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The Boston Globe from Boston, Massachusetts • 21

Publication:
The Boston Globei
Location:
Boston, Massachusetts
Issue Date:
Page:
21
Extracted Article Text (OCR)

2t THE BOSTON GLOBE-TUESDXY, KPRITJ IT, 1931 CROSS-WORD PUZZLE SWAMPSGOIT BLAZE ROUTS 25 GH1LDREH Fire in School Eoof Laid to Locomotive Sparks REAL MYSTERY STORY HAS FILMLAND EXCITED Town of a Million Plots Confronted by Raffles Problem That Distracts the Sleuths 18-Throw. 19 Range. 22 Serpent 23 Color. 26 Greek. 28-Car drawn by an automobile.

30 Exalted happiness, 1,1 31 Vegetable. 3 Measure of weight. 33 Pertaining to recurrent ebb and flow. i 35 Numerical prefix. 37 The aun.

39 Lair. 1 43 Final emancipation of the soul of, Buddhism. 44 Italian woman title. 45 Consumed. 47-Gowns.

49 Card gam. rJ 51 Undermine. 53 Rootstock, Pacific food staple, 55 Ridge. 57 Stick in the mud. 59 Enmeshes.

61 Ejects. 62Dog. 63 Sound of a bell. 65 Ocean. 67 Number.

69 European language (abbr), 71 Senior (abbr). (Solution tomorrow) 1 ACROSS 1 Treeless plain. 7 Deer meat. 13 Concerning. 14 Insect.

16 Ancient port of Rom. 17 Single thing. 18 Pains. 20 French chalk 21 Convent dwellcff 22 Engage. 24 Turn to right.

25 Thallium (symbol). 26 Portuguese part of India. 97 A tun 29-Deciliter (abbr). 30 Daring villain. 30 Unconcealed.

34 Dominate. 36 Follow as a consequence. 38 Assistant. 40 Fastidious. 41 Electrified particle.

42 Extended laterally. 43 Unless (legal). 44 Soft, sweet (music). 46 Go ashore. 48 Exhibition of works of at.

50 Stand for a picture. 52 Right (abbr). 54-i-Negative prefix. 56 Sailor. 57 Compass point.

58 Large Inclosed vehicle. 60 A dance. 63 Liquid measures (abbr). 64 God of war. 66 With fu.l force.

67 Social affair. 68 Famous. 70 Vex. 71Slight valley. 72 Onset.

73 List. DOWN 1Stroll. 2 Cancel. 3 Strain. 4 Emmet.

5Part of the Bible (abbr). 6 Adjoin. 7 Interdiction. 8 Refusal. 9 Suffix denoting "one who does.

10 Male deer. 11 Lubricated. 12 Balloon basket. 15 Blunders. SOLUTION OF YESTERDAYS i CROSS-WORD PUZZLE I SWAMPSCOTT, April 14 A fire on the roof of the Neighborhood Club on Humphrey st this morning caused 25 children, between 5 and 6 years of age, to be led from their kindergarten class and resulted In damage of about 4200 to the' roof of the building.

The children were lined up by Miss Grace Swett, Instructor, of Beverly, and, after filing to the coat room for their coats, filed out of the building. The school Is in the Beach Bluff Section, and the children are from wealthy North Shore families. The fire was discovered by Miss Swett. Realizing the danger If the children became excited, she exercised particular care, and prevented any disturbance. Within a few moments all the children were out of the building and watched the fire-fighters put out the blaze.

It is thought the fire started from the sparks of a passing locomotive. QUINCY WOMEN VISIT FIRST NATIONAL PLANT A party of Quincy, Atlantic and Wollaston Club women visited the plant ef the First National Stores, Inc, at Somerville this afternoon nd were shown through the plant fly Bernard F. McGoldrick of Quincy, vice president of First National, in charge of the meat division. In the party were Mrs John A- Peterson. president, and Mrs William Og-rean, Dorcas Society, Quincy Methodist Church: Mrs Eliot C.

Moody, president, and Mrs Hastings Moles, St Chrysostom's Church Guild, Wollaston; Mrs Charles E. Packard, past president, and Mrs William Cummings, vice president. Womens Union, Atlantic Memorial Church: Mrs Mae F. Berry, president. and Mrs Florence Dillon.

American Legion Auxiliary, Quincy Post 95; Mrs A. M. Whittum, president, and Mrs George Edgerton. Dorcas Society, Atlantic Methodist Church; Mrs Leo F. Hollins, president, and Mrs R.

T. Penelope Club, Wollaston: Mrs Edward L. Ellgner. president, and Mrs Earle L. Wheeler, Wollaston Mothers Club; Mrs Edward T.

De-Eruvn. chairman social welfare, and Mrs" Frank S. Williamson, Wollaston Womans Club; Mrs Harold Keith, president, and Mrs John S. Leake, Wollaston M. E.

Ladies' Aid Society. AMUSEMENTS COPLEY THEATRE Monkey Flay by Sam Janney. First time on any stage. The cast: Robert Kenmore. Jack Storey Dr Howard Hollins.

Donald Thompson Braoker Janie 8. Jenmeon Greta Kentrtore Brooke Joe Banning. Heniierion Murkn Harry A Husrenot MeSweeney Mark Kent Onai Barbara Haune Betty fvna Davm Stole Doufla Mclean Howard Pt.vrnian David Baker Dr Niehol William Jeffrey Monkey Henderson, Richard Whorf Medical Hxaminer Jpeel EfteUe Fenlav Eunice Brownine If you like your police inspectors grim and your policemen mere supernumeraries; if you insist that your mystery-solvers shall be deadly earnest, and the rest of the cast pretty fairly noble, Monkey is no play for you. It is by the author of Loose Ankles, so you know beforehand that it isnt going to be dull. Monkey is the nickname of an eccentric police detective, eccentric to the point of having the hobby of saving money for the taxpayers, and kidding the whole detective business right in the presence of, the upturned boot-soles of the murdered man.

It must be said also that by the grace of the author he follows a logical course straight through his puzzle, and convicts his man with a quaint sequel and a snappy tag that 'make "Monkey stand out in strong contrast to plays of this sort. The curtain rises Just as Robert Ken-more, rich banker with a mean disposition, Is arranging with his physician that the doctor shall marry his stepdaughter, and between them they shall have all his money. The stepdaughter, played with fine intensity by Miss Alison Brooke, has fallen in love with a hoofer and thats just the trouble. Stepfather wont have it, and the plot proceeds from there. Theres a neat bit of side-plot with some minor villains, but actually the whole play revolves round the antics of Monkey Henderson and the wonderfully well chosen and beautifully expressed cracks of an Irish policeman.

McSweeney, arriving after the murder, doesnt act a bit like the policeman that reporters meet on murder cases. But then, neither does any member of the cast; thats what makes the play unusual and intriguing. The mystery Isnt so much; most of the audience appeared last night to have solved it before the smoke had blown away. The chief suspect was shown madly fumbling through the drawers of a desk, desperate to kill the man who was making 4iis sweetheart scream with pain and terror; the curtain descended in the midst of the scrabbling, and the sound of five shots was heard. Then there was a after a considerable pause.

There were four possible suspects, and the second and third acts were spent in eliminating them, or rather in working through the inessential to the inescapable. Richard Whorf, in the title role, gave a marvelous performance and created an unforgettable character. He skipped about; he chattered and gibed, and sat on a limb. He did everything but hang oy his tail. And he gave a fine read-irg to some remarkably snappy lines, biggest laugh coming when he observed What between the seventh commandment and the 18th amendment, we re having a hell of a time.

Mark Kent as McSweeney, the harp with braEs buttons on him, was irresistible. He had the real flavor, and, in common with every one of the company, made a clean-cut character Finally, for a first-time performance, it was splendid. The only man not up in his cues was the lights man. TREMONT THEATRE Magician Thurston May we assure the woman who sat in row and lamented through the performance, I really cant understand how it is done that she was not alone' in her difficulties. For the celebrated master of magic carries with him a collection of Illusions that probably would prove baffling to some of the Hindu Jugglers from whom he professes to borrow some of them.

Mr Thurston is more than a sleight-of-hand performer; more, even, than a magician of the first order. He is an exceedingly fine entertainer. By virtue of his ability to create funny situations (both with malice aforethought and on the spur of the mo-rnentj he manages to keep his audience, in spasms of laughter through a large part of the evening. One comes away from the Tremont Theatre with a bewildering impression of broken eggs, ladies' sawed in halves and stuck together again, quacking ducks appearing most inopportunely from the garments of gentlemen in the audience, terribly em'oarrassed gTownups and wholly unembarrassed youngsters on the stage itself, beautiful girls floating around In midair or being shot out of cannon or having swords stuck through them, and finally a lot of uproarious laughter over heaven only knows just what. Mr Thurston is very ably assisted by his daughter Jane, who, for the last three years has been appearing with her distinguished sire, and already has attained eminence herself as a dealer in the magic arts.

The lady is exceedingly easy to look upon. This asset, combined with an ability to dish up with the proper flourish and snap a great variety of the stock tricks and some of the newer ones, lends a pleasing variety to the long production. Perhaps Miss Thurstons most novel trick is that of shooting a live canary bird into a lighted electric bulb. To attempt to give mention to a.l the Illusions presented by Howard Thurston himself is out of question, for they run into the dozens to which Jane adds 14 or 15 of her own. Most Impressive, though far from new, is the famous levitation trick, by which the form of a woman is made to float ftom a couch on which she reclines, high into the air.

Wires? Well, how about the hoop that Thurston passes around the suspended form? Then there is the sequel levitation combined with disannearance. The supposed form of the woman, covered with a scarf and floating over the heads of the orchestra and actually down into the audience, turns out to be nothing but impalpable air. Where did Bhe go? Ah, thats Just It. Where did she? The woman who is sawed In halves, while a mob from the audience stands on the Stage and looks on, is as old as magic, but always brings one of the biggest bursts of applause. And the Iasia mystery, the disappearance of a woman from an iron cage, suspended high above the stage, Is still another wonder.

But, in the minds of the great army of children who doubtless will see Thurston in the course of this engagement (and the army started marching in on him last night, and had a gorgeous time) will stand out above all else the moments when eggs hold the center of the stage. Egg3 by the dozen, eggs piling up, eggs crashing, eggs appearing from' mouths, from hats, eggs even being tossed, nonchalantly into the orchestra pit, with all the while the audience screaming with laughter. When mirth and magic mix, its great stuff. UNLIMITED PARKING DOWNTOWN AFTER 6 P. Metropolitan! LAST TWO DAYS Even the Hard-boiled Critic Go Wild Over i I Paramount Mcsmterpiee of Entertainment with JACKIE COOPER ROBERT COOGAN M1TZI GREEN JACKIE SEARL EatertaliOMt for tk Faolly PLYMOUTH THEATRE The Patch Comedy by Patrick Kearney.

Presented by Robert V. Newman. Staged by John D. Williams. First lime on any 6tage.

The cast: Dudley Wpafherbee Robert W. Crozler Elmore Muriree. Conklin Margaret Muriree. Gertrude Fowler Hopkins M. Trouerhton Mike Donovan Roy Roberts Charles Murtree Henry Neill Henry William Morris Patrick Murphy Arthur Sinclair Widow Donovan Maire Neill Larry Heffernan.

OSullivan Mr Weatherbee. Marie Burke Billed as a new American comedy, The Patch is often more of a farcical burlesque than anything else In exploiting what the author proclaims as new material in the theatre realistic representation of the Irish in America. The Irish residing in America who deny their birthright are lambasted to a frazzle and the Irish who boast of their ancestry are lauded to the skies, but ail in such an extravagant and boisterous way as to rob the play of all suggestion of serious characterization If the author ever intended that there should be any such suggestion. If the author merely sought to win laughter he no doubt had reason to be gratified with the reception accorded his play by last evenings audience. There was real if broad humor in some of the lines and there were explosions of laughter for such declara' tions as Who in Gods name ever could control the Irish and Can you picture a man who shook hands with Parnell wearing pajamas! But there was a lot more dialogue that was tiresome chatter and there was not much in the sentimental prattle that was convincing.

Structurally, The Patch Is on a par with Abies Irlsh Rose, yet one would hesitate to predict that It will make a like popular appeal. But, as the best of all Irish playwrights has said: You never can tell." The time of the play is the present and the scene is laid in a town of the Middle West, alternately in the fashionable section oi the town and in The Patch, the Irish settlement across the railroad tracks. Was this patch anything Jike "The Cabbage Patch that brought first fame to William Hodge? Mr and Mrs Charles Murfee have risen to wealth and social recognition, and all because, as Mrs Murfee insists, they had changed the spelling of their ancestral name Murphy. The daughter, Elinore, is engaged to the most aristocratic young man in town. Mr Murfee is a candidate for Mayor andf Mrs Murfee has visions of herself as the fist lady of the land.

She has one harrowing fear. Her husband's old fa'ber, Pat Murphy, has been promising to come from Ireland and make -them a visit. Oi course, he does come, and with his arrival begins the farce and he shattering of the ladys ambitious dreams of social exaltation. He is a jovial old soul, who revels In the fact that he Is an Irishman of the old sod, makes bombastic political speeches and Insists upon wearing his hat and smoking his pipe In the parlor. Mr, Murfee's campaign manager rather welcomes the old mans appearance he Is likely to insure support of the Irish vote needed in the coming election.

Pat does gather in the doubtful votes, but when his daughter-in-law turns him out of her house he threatens to give the votes to a rival candidate. When the daughter, Elinore, meets Mike Donovan, a young man from The Patch who has been engaged to advertise Mr Murfees candidacy foT Mayor, she falls in love with him at once and the aristocratic youth is immediately in the discard. Mikes mother, a true daughter of the old sod, is brought into the picture and ably supports Pat in the hilarious ructions that continue until the curtain falls at a late hour. Arthur Sinclair, remembered for his clever work with the Irish Players from Dublin, gives a hearty and broadly amusing portrayal of the joyous natured old Irishman, and Maire ONeill, also remembered from the same Dublin players, is no less amusing as the rabidly patriotic but good-hearted old Irish woman. The other roles are adequately portrayed.

PLAYS CURRENT AND OTHERS SOON TO COME COLONIAL THEATRE Cherries Are Ripe, amusing little comedy adapted from the Hungarian which affords excellent opportunities to Vilma Banky and Rod LaRocque, noted players of the screen who are now appearing in life on the stage. The second week. SHUBEBT THEATRE Simple Simon lavishly staged musical comedy, gorgeously dressed and decorated with much feminine beauty. Ed Wynn Is the dominating and always amusing centre of interest. The dancing by Harriet Hoctor is fascinatingly deft and graceful.

The second week. WILBUR THEATRE On the Spot, semi-satirical, but wholly Interesting melodrama concerning the personalities and amazing activities of Chicago gangsters. It was written by the English novelist, Edgar Wallace, and is one of the best of the many plays of its type. Wilbur Crane and Anna May Wong are the leading players. The second week.

on the question and those in favor of the Everett School site won, 515 to 409. On Article 2, proposing the so-called Willett Lot, action was indefinitely postponed at the request of Mr Willett. At this time hundreds of citizen began to leave the hall, believing that the question was settled. When Article 3 came up, Francis Foley of the Finance Committee offered an amendment to this article that tho preference of the citizens of this town was for the Washington-st site near the Municipal Building, A motion to Indefinitely postpone was made, but Moderator Halloran ruled this out of order and put Mr Foleys amendment, which was carried 339 to 330. Now the Selectmen have two sites to offer the Government for a Postoffice and the wires will again be hot until the matter is finally setled.

Bids must be submitted before FYiday TO PROBE ALLEGED -RANSACKING OF HOUSE Cambridge Chief Acts on Johnsons Complaint An Investigation of the alleged rife-sacking on April 2 of a Cambridge residence by the Cambridge liquor squad while the owner was away will be made by Chief John J. McBride. Oscar Johnson, whose home Hazel st, Cambridge, was raided, has engaged counsel. Johnson returned home from New York April 4, and, finding his home on the second floor of the Hazel-st address ransacked, reported the matter to the police of the North Cambridge Station. Police of that station investigated, learned that the place had been raided by the liquor Bquad, and sent that report to Police Headquarters.

Chief McBride said that he learned of the case only this morning, and will question members of the liquor squad a to the alleged ransacking of the house. mnvAY monv HassT- 5S-ave' ONLY THREE DAYS MORE TO SEE HOLLYWOOD By MOLLIS Special Dispatch to the Globe and the North American Newspaper Alliance. HOLLYWOOD, Calif, April 14-Wlth mystery stories going well In the studios, the town of million plots Is confronted by a Raffles problem which has the sheriff and his 6reuths almost distracted. Filmland Is excited. A Raffles working In the big hotel of the village has managed to sneak out such things as a mink coat with handsome diamond brooch attached, 510.000 diamond ring, and a few other nlcknacks of the sort, right under the house detectiyes nose.

The peculations go right on apparently the work being done with a pass key and the management thinks one moment its a man another a woman. Some Costumes! Hugh Herbert, watching the ponies run at Callente, wore this subdued little Spring costume, a gray flannel suit with yellow stripe, yellow shirt, yellow, black and white tie, green hat and brown buckskin shoes. But Geoffrey Kerr didnt intend that Herbert should have all the color honors, and appeared in a tan and brown checked cheviot coat, bright reddish tan knickers, emerald gTeen slip-on and hose, pale green shirt, green and white tie, brown shoes and cap. Theres nothing sober and subdued about a Hollywood Spring! Hard Show to Cast Casting for Queer People, the Hollywood epic which is causing many people anxious nights, begins in earnest with Leo McCarey as director. This is one of the first pictures made since the old Lasky days which will be shot entirely within a radius of a AMUSEMENTS 7 AYcq.

host ACTS VACII'IOW THEATRES TODAY MALDEN Cont .) mm CONSTANCE BENNETT ROBERT MONTGOMERY IN THE EASIEST WAY BUSTER KEATON in farlgr, BrHrrwn tn BaTh Mallm 5771 MATTAPAN SQUARE FitHarle Mareli. Claiatta Cel-tart. Charlet Bala HONOR AMONG LOVERS l2J And NEIL HAMILTON MIL. 1200 COMMAND PERFORMANCE NEEDHAM nvssezst RANGO Alie LOWELL SHEIMAH ROYAL BED NEWTON Mat. 2:15 No Ev.

Shew BUSTER. KEATON inj sw-wwas Dvdlan hkm vii farlor. Belrora an Bath J'VVr LOIS MORAN In ttSjc-wtfaAeo "umder suspicion REVERE Wlnnla LIMnr, Jo E. Brw In SIT TIGHT CONRAD NASEL In FREE LOVE FBI. MIGHT VAUDEVILLE AHt SOUTH BOSTON HTC9WW T0 PAY WitN RONALD CfllMAM.

All 'TRAIkSLDFENTHVEST SOUTH END LADIES' LINEN NIGHT DOROTHY PETERSON Mothar Cry, 1 Clrli Oewan Exeitraant SOMERVILLE ED WYNN in I FOLLOW THE LEADER STAR CAST In 'THE MATE SHIP no, rvl-rwt CONSTANCE BtNNEII in CAPITOL THE EASIEST WAY, CAPTAIN APPLEJACK1! BROADWAY SeaMTMt 2700 The MaoWho Came Back, with Janrt Gay nor, Chat. Farrell Alao THE COMMAND PERFORMANCE WATERTOWN C. GEORGE BANCROFT In. SCANDAL SHEET ff F0RRF3T STANLEY in THE LOVE KISS I tof-dQ borne COMING FRI. MO LIMIT IN PERSON MERRICK t-, i quarter of a mile of Hollywood boulevard, with, of course, interior scenes on the Hughes lot.

The story Is called A Backstage Glimpse of Some Hollywood Phases, and the director admits Its the toughest casting Job hes ever been given. Like most stories of its type, the characters are composite In the main not being direct caricatures of any one person. It will be an initial venture in ironical farce for the screen. Turning Back the Clock When all the present plans for revivals are complete, you can walk down the street, walk into a cinema and in no time turn back the clock years. Mae Marsh will be playing in Over the Hill lured back to cinema ways by Winfield Sheehan, after a round dozen years of retirement in Flintridge with her three children, the oldest of whom is 11.

Pola Negri will be once again enchanting the world as she did of yore. That is, if Pola clicks when the new methods are applied. Pola was purely an artist of silent films, and there are microphone quirks to overcome and accents to be dealt with. Also one will be able to attend the Mata Harl story on almost any corner, because it is the theme chosen for La Negri the theme (camouflaged) in Dishonored with Marlene Dietrich, and the theme of one of Greta Garbos forthcoming releases. As of Tore' Back in the colony will be shortly the two Princess as of yore, still not speaking since Mae Murray married her prince.

Pola once had Maes particular Mdivanl as cavalier servente. The pale Pola with her scarlet lips and passionate dark eyes accepted a Georgian Prince at that time for what a Georgian Prince was worth in her estimation. Her estimation seemed to rate a title in this country as anyone who owned a herd of a dozen goats or so." Along came another and more allurng suitor. Perhaps Valentino, and Pola let Prince Mdivani slip through her fingers, like nothing at all. Then Mae Murray became the Princess Mdivani, and Pola found to her concern that the press took the Mdlvanis of Georgia quite seriously, and that Mae Murray was a Princess indeed nad got great big black headlines about it.

Pola heard that there was another Mdivani at large, with a title also. Another little Princeling who wouldnt be above the flattering attentions of a beautiful and famous moving picture actress. So Pola up and married the brother of Maes Prince just like that! And there were two Princess Mdlvanis in Hollywood, the supremacy lying with the elder of the two. Pola said her husband was the elder Mae said hers was. The two ladies ceased speaking to each other.

Now Mary McCormick will become the second Princess Mdivani if the present schedule is adhered to. Pola may once more bow to Mae the titular differences being all straightened out, and Mary being challenger in the championship Mdivani honors. Kens Exercise Ken Maynard is bound that Hollywood income will not rob him of his reputation for physical fitness. So, although he has a couple of quarts of airplanes, 30 horses and two speedboats, Ken may be seen running five miles each day so the waistline will keep its place. The company has been working in Place rita Canon making a picture of the West, where men are men and pansies are flowers.

We were bowling along its shady roads when we spied he Maynard car rounding the curve leisurely with chauffeur comfortably enBconsed behinc the wheel, taking In the scenery with a lazy eye and the Industrious Ken loping along in the limousine wake doing his five miles. Look at that fellow has an airplane, 30 horses and a couple of boats, and runs five miles a day! said I could run five miles a day, too, if I had all that money to come home to, said the village cynic. NORWOOD VOTERS SELECT TWO SITES Three Locations Proposed for New Postoffice NORWOOD, April 14-Having se lected two sites for the new Govern ment Postoffice, after two and one-half hours of debate, the citizens are now wondering which one the Government officials will accept. At a special town meeting in the Junior High School Hall last night, attended by nearly 1300 citizens, the largest meet ing In this town for years, three sites were suggested to the voters for them to make a choice. Moderator James Halloran called the gathering to order and submitted Article 1, providing for givinig the Selectmen power to submit for sale the Everett School lot containing 29,200 square feet of land, at a price not less than 75 cents a foot.

Joseph McManus, a former postmaster, at once took the floor and made a long argument to the voters explaining to them the advantages of this lot. He said that the lot was near the railroad station and the large industries. Charles E. Houghton of the Planning Board then submitted the Planning Boards report, which favored the site within the town square. Charles Britton spoke in favor of the site near the industrial center.

Frank A. Morrill gave a resume of Norwoods growth and said 40 percent of the income of the Postoffice business came from industrial houses and 75 percent cf the business was dene south of the Everett School site. He stated that the so-called Washlngton-st site had only a 78-foot frontage. Herbert Plympton, a well-known manufactcrer, opposed the Washmg-ton-st lot, as he said a building there would spoil the looks of the new Municipal Building. Francis Foley then took the floor and said that the Everett School site should be reserved for the growth of the Norwood Hospital, which Is adjacent to the 6ite Walter p.

Tilton, who presented the carillons In the Municipal Building to the town, took the floor in favor of the site adjacent to the Municipal Building. Former Selectman Thomas B. Mulvehlll supported Mr Foleys views. Attorney Joseph Riley spoke in favoT of the Everett School site and said that If the hoKpital desired to expand there was plenty of room on the Lln-den-Bt side and that plans were now made for expansion In that direction. Mrs Florence LeFevre opposed the Everett School site.

After all the debating ended Moderator Halloian called for a rising vote MARLENE DIETRICH dishonored' Paramount Spy Drama With VICTOR McLAGLEN 7:35, 9:53 m. Also Burlesque flj Carmen with Charles Chaplin. FaH urday, The Lightning Flyer and Riders of the North. BOWDOIN SQUARE Cimarron, 4 thrilling etory of the development ofi Oklahoma with Richard Dix; 10 :2 a 12:45, 3:02, 5:19, 7:35, 9:53 Also The Flood with Eleanor Board man and Monte Blue. GAIETY Sunny," a musical filnt with Marilyn Miller, and What Widow, a comedy of love in Paris, with Gloria Swanson.

Vaudeville, Thursday, Moby Dick with Johi Barrymore and Reno with Rutl Roland and Montagu Love. LANCASTER "Raffles' with Ronald Colman and Kay Francis and Theli' Own Desire with Norma Shearer andl Robert Montgomery; Wednesday; through Friday, My Past with Beti Lyon and Bebe Daniels, and Follow1 the Leader with Ed Wynn and Glnge' Rogers. AMUSEMENTS Everyone wants tn this thats why we're holding It 2nd WEEK SPINE CHILLING YET FASCINATING I OOI.F with Johtin Farrell ChiMren Ail Mioi 25c in Sir BARBARA STANWYCK 'Ten Cenl A Dance HEADING RM VAUDEVILLE end PAT ROONEY 3rd 8cwn bw I.O' Tenin- ULALI ELNLYC In 'SISSOiAYIRi LADIES Coot. 9 11 t. Cklllrto 25 Ha tad 2720 Hat.

ill rh-im ROSETTA DUNCA.1 of tlM Duncan Slstan NEWiGAYE i DIG VAUDEVILLE ACTS 5 2 TALKING FEATURES 2 MARILYN MILLER m-SUNNY jLORIA swansoTwhat A widow LANCASTER "REVIEW DAY" "RAFFLES" Ronald Colman Kay Francis "THEIR OWN DESIRE" Norma Shearer Robert Montgomery BOSTON THEATRES AND HITS Uncrpimtln Maura. La A I. I. SKrVart PLYMOUTHFIrst Mil. Tfcnr.

Robert Newotan TitiwnU Arthor Hloelair aixt Merle 0 eUl III caSS EPATT CD TIHRS. a WIT. MAT. flV Wilbur Mat. Wad.

SGo to SI.S3 THK SKA RONS COMrilY HIT sum WiU CIANE WtlSUK MAY WOKG gwnoa romi SHUBERT Mat. Lest Week Mat. Wed. SO to $2.59 ED VYrifl The IVi-fr-I rrwr Vrrmni Ilimeelf la ZIECFELDS "SIMPLE SIMON Harriet Hrwriw war with realistic view of warfare as seen by the Germans, with an all-German cast; 1:25, 3:25, 5:25, 7:25, 9:25 m. REPERTORY Hells Angels, a spectacular aviation etory with Ben Lyon, Jean Harlow and James Hall.

Also Holiday, the sophisticated story of a millionaires daughter who wanted love and not money, with Ann Harding. Wednesday, The Devil to Pay with Ronald Colman and Loretta Young, also "Africa Speaks. MODERN AND BEACON Woman Hungry. which tells the adventures of a Boston girl in the great open spaces, with Lila Lee and Sidney Blackmer; 10:19 a 12:30, 2:49, 5:04, 7:19, 9:34 m. Just For a Song" with an all-star cast; 9:10, 11:34 a 1:49, 4:04, 6:19, 8:34, 8:34 m.

Saturday, Three Girls Lost with Loretta Young and John Wayne and Trapped with Nick Stuart. PARK The Middle Watch." an English nautical comedy with Jacqueline Logan; 10:28 a 12:45, 3:02, 5:19, AMUSEMENTS 'IjyLTO mi. MASS.AVB. NORMA SHEARER In STRANGERS MAY KISS With ROBERT MONTGOMERY Semnlnt VnVHi WM. HAINES In "A TAILOR-MADE MAN 'ASH.

ST OmcC HAMILTON PlACi CHA8. CHAPLIN CHAS. WITHERS CO. FRANCIS RENAULT uTrh- HILTON A (AROH MAXINE LEWIS Othin ntm MEN LOVE WITH ADOLPH MENJOU LEILA HYAMS l0EWS BEATEN VAUDEVILLE COLOrilAL 1.50 MAT. TOM'W LAST 2 WEEKS viAKrH SELWYN rre-nt.

DANKY-LA ROCQUE IN PERSON IN THE NEW COMEDY CHERRIES ARE RIPE Sell-Out Prices: Evee. 80o to $2.60 MATS. TnPMflFJT TONIGHT, 8:20 I IfGUIUN I 91 MAT. TOMW THE WONDER SHOW -Tawous Magician Am NiS DfHfSHTtR cVC, imam owccwavk-NIGHTS A SAT. 60o to $1.60 WEDNESDAY B0c.

7Bc, $1.00 lofufo AKiicoaid Bu lir.itU in person wih "MIRTH PARADE" Mutual Burlesque VAUMVtlU fc PICTURES -AIWAY5 SiWH.fiG IxrniG 1 mi MI0NIGHT SHOW EVERY FRIDAY AT IH30 Next Week PRIMO CARNERA In Perton. Commflncinq Sunday Midniaht April lS. Era. 820. Tkin.

2.20 Ken. 120044 Ben Seat First Time On Any Stage MPfFHfCtfJJ an unusual i.lUtitiCl DETECTIVE COMEDY 1 Cl 11 f. M. Mitr. so.

Era. Gripping German Talkie COMRADES OF 1918 REPERTORY THEATRE New Policy New Prices HFI.I.S ANf.FI ANN IIAKDIM) In "HOMTY 85o Till F. M. Aftrr 7 IMAkkON NICHAID BIX TNI FLOOD "Eltaner eariaif Sant lle Cra. Tkm.

"THE reODIGAL "MV FAST MilaiiM rirtmnm Ar. 13. I fine Hells Angels. the spectacular air drama In which Ben Lyon, James Hall and Jean Harlow take the leading roles. Wednesday the pictures shown will be The Devil to Pay with Ronald Colman and Africa Speaks.

Variety at Scollay Square A Trip to Holland, which has for performers a musical a double-voiced yodelier named Frank Duke, Bobby London, a young acrobatic dancer, a pair of tap dancers, and a Boprano, is the featured act of the variety bill at the Scollay Square Theatre this week. Other of the numeruos act are Hickey Brothers, comedians and dancers; Freddie Pisano Co in Traffic Lights; The Scollayettes, in dance routines; The Pickfords and O'Day, acrobats; and Mary Marlowe, in song impressions. MOVIE PLAYS NOV ON VIEW AT THE THEATRES STATE Strangers May Kiss, which tells the dramatio tale of a woman who threw her cap over the windmill and tried to prove that wofn-en may adventure in love as W'ell as men, with Norma Shearer and Neil Hamilton; 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50 Friday, A Tailor Made Man with William Haines. ORPHEU3I City Lights, a silent comedy of a wistful clown who loves a blind flower girl but who gets into all kinds of mischief with an eccentric millionaire friend, with Charlie Chaplin and Virginia Cherrill; 9:15 a 2:15, 3:30, 6:30, 9:45 m. Vaudeville headed by Charles Withers.

Friday, Men Call It Love with Adolphe Menjou. METROPOLITAN Skippy, an amusing story of children and their sorrows and JoyB, with Jackie Cooper, Robert Coogan and Mitzi Green; 11:25 a 1:45, 4:05, 5:30, 7:50 m- City Streets with Gary Cooper and Sylvia Sidney. OLYMPIA, UPTOWN and FENWAY Dishonered, the story of a beautiful and clever Austrian Bpy, who held love more Important than honor, with Marlene Dietrich and Gary Cooper; at Olympia, 9:15. 11:20 a 1:25, 3:35, 5:30, 7:35, at Uptown, 1:00, 3:12, 5:20. 7:28, 9:36 m.

At Fenway, 1, 3:07, 5:17. 7:27, 9:37 m. Friday, The Finger Points with Richard Barthelmess. ItKO-KEITHS Dracula, a mysterious story of a human vampire who Is foiled only after exciting and thrilling mishaps, with Bela Lugosi and Helen Chandler; 9:35, 11:32 a 1:36, 3:40, 5:44, 7:48, 9:54 m. Friday, Ten Cents a Dance with Barbara Stanwyck.

KKO-ftOSTOX Misbehaving Ladies, or how a princess is mistaken for a dressmaker when she makes a visit to her home town, with Lila Lee and Louise Fazenda; 9:49 a 12:53, 4:01, 7p5, 10:13 m. Vaudeville headed by Pat Rooney. Saturday, Beyond Victory with Jack Holt. SCOLLAY SQUARE Ten Nights In a Barroom, the old prohibition classic brought more up-to-date, with William Farnum and Tom Santschl, 11:34 a 2:32, 6:45, 4:43 m. Vaudeville.

Sunday. A Connecticut Yankee with Will Rogers. FINE ARTS Comrade of 1918. a powerful and effective treatise against AMUSEMENTS SYMPHONY HALL-TONIGHT AT 8:15 MAXIM ESAIMIUIES Ann Corio at Old Howard Ann Corio, one of the best-known and most greatly liked girls in burlesque, is appearing with the Mirth Parade company at the Old Howard this wreek. She wins applause both by her singing and her engaging personality.

Prominent in the Mirth Parade are Nora Ford, capable specialty dancer; Patricia Kelly, a winsome yet lively soubrette; and Johnny Rags Ragland and Charles Bimbo Davis, two genuinely hot comedians, others in the cast are Gertie Reed, Mervin Harmon, and Ray Parsons. Tho charming chorus offers clever fantastic dances. The vaudeville program includes Archie and Gertie Falls, aerialists, and Lauren and Ladare, in music and comedy. The pictures feature George OBrien in Salute, and Aileen Pringle and Grant Withers In Soldiers and Women." Friday night there will be a special Ann Corio Midnight Show. Next week, beginning with a midnight performance Sunday, April 19, the noted prize fighter, Primo Camera, will be seen in person.

Repertory Theatre Under the new policy of the Re per. tory Theatre the program will be changed Wednesdays and Saturdays. The present program consists of Holiday with Ann Harding, a sophisticated comedy of society life, and PREMIERS SIStER BRIDE TODAY Weds Canadian Minister to United States OTTAWA, April 14 (A. Mildred Mariann Bennett, sister of Premier R. B.

Bennett, becomes the bride this afternoon of Maj William Duncan Herrldge, recently appointed Canadian Minister to Washington. The Governor General and Countess Bessborough are among the invited guests fpr the ceremony to be performed in Chalmers United Church and for a reception to the bridal couple given by the Premier. For several years Miss Bennett has been hostess for her brother. Maj Herridge Is a close friend of Mr Bennett. SELECTMEN AT PEMBROKE INCREASE HERRING FEE PEMBROKE, April 14 The herring have started to run In the brook here.

The towns regular fee of 25 cents per 100 herring, has been increased by the Selectmen owing to the cost of maintaining the runway, and the charge will be 51 per 100 fish. LAWRENCE MAN KILLED WHEN TORCH EXPLODES LAWRENCE, April 14 EirrtI Gingras, 31, of 177 Water st was almost Instantly killed this morning, about 10 oclock, when the gasoline torch he was employing exploded and struck him on the head. GIngras wa employed at the Gut-terson Gould Junk yards, on Medford st, and wa breaking up old machinery with the aid of the torch when it exploded. Hq was rushed to the Lawrence General Hospital In the. ambulance, but wa pronounced dead on Its arrival.

He was married and had four children. wash-sT- WOMAN HUNGRY Btackm gydaft juSTfoR Ml Star (Hta WHh WEAR ALLSTON CLAUDETTE FREDRIC COLBERT MARCH HONOR AMONG LOVERS" --I AnR DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS ASP 0225-0226 'REACHING FOR THE MOD AWPLE FREE PARKING ASP 0225-0226- DCA ARLINGTON KPiTUL Iterate A Grac Mr in NEW MOON edvund LOWE In WHOLE OW2H1ANJ "MSN OR CALL BRIGHTON UBLIX BEAU IDEAL FrNM Ltratt Vmn Bro an Salt KEA70M CkarlU CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC fxrtar anR Baih iTrVU SO.CLfl DETTE COLBERT UK10872 HQ no 3 AMONG LOVE AS BEBE DANIELS MY PAST hmve DORCHESTER CONSTANCE BENNETT In THE EASIEST WAV iN ROBT MONTGOMERY THE CONQUERING HORDE RICHARD ARLEN TArWRAY I no Mf srf TONITE KA9ARET KISS ME AGAIN With BERNICE CLAIRE A UN CliiMler tf Hilly' T-yg Linen thgVt tJTHEATRE JUJUfU-SAKi VIENNESE NIGHTS Were Made for Love) with VIVIENNE SEGAL THE MIDNITE SPECIAL UH GUN Trvoa-Myraa Kmn-tfy CLAUDETTE COLBERT FREDRIC MARCH in Hcner Am on? Levers BUSTER KEATON In arlar, EtArtMt an SalN EG LEST ON SQUARE ONE HEAVENLY NIGHT jEVttVn LAVE JOM BOLES iJ'MAN FROM CHICAGO' 8arff.r0 Art Bbia A rcLrcYDMSa Bif Sua EbM Frl. Nnt- HYDE PARK Ft FT" PR Bonn I Calfaan laratt Va EVEllETI DEVIL TO PAY 1 I.TRAIV ahi) vrcTttniv SQUARE TODAY ARB VESTEROAV" SEE ITS IT'S UNUSUAL! MALDEN DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS In REACHING FOB THE MOON FATHERS SON CRA-OKaJ will, STONE. Slarti 0212 Eat, Ho-tar Arfi ln. 4.

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