The Boston Globe from Boston, Massachusetts on October 27, 1895 · 25
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The Boston Globe from Boston, Massachusetts · 25

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Sunday, October 27, 1895
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I 0 d II 0 0 e ci tt ci It I. ,s 1, 10 19 It it Lt It Lt IL pf ne I. ; !or' th) w ago s .. , , , . , , . , , ,,. THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBESIJNDAY, OCTOBER p 27 1895THIRTYSIX PAGES . , . . Yjeomptle- f TS...es.1:,..--"AniCS . , RETTY PICTURE FAME IN HUB STREETS. vvii!.oin,ndos sktnoreedweet banit Ihrrgyades?..uisr:ilotti lbe our et c etnh LI r uld be count- ed In a few minutes. And even a less familiar figure is that of his successor, Mr Samuel Little. Clil?' doel AO , , - P y di 27 , , Noted People Seen Every Day ItC"1"42111117 . 10 11 I 11 11 I John L. Gardner's name is very fa- c ts,t. .,. millar, but there is no doubt that less d in Boston. than a score of persons would pick hirrt I.. 1 1- o- PITIFI Trio Little Children Made Vona and Well by Dr. Greene's Norma. The Mother Also Restored to Health by That Grandest of All Medicines, Dr. Greene's Nervura ;. Blood and Nerve Remedy. . . .ik4 :try , , .11, , , . ,:d?f ,q4; , , ,,,,,,-,,,-,70, .1. , ",-;,, N., ' , '..,,,I,.'A'Itif'ie,,1.41.)....' k ". v. 11' '. I' , t'kil. It''''' 's '''., .4i ''',,'&t,s's'. -' ttiLli(. ' ' '' ' ''. 10'. ts, ,...c ,v t 4.'...'''''9191112DRit :- ' -:-'7";-'-' - I ''''-',4. ' ti !",'!)i 7 1 T ''''..: ' it 4 4 1. 4Sf, K 1 ''''' Ni1,,i. , .....7:6 . ' !lb ''''-., EC11011 ., , 'Attu') l'..1M;, - 1,,. ,.,.. ...... ;11) -,, ifialttqw, ,.,1: , r24ikatape..,..,.. , . ,,,,,. 7,41tiobiriii-... , ,, , ...... ',4'ali ,t1':,-,i4q$ miffs,.7,,$'," . .,,, ., ,--, .,;:: 40'7, ,- -',;.. ;.-.---,..;.,-;--7,.:-,,--f-j--,-F'' '. ' . ,,17!f,i-: , . t444 ';;Lvd,tri. ,..., ..X..11; 4Strc. .-:31---,7,,,,--,...,--:-.:',:,- A S , t- , lt, ., ,.,,' '4,",t..4 ' ;itit!'F.',e: -' :!,' It 4 ' if il0r....-1'. ',41-!.51 - - ''' t 'fS ',.$ '-'4' ' .. ' , . 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A ,V,:.---.17' - - '41rtk!, '.V.N , ,,..0 741, 4 1 f"..); , f ,, ,ii .. ,''...,f '., 1 -tv ,,,,- ,.,,, ,12,-,(, , :,..,,,,, '-, ,,,,-,--A. ) --- 1 r . ro,,,,,--,-,, ,-.), , 1 , , .4 -tz,,,41, , , : ,,. ,,,-,.. -k-k,-, , 1,1 ,, , ... '-: -,,s, - ', '-' , - - - . , 4k ;:,1 , :"-,' ,, 10, III , . ,,in, :!,.-...-' .,-- ';'111 1',:.1......'18.11)::, " ' 4 t ' f .1-7- ''''''' ,--,, .'- .. , ,,---,,'--'- ill ,..1,... ''',,,,, - i t of,:.-- ... ,,,, , , , 4'. fIllyt -;,--A1,, , ''. v 1 fl ,,,F;t. , ., 1 , ..' ,., , : ,,,,..,, 'Ali, 4. .', - t ' ''''''s ,,b,e...,- :, ii., ' 47ft.l.,,,....1,,.. ,---''' '' t 1 ..., .1 , I ; 1 di to Is to bl yid AIRS. 11. SILVER'S Strong. vigorouit and healthy children are what we all want, and how to keep our little ones in good health Is a question of the greatest interebt to us al). Children are peculiarly liable to nervous disorders; they become nervous, restless. fretful, cross and Irritable; their night's sleep is not calm and restful, but they toss restlessly from side to side. murmur or talk in their sleep and wake tired and unrefreshed in the morning. They bave an irregular appetite, grow thin and pale. look slight and puny, and their growth and development become stunted. If your children are sick, give that greatest of all children's remedies. Dr. Greene's Nervura, the great nerve and blood invigorant and health restorer. This wonderful remedy is above all a family medicine, and its name is a household word in thousands of homes all over the land. It is made from pure and harmless vegetable remedies, is calming, soothing and healing to the nerves. and at the same time strengthens and invigorates the entire system, restoring a healthful color to the cheek, refreshing sleep, strong nerves, stout limbs and that bounding health and vitality which All children should have. It is perfectly safe to give to children of any age, and its curative and restorative effects are wonderful. ' Mrs. H. Silver. of 142 Lewis St., New York City, was nt,t only restored berself to health by Dr. Oreene's Nervura blond and nerve remedy, but her two children, whose portraits ars here given, were made strong and well by this grand medicine. Airs. Silver says: "I was nervous for four years so that I could do nothing. I went to different doctors. but none could help me. I read so Mal in the papers about Dr. Greene's Nervura blood and nerve remedy that I thought I would try it. After the first bottle I felt relieved, so I used a couple of bottles more and now I am all right bottles more and now I am all right for the good it did me. 4'I also have two little girls who wet., sick, weak and run down, to whom I gave Dr. Greene's Nervura blood and nerve remedy. It did them so much good that I cannot be thankful enough. It made them well and M,f,KE RESCUES POPULAR. Chicago Girl Sets an Example for Boston MaidensRewarded Brave Man With a Kiss. CHICAGO, Oct 26--W. L. Lightheart of Freeport. III, rescued a pretty young woman from death, and got a kiss from ber for Ns heroism and presence of Mind. lie was crossing State st at Madison When the young woman slipped and fell In front of a cable train not more than 10 feet away. The Freeport man, who was walt,ng for the train to pass, grasped the Situation an.1 the frightened Young woman almost at the same instant, and. lifting her to hid shoulders, Jumped dear of the train, now almost Upon him. The girl could not rind words to express herself. so she just twisted her orm around Lightheart's reck and kissed him. Then she straightened her head gear and disappeared before any one in the crowd could learn her name. Horses Will Not Step on a Man. Every soldier knows that a horse will hot tread on a man intentionally. In the British cavalry there is a standing Order that if a trooper is unhorse(' he nun lie still. Even if the troop is riding rapidly In a charge the chances are that every horse that might tread on him will swerve aside to leave him unhurt. I AM WORKING GIRL. I Stand Ten 'lours a Day. ESPIC14L 10 tar. tApir B.A.... im---- ,,ur "I have silt g with bearing- . 'A;i r 1 v ,0 fered terribly , down pains, ! , '''' W-- , I giddiness, '' ' backache, and 1 wag ' kidnevtrouble. e ' 6d.- ti) Lydia E. P i n k l0 i '' , .0-7s:4v i t h a m Vegeta 1 ' ''' '' 4crliP '.91A C t ble Compound ' 11141''4' i has given me new lite. I recommend it to all." -- Nt A GGIE Lu K EN s, Thirteenth and Bute Streets, Nicetown, Ps. 0 1 ,417-,... ,ur v '',N, 1;,1 ' ti : I 111 1 i . :"444 .A1 10, ..,telt14t44 $4' ibiLioLl'''d'i' , 44 I I Butte Streets, Nicetowl 4 r- , c; PICTURE. LITTLE ONES. strong again, and they are now, thanks to this wonderful remedy, healthful and vigorous. Before I took Dr. Greene's Nervura blood and nerve remedy I could not eat or sleep. I could not do my housework. but now I am like a different woman. I give this testimonial that other sufferers may read it and know the good Nervura did me and my children." Use Dr. Greene's Nervura in all nervous diseases of infants and children, and see them improve in health and strength every day and hour. It is not a patent medicine, but the prescription of the most successful living specialist in curing nervous and chronic diseases, Dr. Greene, of 34 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. Ile has the largest practice in the world, and this grand medical discovery is the result of his vast experience. The great reputation of Dr. Greene is a guarantee that his medicine will cure, and the fact that he can be consulted by any one at any time free of charge, either personally or by letter, gives absolute assurance of the beneficial action of this wonderful medicine. VACATION FOR SCHOLARS. Harvard Street Primary School Closed , for Thorough Overhauling of the Sanitary Arrangements. Another school has been closed on account of. bad sanitation, and the breaking out of diphtheria among the pupils. This time it is the Harvard St primary school, connetted with the Washington grammar school of Brighton. In pursuance of instructions from the officers of the board of health the board's medical examiners for the various districts into which the city is 61- vided have been particularly careful in their investigations since the closing of the Vernon St primary school of Roxbury. Dr Elizabeth Keller, who is the examiner for the Brighton district and West Roxbury, found about 10 cases of diphtheria among the children of the Harvard st school. She immediately notified the board of healtn, which in turn sent word to thc school COMIlli t tee, recommending the Immediate closing of the buildiug and ttn? repairing of the drainage. Col Began,. superintendent of public buildings, took action at once, and when the children of that school appear at the gates Monday morning they will find them closed and a gang of workmen engaged in digging vp the yard. In this case th3 trouble is practically the same as that encountered at the Vernon st school. Back of the building I s an old-fashioned vault, which will be removed, and in its place a new system, which has worked very successfully in other schools, will be put in. This system includes a tank, automatically operated. by means of Athich the closets will be flushed, thus securing absolute frealcm from the stagnation that has been the cause of so much a ph theria. A new drain will have to be tail to the street, and as it will have to pa:s around the sehoolhouse to reach the sewer, about 125 feet of drain pipe will be required. Be...,,cdes this the water main by which tile tank will be filled will require about as many feet of pipe. The work on the Vernon st primary school is being rapidly pushed forward, and it is expected that the school will be ready for occupancy again a week from Monday The repairs will have cost In this instance about SSOO or $900. Winter Service to an Flancisco. On Monday, Nov 4, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific R It will inaugurat,, for the winter months their popular tourist car service between Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco via their Fort Worth route. Any information in reik-ard to this route or how to reach all ,Irts of the west can be had upon ap- plimtion to L. Loomis, New England Pass. Agent, 296 Wash. st, Boston. teldr4,,, 0,-- ,,,, .14,-- 1 --2' ' ,? ,,k - -.1i,.. , ' 1"- ,, ,,,,,,4,,,, 1 4,-, qra, , ''. K s ' 41tig A' I 0, ( , t : . :1.,;41 JL? :: 4. A:t-i-,,,. ,,- ; -,,.. r ,,,,,, 4 q k,t' ..---P461"-r-,. , .,-f ' " - - i,', -a, ., :.',,,, L , , it..,- , . -;.-&,,-,;,:.4,- ::',-- ,:-4,,..-- ,1',11 16 l' ,?-f-.,e.k, , f tv, , ::::i,,,-1:,o. ts,i.,,I,r 1 . -:-,-.1i-J.4 ., e-4 !, 144,.';::7:,,,1'..,..):,:;3:,,, ., , : ..,172.4.! kirrio , , ,,...,,-,...7...,47 .----, , , st..;:74,12,1,,,,,, , ,-,--:-..- ,.--- .,43..4,f ,,,,-,,,iir,.:,.,,i1.,;-z....,,,,f,,I.,, N, - '',A,e t.... rrt, ,t1,4;eq, zi.lt - t;i, j'. 14-' ',10,1?P'1. 1 1 ;;;;1. i,,.."it, ti .i,. '6, ifilY: , . , --or-- s- -1r --- '"' , ,,,.....0,da f 1 If ...: ''.....:;-r- . :-.:.''''' s'V MRS. II. SIL ER THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY, FAME IN HUB STREETS. Noted People Seen Every Day in Boston. Mese is the Best Known Figure on the Sidewalks of Mobil Athens Great Men Who Walk Among the City's Crowds, but Without Recognition. 0 S T Bostonians s 4 who live in the dearest city in the 11 world are not al- c , re ways properly mind- sost: - N ful of the gift a A-;- s' which is theirs. I 1.g.sl:s Wendell Phillips. it I; :r'r !s.: may be remembered, was so mind- s ful of it that he expressed once in beautiful form his profound affection for the old streets of this old town. It Was when he said that he loved the streets of Boston. those streets over which his mother had guided his infant feet. loved them so well that he never could endure the thought that they might be pressed by the feet of a human slave. And certainly there are no streets in ,t this great country that have sounded so I often to the footsteps of exalted freemen as our dear old streets have sound- t ed. Indeed, there are young men in this t blessed town today who have literally followed in the steps of great leaders, t whose names have been benedictions in j the mouth of tile civilized world. Let us net forget that we W110 are still young have seen the poets Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell and Holmes, the philosopher Emerson, the great leaders Garrison and Phillips, walking modestly through the crowded streets of Boston. And when we think of the feet of pa- triots that rang in the old days on the I brick pavements of this birthplace of American freedom, why, we must not take the supercilious dust of any city in the world! Perhaps it is the familiarity with the great which the Bostonian owns that makes him a little careless as he marches through h:s streets. And yet I there are always a number of figures which attract attention, men whom we salute, and whose salutation we receive although we never have been formally Introduced tet them. They belong to us, and their appearance on the streets is a t feature of the life of Boston. There is ex Gov William E. Russell. ( Ile could not go anywhere in Boston I without being instantly recognized by hundreds. Thousands have heard him speak, and have shaken hands with him. Gov g Greenhalges who has appeared much in public. and for whom so great a number of people voted, is a familiar figure, but not nearly so familiar as ex Gov I Russell. Ex Gov John D. Long probably is a, more familiar figure in the streets than ! Gov Greenhalge. For years he has been observed by thousands. and the active life which he has led as a lawyer since he left the political field has retained for him the memory of multitudes. Ex Mayor Frederic 0. Prince is still a well-known figure in Boston's streets, hut he is not so well known to the rising generation. He was once an exceedingly familiar appearance. but the crowd yearns for new faces. It is many years since Charles Levi Woodbury became familiar to the average Bostonian, and today the sturdy tigure of the judge is one of the striking and very well known incidents of travel through the old town. A dozen years aga Rev Dr Cyrus A. Bartol was well known to nearly every Bostonian that did much traveling in the city. Els is not so familiar a figure now, but anybody who has seen .he venerable preacher. with his white hair flowing in beautiful disorder under a black slouch hat and over bent shoulders, as he makes his slow way, seldom without the support of his daughter's arm. up or down Beacon Hill, never can forget the picturesque and touching spectacle. Edward Everett Hale. a more active but little less patriarchial figure, is seen and recognized by thousands in Boston's streets. lie uses herdics pretty frequently, but he is seen on foot often enough to keep the picture fresh. On State St the venerable but upright form of alatthew Bolles, Boston's oldest banker, is known to every man who has any business in the financial thoroughfare, but perhaps Henry Lee is a better known figure to the general multitude, although of recent years he visits his offices but seldom in a week. But was there ever any character in the streets of this city for whose appearance, when he deigned to Walk abroad, the people craned their necks more excitedly than for the great figure of John Lawrence Sullivan? And how an avenue melted through the packed throng when he moved swiftly up Wash-ington at in the golden days of his prowers. before they made fighting machines out of slender bank clerks "to vex the dull ear of a drowsy man." Then there are figures which we Bostonians lovo to follow through the crowded streetsand whieh we miss now. Some of these are gone, alas! never to return. There was the good bishop. the giant form that looked down with kindly eye , on the pygmy throng. Phillips Brooks was known to more people in Boston than any other clergyman in this town. And the multitudes that have seen John Boyle O'Reilly's athletic figure moving lightly and swiftly through our , streets! And was there a Bostonian who did not know Gen Benj. F. Butler when he saw him? And do not hundreds of us today.when we read or hear sotnething of the man, look involuntarily at the rustling throng, half expecting to observe the tall, straight figure of Gen Patrick A. Collins marching composedly through the crowd? Then there are figures of which a fa- vored few of us catch an occasional glimpsefigures of men whose names are familiar to every Bostonian. An example or two may he mentioned in Thomas Bailey Aldrich, the poet who lives here on Mt Vernon st, but who is seldom seen in Boeton's streets, and in Archbishop Williams, who is hardly ever observed about Boston, except when he occasionally drives through the town. Pres Eliot of Harvard university once in a while is pointed out on State st, but he comes among us seldom. It is very curious and Interesting to observe that some of the men whose names are necessarily very familiar are not known to the average member of a crowd. It will startle a gooft many persons to mention the name of ex May. or Matthews in this list, but the eame belongs there. He was usually not recognized, because he had never been personally prominent as an orator, and when on the occasion of a review of a procession the people saw him, it was only a passing glance of him that was obtained and that was not soon renewea. Mayor Curtis shares the fate of ex Mayor Matthews, only it may be said of him that his is even a very much less familiar figure than his predecessor's was to the multitude. Gen Francis Peabody, Mr Curtis' opponent last year. would have been a very familiar figure to Bostonians if he Sea been elected mayor, since he is a man et' very striking presence. Perimps no man of equal prominence Reed Whisple, owner of the Parker hou t and Young's hotel. and very certain that no man spends more time in walking through the streets every day than he. His travel, however, is eonfined to a route from the Parker house to Young's, anti he makes the journes over this route many times every day. There are some nallR'S whieh are familiar to everybody that has spent any time in Boston, and many of them borne by living- men today in thie eity, , (-ariLik owr-ls. lint till Iiio WI).) bear tt t'angi-s to any ttihreoraedNkisionoofsoNs- L, ifineorre b ; cit(1)(cleN; aP'1,s-esr:i4c, etils; h holt isr se tisfactory There was Melia'si to, h,tano;ye leaders of 11,e Boston bar far almost a b e ye eere of vrs hefore he was Solected many persons in this (Sty k hnew him even by sight? CerteinIN thee csuld numbered ley the hensired. And how many persons krow William G. Russell, the present heat! of the Bos- sift:i.illiss'1"irir10711 1(Isi:grarsetir?JeNs.aitilealittiterlitalliatt:th(l'er' 17VhbellitI End street railroad until recently? Millions rode in his cars, but the people who knew him by sight could be counted In a few minutes. And even a less familiar figure is that of his successor, Mr Samuel Little. John L. Gardner's name is very familiar, but there is no doubt that less than a score of persons would pick hint out in a casual walk tip Washington st. Then there. are William C. Endicott, Mr Cleveland's tirst secretary of war; Charles Frances Adams and Will;am Lloyd Garrison, bearers of two exceedingly conspicuous names In American history; Martin Brimmer, who has been called the first gentleman of Boston today; Gen Charles J. Paine. whose name was on everybody's lips a few years ago when England's yacht raced America's yacht for the great cup; J. Montgomery Sears, the Immensely wealthy landowner of Boston; young Oliver Ames, the son and heir of the late Frederiek Ames, the richest man in New England. The list might be extended, but these names are signifieant enough. llowever, there are at least two exceptions to this list, and they are men who, bearing very distinguished names, are pretty well known to most Bostonians. One is Robert Treat Paine, and the other is Josiah Quincy. and the latter, at least, seems to be destined to be even a good deal better known as the years go by. BUILDING THE BIG DAM, Great Force of Men at Work on the Aqueduct that Will Change the Topography of Clinton and Vicinity. CLINTON. Oct 26The aqueduct and dam departments of the metropolitan water works represent a spirited organization, which is pushing the work vigorously, looking toward the construction of the immense dam to be built at this point to hold back the great accumulation of water which will submerge parts of Clinton. much of West Boylston and wipe out of existence the village of Sawyers Mills, besides changing miles of the course of the Central Alassachusetts railroad division of the Boston Sr Maine system. Beside the preparatory work on the darn there is being done the preliminary work on the two-mile tunnel, seven-mile long brick aqueduct and three miles of open channel, that the water may be conveyed through Berlin and Northboro to the head of basin 5, the basin now being constructed n Southbora and Marlboro. The water from the mammoth basin here will enter basin 5 on the upper part of the Southboro shore line, thence on to Boston via the Sudbury river system. The force now at work here includes 52 men, with 30 of them forming the engineering corps. The complete organization for this work was effected about Aug 1, and it is increasing all the time. Vert soon it will be augmented by 20 men, who will be engaged on land survey. On the Lancaster mill pond are two large rafts which are the scene of busy operations, the purpose of which, in connection with other appliances, is to ascertain what nature has deposited beneath the waters of the pond which shall furnish the foundation for the mammoth dam. A ledge has been struck. the formation of which places it beneath the surface of the pond anywhere from 10 to 60 feet. On two of the rafts are being worked three wash drilla to determine the location of the ledge. These drills have a bbre of 21e2 Inches. but are not for the purpose of penetrating the ledge. That work will be done by a diamond drill. now on its way from Chicago, and which is expected to arrive here the last of the week. When in operation it will take out of the solid rock a core of 13e inches. There have been made 210 borings at the main dam, 50 of them being made two years ago, at the time of the original investigation. and IT test pits have been dug on the main dam. There have also been 160 borings in addition to ascertain the foundations for the dikes. The borings at the main dam are 10 feet apart on the line of the dam. and 20 feet apart across the same. Upon that branch of the Work 15 men are at present engaged. The reselt of boring with the diamend drill will tell the character of the ledge, whether there are large fissures in it or whether the ledge in places is but the natural wall of caves, large or Small. It is estimated that in some places there will be borings with the dr!li 100 feet deep or more. Engineer Richardson states that the character of the earth and rock formation. and the topography of the country indicates that in the glacial period this part of the country experienced some frightful convulsions, and to ascertain the solidity of the ledge discovered is the purpose of the borings about to commence. The ledge will have a 10- foot channel cut through it. There are now in the hands of the printer specifications for the two miles of tunneling to be done and in a very short time bids for doing the work will be solicited. The tunnel is now in proeess of location. Well pits about five feet in diameter are now being dug to ascertain what will constitute the roof of the tunnel. This tunnel will start Just below the main dam and will come out within 100 feet of the Berlin station . on the New Haven railroad. At the latter point there are now a corps of engineers at work. The size of the bore will be 11312 feet, which will be bricked inside. The shallowest shaft to the tunnel is 46 feet. There are two others, 92 and 100 feet respec tively. The aqueduct will be of brick. all underground. and will have a fall of two feet to the mile. The capacity of the facilities for conveying water to basin 5 will he 300,000.000 gallons per day. In Northboro. near Woods mill, on the Berlin road, a ledge will cross the Assabet river, which will be the result of skalful engineering, and in style of construction will be almost a fac simile of the celebrated Echo bridge which spans the Charles river. Whether the well known characteristic which has made Echo bridge famous will be found w hen its counterpart is completed. time only can tell. No echo is called for on the plans and specifications. - In connection with the land survey Just begun. 50 triangular stations nave been established. Engineer e are now running a line of precise levels to the geOths of an inch, and setting precise benches. Levels here are based on those used in the city of Boston, which are based on the coping of the dry dock at Charlestown. and established by the national government. The approximate cost of the dam is given at $1.700,otei. It is estimated that the cost of stripping the basin will be about thrice the cost of the dam. Of the dikes referred to there will be three. each about three-quarters of a mile long. which will be 50 feet wide at the top. will be macadamized and will form part of the boulevard system around the reservoir, which, will all its indentations, will have a shore line of 36 miles. WHAT IS THE AGL OF LOVE? Curious Correspondence on This Question in London Papers. The "Age of Iwe" correspondence in the Daly Telegraph is eliciting some odd statements and amusing glimpses of individual charaeter and views. "Ladies in the bloom of their wrinkles" is one of the funniest definitions of elderly sirens who have proved irresistible, and.according to one of the writers. we must include Helen of Troy amongst the aged charmers. Helen, says the pitiless one, was 80 when 'the ran off with Paris. Cleopatra, we ail know, was old enough for Shakespeare to write of her that "ags" could not wither her she fascinated an amorous Antony of nearly three-seore and ten. But more amusing still Is the letter of a "young lady" .xlio has had "morc . adulation and attention" than falls to the hit of most of her sex, and consequently has had "considerable experlerce in love at all ages." This lady. who at 17 was engaged to "a noble. good man of 35," declares that at .no age has she found the love of roan "so profound, Unre and lasting as from 35 to 40." litt alas! this Avh5e retletion seems to have come too late, for she broke oft the engagement for some trivial cause, and Le, true to his promise never to get. ov-2r rejection, died within three years of an undermined constittitionand a slight cobil---(1.ady's Pictorial. Ealzso's Latest, Just Out There is a book shop in 6th ay. says a New York paper. which has adopted the methods of the dry goods bargain store. There is always a tempting display of wares in the window, with the prices on cards attached to the books. It is evidently managed by a .hustier who knows the ways of bargain day, the ruthless sacrifice, the closing otit slaughter and the forced removal. Hp scorns the conservatism of old-time booksellers, and has started in to show the New Yorkers that the latest style In literature at rock bottom oriees the way to do business. His latest eff(s.rt is now in evidence. His window holds a. modest looking book ove-shadowed by a big card, which is printed. " 'A New Start in Balzac's latest. Just out. Published at $1.50. Our price $1.15." This reminds one of the story of the man, who, being told that the composition to which he had Just listened was by Bach, asked: "is Bach still composing?" and to whom his friend replied; "No; he is deoomposkos." the plan and specifications. on a -modest allowance, but she visited and beautiful gowns, and the double Gowns are rather sober in hue, but s n connection with the land survey a wealthy aunt in London this summer, drawing gives a back and front view of they are trimmed with rich silks and ' P it begun. 50 triangular Stations nave who fitted her out with a season's ward- one of them. although it gives you no velvet and satin plaids. m established. Engineer e are now robe ordered at a court dressmaker's. idea of the clever aever combination of colors Ethelyn Friend. nning a line of precise levels to the They aro lovely gowns . but all blouses and the beauty of the materials used. - ths of an inch, and setting precise and untrimmed skirts, and my friend The gown is built of a glossy black - , nehes. Levels here are based on those ha come back to Paris to find that w ' ohair in a crepon weave and skirt and P,d in the city of Boston. which are these are no longer considered. Of basque are cut s P fi Uith many seam' s . All CITIZENS BORN AT SEA. 0 sed on the coping of the dry dock at course, we shall see them, but they will the seams in the skirt and waist and Unexplained Partiality They Show for , e arlestown. and established by the be confounded with last winters gowns. even three lengthwise seams that are tional government. and the most independent woman arranged in the gigot sleeves, are opened Chicago as Place of Residence. ro,wpaerhlianpes,ofawhthitierdsaotfinaendgiendchb.y tao wlfrh hcaolsumrenceninry thbeeenfedceormalplecteendsuiss The approximate cost of the dam is doesn't enjoy that. 1 ' ,-en at $1.70atost. It is estimated that Moreover, the new basques are prone sfeh ,! cost of stripping the basin will be to be more becoming to all except very tracery of fine jets. - 1 out thrice the cost of the dam. young women than the old blouses and The bodice is fitted except !n front set aside for the small number of those )f the dikes referre,d to there will be belts and nothing is nicer than the where it is :Arranged in .,oft folds over . who come under the, elesseleetion "Born . ree. each about three-quarters of a smart jacket bodices of flowered silk. the bust. On each side of th e bust e t i s a le long. whh will be 50 feet wide at These are really fitted waists, with stiff little pointed fall of green velvet . Though under the ?iaturaliation laws . e top, will be macadamized and will jacket ie skirte, and any pretty arrange- There is no belt, but in the hack. at at sea." z - of the United States the citivensnin of m ven Away . rm part of the boulevard system ment of revers and collar. And then the waist line. are placed two ore aund the reservoir, which, will all its they admit of such exquisite and be- little velvet falls similar. but a trifle eueh persons is conditional upon thei , r lentations, will have a shore line of coming chemisettes and etocks. than the ones on the front of haying been born ir a ship flying the smaller, miles. the bodice. and try kmerican flag, the cenens eeleials make HAT IS THE AG OF LOVE P . IggfP'''' ' abIrhuet the straight reeadei gxsattetnphdet iheoolxitlkag choker the ti if en .ude , choker ofi tokeremrs forming ail sglhexh.0: lightly hyh.. no such distinction, but include all those ., born at sea under a single subdivision plain it in detail, for it is so very pretty. In First there is a deep square collar, rpirIraetssitpsheeata-adpive of the national flag at the i o rius orrespn ence on is Ues- Cod Th Q r, e ...,.. , . lectiden Papers. dlt7I'li utsite yellow la 1 eocful'itrri;:yhihp: tion in ?rettlfere remarked Valuable Premiums . rhe "Age of bette" correspondence in .01 l -.,i4 1141 er and again shown in the .ast census that e . Daily Telegraph is eliciting some , e-. : e' . dotted with jets. These ehTdehsleeanc eftoh;riemirseo adnerleeolu)siiidEtlee:alptlioleenetet selsslol fiot zt. over rteajtt7hnte.. the favorite city of res:dence of persons t sea n ak a cr ee ure tyai , . il statements and amusing glimpses Iblolt.mmaotreset c hataeter and v iews . C 1i; to the consumers of individual , 'Ladles in the bloom of their wrink- ,), )) . -, is e definitions of - .. . dents at tileisrsisotinnCalehboicoarfgneoa' C hicago than of ; one of th funniest d top of the sleeves. and a flaring collar - that BEST'of . lerly sirens who have proved irresist- 4...!. ee- any other city of the Unital States. e, an elie on each side. These sides are lined reaccording to one of the writers. 'V' e -..."- lining ruffles along the edge and forms I with green velvet, apd in the back the New York comes next, and then, in - , . snude Helen of T roy amongst - .--- r mut i cl -- , ese aged charmers. jabots of green velvet to match those ,roportion to the roptilation. St Louis. Against the city of Brooklyn. persons all Washd . ,, Helen, says the pitiless one, was 80 .) ingPowers t - , at the waist line. born at sea have. or seetn to have hen 'the ran off with Paris. Two or three inehes of the plain satin deep feeling of revoisian, which, to a eleopat ra V. w choker show in front but only a ry limited extent is shown toward Yon- , e ail knobs was old , little in the back. ers as a p - , ve11:7111: telst ae York Sun. s . ough for Shakespeare to write of her ,, klace of 1 ll ,73ide!P. There are ar et "age" could not wither her wh The rest is entirely covered by the several thouand en side perms in the Un -t. le atecinated an amorous Antony of sseited de pieces. states who were tern at sea.---(New A any three-seore and ten. At this house they are But more amusing still Is the letter of bnauc.kbearnf w g ornotThfel sias diests ,, sIditttd he . "young lady" who has had "more ,v m Shanted Notice. - 1 illation and attention" than falls to i-, e kit of has had consirlrable expe most of her sex, and conse- r ,I gathered, jabot fashion, over the bust. CoronerYe 'W ou saY you told the servant en 1 ,tly "e- They are very pretty. to get out of the house the minute you ' -.eye In love at all ages." . a I discovered the fire They show few belts, none, I was go- This lady. who at 17 wee engaged to re , , -',, mg to say, but I remembered such a , and she refused to . , ' t tioble, good man of 35," declares that , ,,cfr oharreing frock which boasts a very go? Among Which Are g e) , elaborate belt. Mrs BurntoutYes, sir; she said she ' $500 Henry Miller Piano Buve come too late, for she broke o : ,Tio ae has she found the love of must have a month's notice before an o profo "sund true arel lasting as , t . 007,1 I will tell you about it. The gown e she d think of leavi is built of black satin and tr ionne witti 'ng.--(Tit-Bits. om 35 to 40." eteArt air , ''''' i,' t. alas! this Wh5e retleetion seems - '' " -,f2Ali, a rich fancy satin, showing an irregu- , haft tete vele i'' la r design on a black ground. HE I ' i e engagement for some trivial cause, On the very edge of the skirt are two I Ai T woRLD $300 Estey Family Organ el Le, trite to his promiee never to get ill LIX STREET GOWN. rows of double ruching. one of green i ts a rather seant volant. about eight etr rejection, died Yellin three years and one of rose satin ribbon. Over this an undermined constitutionanil a -- ---- ---- ---- OF' BEAUTY $100Wheeler&WilsonSevalilachille g f, iht colilltlade's Pictorial.' hes deep, of the fancy satin, headed , y a thick ruching of mousseline de ., distinctive feature of a new gown. but - ye...4 0 r . Ealzac's Latest, Just Out." - ! I want to warn my reader against adil- sele . very and Poifeeceo8u r b are t hbeeyeeamreinfzi n e . I he biaek satin boilice is covered wile ,e' . el :'. l, . $100 Lovell Diamond Bicycle , -I There is a book shop in 6th as . says ing there to any style of gown With the black 1 1,01 IS SPline de sole. laid on IV it il ' r' - i - -5. 1" 1 I hit N, e -'67 T, 4 X 4, . . rv little fullness There Is a deep , e k 1 I eeen this done in several eces. ane ,'e - . , i 4 , and 42 other prizes, such as Dis- t the dry entitle bargeln - e methods o es -, ' ' the results have been eisastroute sattlite nd yineer the collar ,whih - square collar ll eoft jabot vest of the ee ' I -te , New York paper, which has adopted ore n the ir . There is always a tempting dis idea of bringing it up to in dat tane. 4 . e et mords, Watches, Chamber Bets, ;J ay of wares i wplow. with the ing nee ehould mi be worn with a toms are soft a am., c oker, r uffles . 111p .. Cameras, Clocks, Etc ices on cr . i ads attached book pointed aist or bas to the s. Wmte-shaved bo dice. of the motssellne tit, sole. " 4.-,, it is evidently managed by a .hustler The godet hip pieces le or r the ',lain liar ith a blonse w and aist thev are entirely The be is formed of three twists of ho knows the ways of bargain day W , out of keeping. take away rathir ve let . one of gr ee n on , e of rose and . Ailks ov Each ckage contains a FULL e ruthless sacrifice, the CIOSing Olq. than add character to a gOW11. ne ri dull yellow. - 1 e a descripthe catalogue and a useful , ' Aughter and the forced removal. He I am going to confine myself today to o This touch of yellow is etrangely 3,11 ,,,,, 4 1 . pa . and dVerent present needed in i OT13S the conservatism of old-time teeming and afternoon gowns and tie. effective. ioksellers, and has started in to show every household. Ary itbrmation , lir e New Yorkers that the latest style the different t ilaces for out-of-door cos- blue woel gowns. Indeed. a navy blue i 1 ii"e. t4. V e i freely eivea by seeding stamp and eeribe the best of the models shown by They also show a number of navy wool will be the most popular street e V literature at rock bottom priees is tames. , i lit,1 .. full address to i t. e way l to do business. Feli O e x shWS ver so many gowns ot gown this season. Hs ates effete is now in evidence. navy blue woo and the heavy new one of blue mohair has a band of Is window t holds a modest looking l !lair is a favorite material. Ills silk alfie about the bottom of the skirt. IS SUE'll 03,110 SAVENA MIFC. CO., tok Ye-shadowed by a big card, on gowns are trimmed with volants. but over ti t flttea beeee is whet ni.ght -- hich le printed. " A New Start in cloth and evool gowns have often a be termed a skeleton jacket of blue Net only is it the most effective skin pure 204 Broadway, annbridgeport, 1 fe,' Balzac's latest. Just out. Pub trimming running tip the seams. Ile velvet. in the same slime., as the wool. fying anti beautifying soap in the world. but , ihed at $1.50. Our price $1.15." Ftill ShOWS the two cuts of skirt. the Th is is edge d v .eth a betel of sable. It it is the purest, sweetest. and most refreshing . This reminds one of the stI.3. of the umbrella skirt. with many seams. Which consists only of s tr aps in the b k but ac, for toilet, ha-,,h, and nursery. It strikes at the - eause of bad complexione, falling hair, and - ItOn,TiotristeduepoteettestaveRsOultnity. nr r; an, who, being told that the compoei- when the skirt is to forms epaulettes over the sleeves, and largest stork ta Boston. J. OTIS 18.. simple baby blemishee viz.,: Tiik CLOOGED, WeLL PAVERBlanks 4e, gilts ec. golds 6e. , A very dark green caractile makes an tn te which he had just listened was !rt. gterniginaleitT, ta!enetill the godet skirt . with falls in straitjacket pieces in front. r "i Bch still orn- the In the back. best gilt molding le a foot; Bach, asked: s a buy goods Of Illa 'sing?" " and to whom his friend c e sams re- Both skirts t and sleeves are moderate effective street costume. The skirt and IsgertrterettliElle'll'0nytEZ:011:e M- led; No; he i decompong bln sie, s sk." , z awl he latter hav tendenc sleeves are very moderate, and the only a a y t ) LoaiZoa. romit Dialo keasit. Gov., Bows, Ud-ta; I rADDEN, 23 Curnbill, near Waehle to t i- g 14 , . , , I , , '-' . , . . , , . , . , - , -' , . , - ----------- ------ -------- ,.,-'--""" - ....., MIIngf OCTOBER 27 1895 "Style awl Economy." Week Beginning 3londay, ()et. 28. WOWEN.S and IHILDREN'S 1WINTER COATS. , The Styles Have Changed. I I In the Last Two Weeks. 1 Xew ideas have come from Paris., Berlin, London anti Nezo York. The inew styles have two advantages: ; I. They will n-t be as common as the earlier 1 styles, of which most houses have a large quantity 1 on band. 1 I I. They will be good style next year. PRICEIB 1 S5 00 TO $50 00 1 1 We quote one lot to know bow prices run. The New "Persian Coal" Fancy silk lining throughout body and sleeves, ham all the new ideas, made from a beautiful glossy Persian cloth, correct tailor-made style in ht every way. The Rig 15 00 The Hight Cloth. Style. Order by Mall. Send payment. Money back if wanted IMINIZZatarmingamonsammommilli BEAR MISTAKES IN STYLE American Girl Who Will Wear Last Year's. Morning an,1 Afternoon Gowns from the Very Best Paris Models. Valuable hints for Those Who Make Their Own or the Dresses of Others. PARIS, Oct 20There is a current saying that. even in Paris, one should not buy autumn and winter frocks until the first of October, and that the early styles are simply "fakes" to catch the unwary. GUSTAVE BEERS There is some truth in this statement unless the buyer be experienced and exercises discretion. The designers must show something new. but one who carefully considers the past mode and its tendencies can judge very nearly what the next turn of the wheel will be. I am very glad that I have made no mistakes in my summer accounts of autumn and winter fashions to The Sunday Globe readers. The gowns described in early August letters are being shown today by the leading couturieres as the proper and only autumn models. The jacket bodice, pointed waist, basque and flaring hip pieces all prevail, and the blouse waist. even In a modified form and in its new cut, is entirely a side issue. This Is causing despair to many women. who have ordered winter gowns. ignoring these models. which indeed, were kept rather In the background by the couturieres. I have a little American friend who is so unfortunate. She has lived for two years in Paris and through her own cleverness dressed a la derniere mode on a 'modest allowance, but she visited a wealthy aunt in London this summer, who fitted her out with a season's wardrobe ordered at a court dressmaker's. They aro lovely gowns . but all blouses and untrimmed skirts, and my friend has come back to Paris to find that these are no longer considered. Of course, we shall see them. but they will be confounded with last winter's gowns. and the most independent woman doesn't enjoy that. Moreover, the new basques are prone to be more becoming to all except very young women than the old blouses and belts, and nothing is nicer than the smart jacket bodices of flowered silk. These are really fitted waists, with Jacket skirts, and any pretty arrangement of revers and collar. And then they admit of such exquisite and becoming chemisettes and stocks. FELIX STREET GOWN. The godet bip pieces are becoming very prpular. and of course they are a distinctive feature of a new gown. but I want to warn my reader against adding them to any F. tyle of gOWn with the idea of bringing it up to date. I hit c seen this done in sevfxal instances. and the results have been disastrous. The godet hip pieces or the ulain flaring ones ,S hou1d nlv be worn with a pointed waist or basque-shaved bodlee. With a blouse waist thev are entirely cut of keeping. anti take away rathcr than add character to a gown. I am going to confine myself today to n.crning and allernoon gowns and do seribe the best of the models shown by the different places for out-of-door costumes. Felix shows ever so many gowns ot navy blue wool and the heavy new MO. !lair Is a favorite material. His silk gowns are trimmed with volants. but cloth and wool gowns have often a trimming runnins . up the seams. Ilt, still shows the two cuts of skirt. the umbrella skirt. N th many seams. which is generally used when the skirt is to he trimmed, anti the godet skirt. with , the seams In the back. Both skirts and sleeves are moderatit Lln blze, awl the latter havf a tencienc sr. .6 ce,,,t,..u71; ..,,,.,...;. ,, ,i .,.. ,1 2,,,..,.., ,,,,,..,,:.;4,1;;.,firt ., 7 ,...e.c;,.:;:,,,.t 117 it ; -1,,w , I, 7,, ,,,,, , I ,, , -, . ,ii, ' i ' i , i . a . ii, ., , i k,C31,-c , , , , It le I I ilk 1 1 fr t 1 I i 1 I , , , , , , e t , , . ' I t 1 I t N . N , , ) 1 s , . THIRTY-SIX PAGES. 6''" SILK WAISTS. Two Most Uttusual Values. Plaid Sik Waists. very latest style, Bishop sleeves, velvet collar and cuffs, latest blouse effects in medium and !aright colors; these waists cannot be duplicated for less than $7.50 4 89 100 Silk Waists in red, green and black stripes and changnble figures, large sleeves, box plait front. The lowest pr:ce gal elk puu 11011I 1110 lowest pr.ca yet made 2.69 Ozi ler by Mail. Send bai-k if wanted SEPARATE DRESS SKIRTS. An Extrewnlinary Sale t,e'Ve.,!,11y1,:lr: Dress Skirts of Black Figured Mohair, Tan Eerges, and Brilliantines, lined throughout and stiffened I E g1.1 Dress Skirts of all-wool Cheviots and Serges, lined throughout and stiffened, bang and fit perfectly s Dress Skirts of imported Black erepou and beautiful Woolen Novelties, lined throughout and stiffelied, latest correct style 5 00 Beautiful Brocaded Satin Dress Skirts, swell skirts of the season, beautiful patterns," N w Octagon" shape, rustling linings 1250 Order by Mail. Send uay went. Money back if wanted. TOMORROW. A NEW BEAUTY VEIL, New "Billy Spot," white on black and all black. Order by 31 all. Send payment. Money bark If wanted to fall well away frcan the shoulders soft plaits. Indeed. no tirst-class house shows now the extreme stiffened balloon sleeves. It smacks of side street dressmakers and the ready-made blouses in the shop whitlows. Felix has used his most cxtreme fancies in evening and reception toilettes. His street gowns as yet are rather conservative, although. of course, they are very lovely and contain some new ideas. He has a very smart street gown of a silky navy blue mohair, with a vest of a rich cashmere velvet. Across the back is a flat square collar: it ruffles over the sleeves and descends in revers on each side of the vest, meeting In a point Just below the waist lire. - This is lined with a dull, gold satin, one of the shades in the velvet. The basque is cut with a slight paint, and the skirt has plaited hip pieces, MODE rather short, and lined with the gold 't satin. And then there is such a charming gown of tabac brown wool with a row of sable about the bottom of the skirt. The bodice has a fitted waist of the wool, and over it a surplice front of a fancy silk in which there Is a good deal of ibis pink. This fastens under the arm with a row of large fancy buttons. The fancy silk is only on the front of the basque and the surplice turns away In revers to form a point just above the bust. This is completed by a chemisette and half choker of mull This is joined by two fancy buttons, to a flaring collar of the wool, lined with ibis pink which extends about the back of the neck. I wish to branch off one moment to speak of a clever little Felix cape. It Is built of dull red cloth and heavily embroidered in plush threads. The design is conventionalized and rather oriental, and there is a good deal of green used in it. The cape has a yoke of green velvet which rises to form a flaring collar, and It is trimmed all about with glossy black fur. Gustave peer is showing some novel and beautiful gowns, and the double drawing gives a back and front view of one of them, although it gives you no idea of the clever combination of colors and the beauty of the materials used. The gown is built of a glossy black wohair in a erepon weave, and skirt and basque are cut ulth many seams. All the seams in the skirt and waist and even three lengthwise seams that are arranged in the gigot sleeves, are opened for, perhaps, a third of an inch. to show a line of white satin edged by a tracery of fine jets. The bodice is fitted except in front, where it is :Arranged in zolt folds over the bust. On eaeh side of the bust is a stiff little pointed fall of green velvet. There is no belt, but in the back. at the waist line. are placed two more little velvet falls similar. but a trifle smaller, than the ones on the front of the bodice. The gown is elaborately trimmed abbut the neck. and I must try to explain it in detail, for it is so very pretty. First there is a deep square collar, front and back, and forming a h:gh straight choker of white satin. With the exception of the choker this is covered with exquisite yellow lace, lightly dotted with jets. Then there are side pieces of the jetted lace also mounted on white satin. These form deep epaulettes over the top of the sleeves. and a flaring collar on each side. These sides are lined with green velvet, and in the back the lining ruffles along the edge and forms jabots of ereen velvet to match those at the waist line. Two or three inehes of the plain satin choker show in front, but only a very little in the back. The rest is entirely covered by the side pieces. At this house they are making a number of round waists, fitted in the back and on the sides, with fullness gathered, jabot fashion, over the bust. They are very pretty. They show few belts, none, I was going to say, but I remembered such a ohartning frock which boasts a very elaborate belt. I will tell you about it. The gown is built of black satin and trimmed with a rich fancy satin, showing an irregular design on a black ground. ()n the very edge of the skirt are two ! rows of double ruching. one of green and one of rose satin ribbon. Over this is a rather seant volant. about eight :nches deep, of the fancy satin, headed by a thick ruching of mousseline de sole. The black satin bodice is covered with black mousseline de sole, laid on with very little fullness. There is a deep sentare collar and soft jabot vest of the fancy satin, and under the collar,which forms a flarieg choker. are soft ruffles of the moessenne de sole. The belt is formed of three twists of velvet. one of green, one of rose and one el dull yellow. This touch of yellow is strangely effective. They also show a number of navy blue wool gowns. Indeed. a navy blue wool will be the most popular street gown this season. tine of blue mohair has a band of sable about the bottom of the skirt. over ti t fltted boeice is whet m!ght be termed a skeleton jacket of blue velvet. in the same shade as the wool. This is edged wlth a band of sable. It consists only of straps in the back, but forms epauiettes over the sleeves, and falls in straitjacket pieces in front. A very dark green caractile makes an effective street costume. The skirt and SleeVeS are very moderate, and the only INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S DEPT. Extraortliaary Sale ottalanterlanaela Lot 1Infants' Shaker Flannel Pinning Blankets, well made. Regular Price 25c., for this a osh sale Z 2C Lot 2Long and Short Skirts, made of good quality Shaker Flannel, sizes up to 3 years. Always Sold for 37c., for this sale a..111; Lot 3Lone and Short Skirts, made of all-wool flannel, sizes up to 3 years. Regular Price 87c., for this sale 50c Lot 4Long and Short All-Wool Flannel Skirts, feather stitched seams and hem. Regular Price 8n $1.50, for this sale 1 Lot of Children's Dresses in a variety of Novelty cloths, newest fall styles, extra full skirt, lined throughout, all sizes 6 to14 year,. Regular Price $2.50 I 69 Order by Mad. Send payment. Money back If wanted. FUR DEPT. We sell only warranted Furs. satisfaction guaranteed on every purchase. We invite you to inspect our department ischether you purchase or not. Below we quote a few special values for this week : Electric Seal Capes, best quality, 30 incbes long, extra full sweep, plain or fancy H1111127. Regular 32 50 price $45.00 Baltic seal Capes, with best quality Black Thibet collar and edge, 30 inches long, 100 sweep. Regular 14 00 price $18.50 Baltic Seal Capes, 30 in. long. very full sweep. lates, style in every way. 11 50 Regular Price $15.00 Genuine Marten, Mink or Persian Lamb Trimming 1 inch wide, lined SI ..00 1m. Chinchilla, 1 inch wide 50c French Seal, 1 inch wide I 9c Ostrich Boas. yard long $3.98 onter by Mail. r".end payment- Money back It a anted HOSIERY. A Genuine 50c. Quality Ladies" English Black Cashmere Hose, double soles and high spliced heels. Also Children's Full Fashioned Cash- "m mere HOE e, 6 to 81. Per Pair tiZiJk; Order by Ma 1. t.ead payo,ent. Money back if wanted 111 trimming is a deep collar of brownish lace, mounted on dark red cloth. Touches of warm red are very appropriate for autumn days, and occur in many charming costumes. A brown wool novelty has the seams in the front and on the sides of the skirt. trimmed with a red and gold braiding. This braiding does not extend above the knees, and is graduated in length. The waist is a jacket bodice trimmed by a lot of small gold buttons, and with a flat vest of red cloth, embroidered with gold. At Doucet's there are also a lot of navy blue gowns. One is very pretty, with a bodice of fancy , silk, and plaited coat tails of blue velvet. There is a large flaring collar of blue velvet, which descends In a scant jabot down each side of the vest. This is edged with brown fur, and the vest is covered with falis of yellow lace. Another very smart gown is of navy blue wool, with the skirt trimmed with two rows of wide black braid, one at the hem and the second about a foot above. The basque has coat tails and hip pieces added to it. These are edged with black braid. Over the shoulders and about the neck is a double collar of white corduroy velvet, something like a scant ruche. The basque has short jacket sides, that open over a waistcoat of corduroy, trimmed with two rows of gilt buttons. One of the prettiest models there is a princess gown of gray watered silk, trimmed with gold embroidery, heavy ecru lace and prune velvet, and the sing'e sketch is of this gown. Nothing is more fetching than a princess gown when it is perfectly cut, as of course this one is. The skirt has a little gold embroidery about the bottom. and the embroidery extends up the front seams. The back of the gown is plain and untrimmed. In front there are short jacket sides, which are gold-embroidered. There is a flat, narrow vest of prune velvet, with a jabot of lace on each side. The choker is of prune velvet and lace, with an enormous bow in the back. The lace commences on the choker, at the point from where the jabots start, leaving the front of the collar plain, as if a continuation of the vest, falls over the top, and forms heavily plaited wings between the loops of the bow in the back. You see that the moire is in favor again, but as yet I have only seen it used for the whole gown. never as trimming. It comes in Ecil the new shades, and the waves are quite different from any seen before. Corduroy velvet and the corduroy cloths are very much used. Doucet's favorite model seems to be the jacket basque, with smart plaited coattaits. This waist is fitted, and may have an elaborate collar and buttoned in fiat vest. The only likeness to a jacket lies in the hip pieces. which are generally very short and full. and the coattails. Buttons of all kinds are very much used, large and small; mock jewels, miniatures, small gold and brass buttons and a lot of cloth buttens. Gowns are rather sober in hue, but they are trimmed with rich silks and velvet and satin plaids. Ethelyn Friend. CITIZENS BORN AT SEA. Unexplained Partiality They Show for Chicago as Place of Residence. One column in the federal census which has recenry been completed is set aside for the small number of those who come under the, 21assuication "Born at sea." Though under the ?iaturalization laws of the United States the citivensnin of much persons is COMIltiOnal upon their having been born ir a shin flying the kmerican flag, the cetisns tmi-ials make no such distinction, but include all those born at sea under a single subdivision Irrespective of the national flag at the roasthead of It is a peculiarity heretofore remarked and again shown in the .ast census that the favorite city of res:dence of persons born at sea is Chicago. Cook eCunty. More persons born at sea are residents at this time of Chicago than of any other city of the Unitel States. New York comes next, and then, in Proportion to the ropulation. St Louis. Against the city of Brooklyn. persons born at sea have. or seem to have, a deep feeling of revoisian, which, to a limited extent, is shown toward Yonkers as a place of 1,73idell!P. There are several thousand persons in the United States who were torn at sea.---(New York Sun. She NV anted Notice. CoronerYou say you told the servant to get out of the house the minute you discovered the bre, and she refused to go? Mrs BurntoutYes, sir; she said she must have a month's notice before she'd think of leaving.---(Tit-Bits. IN THE WORLD 0 JP BEAUTY 44 A 0 Is SUIPTI -0110 - -Not only is it the most effective skin purifying and beautifying soap in the world. but It is the purest, sweetest. and most refreshing for toilet, bah, and nursery. It strikes at the eaus3 of had complexions. falling hair, and simple baby blemisheS. V iZ. THE CtrioCiED, INF I, IIED,b ERWORKED,OI SLUGGISH POHL OVERWORKED""'"'''''' L '''.' ' Wix1.1.. PAI'EltBilinks Se. gilts 5c, golds Se. ANFLASIED9,Ot oUGGISICE-Oltit. best gilt moursg I i lc a toot; buy goods of numHold throurboot the world glitlihdepost NIWIIIRT of r; largest otork la Boston. J. OTIS M. LottiZois. l'orEzit Dituo a c v flask calm. Go., s, Ud-ta; I rADDEN, 23 Cynthia, aear Wablaoston. , t i , A RAIN-P1-00F GARMENT DEPT. - The leading dept.Semnd to none in this country. Ready Tomorrow at 8 A. M. Flue Cloth Mackintoshes, double textures lined throughout, full double military capes, inserted velvet collars, correct style in every way 5 00 The lowest price yet made. Order by Mail. Send rayment. Jdoney back if wanted CORSETS. We sell erelg leading make of Corsets' and fit same free of charge, SPECIAL TOMORROWRegular $1.75 quality, male by manufac- turer of the celebrated C. P.Venus, and are an exact reproductionextra long waist 5-hook, Venus back, 2 sides steels, 9 ell white and black, per pair Order by Man. Send payment. Money backlt wanted CLOVES. We sell none but warranted Gloves. SPECIAL TOMORROW. Ladies' 4-Button Dogskin Cloves, wide embroidered backs, all warranted, tans and browns, worth $1.00, 6" only Infants' Silk and Wool Mixed Mittens, in white and reds splendid values. lk; Order by mail. Send payment. Money back if want AN EXTRAORDINARY OFFER. We shalt place on sale tomorrow, Petticoats, TOMORROW, Regular Price S3.50 and $4. g109 Lined throughout and Velvet bound. - There are 150 skirts in the lot, ell nude, from best quality All-Wool fillohairs, Brilliantine and Sicilian Cloths, trimmed with umbrella rags, double raffles, silk embroidered raffles, ins sreat many desirable styles. The best wearing goods made. - Order by Mail. Send payment. Money back tt wanted WRAPPERS. Special sale of Ladies Cambric Wrap pers, with mite over shoulder, watteau back; extra full skirts and large sleeves, all BIM and 110t a bad pattern in the entire lot, my ank actual value $1.00 WUHeavy Flannelette Wrappers, with Cellar, cuffs, pointd girdle, and wide revers of cashmere, braid trimmed, colors brown, red and black, lowest former price $2.00 I 69 ' Order by Mail. Send payment. Money be if wanted ORDER BY MAIL ALL COODS ADVERTISED. Send payment with order. Money back if wanted WASHINGTON S To .2 Winter St. 111111111111111P 1 VICTORIA BATHING. , Machines to Bathe in and Sailors to Mar the Life Boat. During the recent sojourn of the court at Osborne, sea bathing was a regulai item in the daily program. On the private beach, near the queen's jetty. there is a barge with a hollow center. whick can be quickly run along a rail Into the sea. The bottom of this barge is so ar,. ranged that the water comes in at once.' and the center becomes a tank. which ruskes a Erst rate bathing place for children. This was daily used by the families of the duke and duchess of Connaught an4 Prince and Princess Henry of Batten-berg. Off this beach there is also a gloating bath, which consists of a well. 30 feet by 10 feet, with a wooden grating at the bottom, which can be adjusted so as to afford the requisite depth of water. There is a dressing room and the whole structure is enclosed by a screen. A small lifeboat, manned by two sailors frcm the royal yacht, Is always in attendance in Osborne bay dcring bathing hours. The queen has a bath of warm sea water at Osborne every morn- ing.--(London Sketch. Dancing by Telephone. A story comes from Vienna of dancing by telephone. The ball took place in the Hungarian town of Temesvar, preceded by a concert, the audience listening at loud-speaking telephones fixed against the wall round the room to a military band which was playing in Arad, to operatic selections given by artistes in the theaters at Budapest, and to popular songs which were being given in Szegedin. Then the room was cleared, and hunl dreds of young people danced for hours to music played in all these towns. $12,500 Will Be Given Away In Valuable Premiums to the consumers of that BEST 'of all Washing Powders SAVE 'A, Among Which Are $500 Henry E Miller Piano, $300 Estey Family Organ, ROO Wheeler Wilson Sevez Machine $100 Lovell Diamond Bicycle, and 42 other prizes, such as Diamonds, Watches, Chamber Sets, Cameras, Clocks, Etc. Each package contains a FULL descriptive catalogue and a useful and d.1:erent present needed in every household. Ay ittirmation freely given by sending stamp and full address to SAVENA MIFC. Co., 204 Broadway, Cauthridgeport, t I . . , , .. , , kVISlF' L. ,I.Nr'll' - , -.2- -E , , r -1,, -.-. , -----, 7 ',.,--i ;------- 4 , s, -- - ,, ?,--i---,,,,,,, ' le S14,., - i wi- .-, 4,--- I --- - w - A ,,.. nTniliontarytrhIle. - f , r. 00 - , !wanted - tweets, goiar, 2 - Latac--T Dnug,' g waist 1 8c - '- !wanted - , ' 'see,' ' I ,tat 9c , ws.te , t, ti )ifiro F I 9 1, ; - . . i ) made ! ' oths, i) DItyles. !. wanted !I k I Vra Itt backi - I Ins and P 9d :1 3,witb even - ' Przti re4 , 69 - wsnted ODS ISED - wanted re from ler St, - MIN t i o Mar court egulai - 11t3 Dri- - - : ' there t which, Lte the, ;. so - , , t once' whicl; - - C)311hlaoleta se st tfa neleontettot- lOa - 111'!::: ting at the water. I whole r0 sail- raYs in c bath- lath ' morn- ' deeo henpheocudului n aenr rs s ri - , ' In the d Ling at tgaInst - illitary ad. to stes in Szege- 1 .- ,k

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