang in there they're going to try it again this Independence Day. . The stars will be 13 feet across, the stripes will be 411 feet long and the "Great American Flag" will weigh seven tons. It will be the world's largest American flag, bigger and better than the mammoth flag that was blown into pieces after it was raised on the bridge for the 1976 Bicentennial Op SaiL : ; - - And this time, the makers insist, it won't rip apart. - The new flag, 20 stories high and two city blocks long, is being sewn together by a textile firm in Evansville, Ind. The six persons who are working on it expect to be finished in the middle of March and the flag will be installed on the bridge in June, according to the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority. David Baxley, a spokesman for the authority, said the flag is being manufactured by a nonprofit group called theGreat American Fund Inc., which will pay the estimated $400,000 cost of making the flag with donations from the American people. He said "the group is relying on individual and corporate gifts of money, goods and services-. Using 10,000 pounds of yarn Baxley said Milliken Inc. is knitting the fabric, using 10,000 pounds of Allied Chemical's high-tenacity polyester yarn. Other textile firms are supplying threads, reinforcing tape and fabric dyes. The Great American Fund says the flag will be "a gift from the people of America" and has launched a fund-raising drive to get the money it needs to complete the project. Donations can be sent to P.O. Box 7480, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10017. - A group of volunteer technical experts will be in Evansville Thursday to inspect the flag and New York community leaders will be shown how the flag is being made on Friday, Baxley said. - , . . The first flag which was 193 feet high and 366 feet long was blown to shreds when it became caught on the bridge cables,and there was no way to lower it, although in theory the flag was supposed to lower itself by its own weight when the supports were released. However, winds of 8 to 10 mph kept the flag pinned against the bridge cables until it was torn to pieces. , Baxley said the new flag 210 feet high and 411 feet long will be mounted on a reinforced steel grid that will keep it away from the cables, and which can be lowered when desired.. He said the flag will be raised on national holidays and as a welcome to visiting heads of state. He said the makers expect the flag to last 10 to 15 years. - Fear 10 dead in N.M. jail; 13 guards held (Continued from page 2) ' force the issue would be made by law enforcement officials. "The final decision is not mine. Ill just back up the professionals," he said. Warden Jerry Griffin said he did not want to take any "drastic action with lives at stake." King said after talking with the inmates he still was unclear about what the problem was. . "There weren't any specific demands," King said. "They said they were treated like kids and not like men." The governor said he had no plans to meet in person with the inmates, and that they had not asked him to. "It wouldn't be of any benefit for me to be in there instead of out here," he said. . - A negotiator for the inmates, who identified himself as "Chopper One." told authorities by two-way radio that the remaining 13 hostages would be "snuffed out" if the police tried to free the hostages, said State Police Capt. Bob Carroll. Gov. charts high frees course again By PETER SLOCUM Albany . (News Bureau) Gov. Carey isn't proposing to raise taxes this year, but he's planning a slew of fee hikes that will jack up the cost of everything from birth certificates to licenses for private detectives. ' Carey figures the higher fees will net $25 million and help him balance his $13.8 billion budget. Arguing that the hew fees more "accurately reflect" state costs, Carey wants to boost: ; A birth certificate from $2 to $5. A barber's license from $6 to $20. A private eye's license from $200 to $300. An auto title from $1.50 to $2.50. A motorboat license from $3 to $9 for small boats and from $10 to $30 for boats over 26 feet . . A bingo operator's license from $120 to $18.75. -... A boxer's license from $5 to $10. . - A marriage certificate and license from $4 to $10. A funeral home's initial fee from $25 to $200. A real estate sales license from $10 to $20. And, the list goes on. It is essentially a repeat of the list Carey offered last year, only to have it rejected by the Legislature. Predictions are that Carey's list will have a rough welcome again this year. Since most of the fees hit members of organized groups-such as real estate agents rather than consumers, the Legislature is certain to hear loud objections to the increases. Curiously, there is one fee on the list that Carey wants to eliminate. " ' Would drop outdated fee That's the $10 fee the state now charges restaurants that serve oleo margarine instead of butter, or along with nutter. The fee is a holdover from the days when state laws were designed to protect the dairy industry from "the : low-priced spread." It turns out that Carey was questioned . about the oleo fee by a reporter last year, and he decided to kill it. So when it showed up on the list of fee hikes again this year, he ordered it stricken. Parents say sons tried to kill them Indianapolis (AP) Two brothers, 15 and 17, have been arrested after : their parents told polke the youths repeatedly had tried to kill them by lacing their coffee with rat poison and gunpowder and by setting the house on fire, police said. - "You bear of child abuse . every . day," said police Sgt Donald St Stan-a brough, "but this is parent abuse.'' Prosecutor Steven Goldsmith said he might file attempted murder charges , against the teenagers and try them as . adults. The family was not identified. (Cmmtmmed from page 4) be satisfied by Clifford's use of this great word war. They are people who. live in a place -like New York, which, they assume, is reasonably high on a target list and therefore might be vulnerable during skirmishes. Others make the charge that Clifford on television was another old man calling for the young to die. And in doing so, he attracted attention, and this in turn would cause people immediately to look toward President Carter, who told Clifford to use the word war in the first place. These people, even would say that Carter, who spent three years speech ing and preaching, of peace, has turned to the word "war" at election time with such rapidity that it shows that the nan has no center, that all thought springs from electoral need. I don't believe that I think that we are merely witnessing Carter's coming' of age in Washington. When he first came around, in 1976, he was the calm outsider... His opponent. Ford, was the one who frantically got 41 marines killed in the Mayaguez incident off Cambodia. Carter was not the type to become trapped in such thoughtless exercises. Carter, elected, spent the next couple of years in prayer for peace, kissing cheeks for peace, hugging men at treaty signings for peace. And always, thanking and praising God for allowing the United States to get through all these months without one serviceman losing his life. ' It was one of the lousiest periods of American life that anyone can remember. It produced a malaise in the American people. Here they were, thrown into shopping centers and living rooms, trying to work out relation-snips, having the relationships contaminated by money problems, discovering that present pleasure lasts as long as a spark, and understanding that perhaps they are all going nowhere. A wife in the kitchen cooking for a man she knows she never should have married. Carter, a President in torpor, provided no distraction. And suddenly it was election time, the heart of a President's career, saving his job, and just as quickly. Carter had in front of him the greatest of all campaign aids: an international crisis. ; THE RUSSIANS. WHO had been mucking around in Afghanistan for 22 months, decided to go in openly, with tanks and troops in tracks. Things that you can see on television. They went into Afghanistan in about the way - Lyndon Johnson sent the marines to Santo Domingo when somebody claimed the new ruler was a Communist Except that Afghanistan could someday lead to the Arabian oil fields. Could. When Russia went into Czechoslovakia and Hungary they could have been going into the Atlantic Ocean. But Eisenhower wasnt up for reelection so he said nothing. Afghanistan is different The Could comes in an election year. In any other year you wouldn't dare say that Afghanistan was the greatest threat to peace since 1945. But this year. Carter, immersed in traditional Washington politics, played it the old way. He drew a line in the sand and had Clark Clifford say that if the Russians came into the Persian Gulf, there would be war. And right away, the whole country felt better, The old ways are the best ways. We would fight for the oil wells. That the oil wells would be destroyed in the fighting, and the fighting then would be over sand, was unimportant That the fight could lead to a nuclear war and there would be nobody left to use the oil was not discussed. What mattered was the use of the word war. It's a lovely word, because everybody loves it particularly in a presidential campaign. Beautiful.

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