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The Boston Globe from Boston, Massachusetts • 14

Publication:
The Boston Globei
Location:
Boston, Massachusetts
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14
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THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-HAY 9. 1915 LUSITANIAS SURVIVORS. LUSITANIA FIREMEN ON LAST NEW YORK TRIP. ODD CALL FOR JUSTICE LUSITANIAS FA Alphabetical List of All Known to Have Been Saved. LOSING FAITH IN i BOOTS NAVY, American Naval Men Discuss Disaster, Germans Declared to Hare Outwitted ttia Allies, wmm BBI Views Various, But Generally Germans Held Responsible.

pssssssss NEW YORK, May 8 Alphabetical lists of the first and second cabin survivors of the Cunard Liner Lusitania are given herewith. They are followed by a list containing the names of survivors among the steerage passengers and crew of the Lusitania, differentiated when possible. When the Lusitania left New York, May 1, she had aboard, according to the latest available a total of 1901 persons. Of these 1251 were passengers and 650 crew. Of the passengers there were 291 in the fii-st cabin, 599 in the second and S61 in the steerage.

SURVIVORS OF FIRST CABIN. ADAMS. MRS HENRY, of Boston. ADAMS. MRS JANE.

ADAMS, WILLIAM McMILLAN, of FOSS. CARL ELMER. FREEMAN, JOHN, Falklatn, C. FROST, H. Regina.

Can. FYFE, Mrs JEANIE, Holyoke, Masa neutrality Urged Till Facts Are Known British Navy Criticised for Inaction. Ifer i S-tv Jtr SjO'fj I the ought to do is a much more difficult question. It is quite dangerous for individuals to attempt to advise The fullest knowledge of fat ts. coupled with the most senous i espon-sibiiitics, rest and ought to rest with the Government at achirgton Required to Spare Life.

Dr George II. Blake.slee, professor of international law at Clark University, Worcester, said "If a German sub-1 marine sank the Lusitania without warning, with a resulting large loss of I life among her American passengers, it. Is the most serious event of the war, so! far as the United States is concerned, "If the Lusitania has been sunk by mine, it is doubtful if our Government has any clear ground of action, since, International law has not definitely pro-j hiblted the laying of mine fields in the open sea. "International law has made no regulations with special regaid to submarines, but it has clearly established the rule that no warship may sink any merchant or paksenger ship, whether it belongs to enemy or neutral, unless it flrBt makes arrangements for the safety of the passengers and crew. "It makes no difference whether the ship carries contraband or not, the pas-sengeis and crew must first be saved.

The only possible justification that occurs to me is that tiie Lusitania fired on a German submarine This is not likely. "If the Lusitania was torpedoed without warning and when making no re sistance, and so against international law, the United States has legal ground of action against Germany and may, in the words of the United States, "protest to Germany and hold the Imperial Government to the strictest accountability. But what course the Government will take in such a grave crisis is not clear." LUSITANIA PASSENGERS FROM NEW ENGLAND The torpedoing and sinking of the Lusitania with the appalling loss of Ufa ot innocent people, including more than 100 American citizens. waa the upper-moat topic in every mind and on every tongue yesterday. Everybody condemna It from the moral and humanitarian land points, but there are many who question If Geimany can be held legally responsible In the case.

Authorities on international law differ in their opinions. Prof Albin L. Rlt hards, formerly of the Department of International Law at Harvard University, nays. I am inclined to think that the Germans are right in the attitude they have taken, far as the Lumtar.ia is concerned, ami Ism by no meins certain that any claim made by the Lnited States for the lives and property of citizens would be adjudicated in our lavor. I hope that dealing with this distressing affair of the Lusitania, the press will continue to maintain tho commendable self-restraint which, so Jar as 1 nave observed it.

has been shown up to the present time in discussing the European War. "President Wilson is entitled to the gratitude of all Americans for his strict observance of the principles of neutrality and the other rules of international law. Other Cases More Serious. 'from a legal standpoint, the treatment of the Lusitania is much less serious matter than the sinking of ths William P. Frye, or the attack which is said to have been made upon an American ship by aeroplane.

"The Lusitania was a British ship, and there is no doubt that the Germans had the right to deprive the British of their property in that ship. "Ths general practice, of course, is to bring an enemys ship into port as a prise and by a decree of a prize court transfer the property fn her from the enemy to the purchaser in the prize court proceedings. "This practice has two advantages. It permits ths fact that ths ship is enemys property to be clearly established and allows neutrals a right to be heard upon that question. "It also permits the belligerent making the capture to get the benefits of the proceeds of the sale; which are1 usually divided between the officers and crew of the capturing vessel and their Government.

"Evidently, in a case In which there la no question as to the ship being enemy property, the price court proceedings mar be omitted without neutrals having anv cause of complaint, so far as the destruction of the property in the ship is concerned. When Proper to Deetroy Ship. "It Is a proper and justifiable practice for belligerents to destroy enemy ships wnicn are i fV bffeuS jf V-'t' sjt I -v A vv ifz A--. .5. i-, J.g IrV 5 -tr a had visited in Milton.

Will Stiffen British Resistance. Albert F. Flint, president of the British Uhaytable Society, expressed the opinion that the sinking of the Lusitanta will result in the hastening of the end of the war. "It will strengthen the British people to carry the war through to the end Dr Rudolf Hutz, president of the Boston German Society, said: "I am ex ceedingly sorry that German has been forced by English proocation to set this example. "i hope that England will now admit effectiveness of the German sub marine blockade that so far the people of that countiy have charade: ized as a "bluff, and that tiie sinking of the Lusitania will induce them to cease their lhegal long-distance blockade of Germany and allow legitimate trade to continue.

Adolph Krebs, a well-known German of 2t Poitland st. iambrulge, said" Every sane and decent man, no matter what nlood flows in his veins, regrets the loss of life consequent on the flaking of the great ship. Eight mil FIRST CABIN. Reported as Saved: BERVARD, OLIVER formerly of 38 Winchester st, Brookline. DAWSON, ALTER, Congress st, Lowell.

FIFE, MRS JAMES; had risited relatives in Holyoke. LAURIAT, CHARLES E. JR, 31 Linnaean st, Cambridge. POPE, MISS THEOPATE, Farmington, Conn. WALLACE, CYRIL 61 Lamb st, Holyoke.

WOLFENDEY, MRS JOHN Pawtncket, I. Not Heard From: 4DAMS, A. HENRY; had visited parents at 108 Hnnnewell av, Newton. ADAMS, WILLIAM McMILLAN; son of above. BRODRICK, CARLTON 56 Bowdoin st, Newton Highlands.

BROOKS, J. IL, Bridgeport, Conn. BURKE, ERNEST 54! Pine st. Central Falls, I. HARRIG AN, PETER, Providence.

DEWHURST, WILLIAN, 156 Buffington st, Fall River. FREEMAN, RICHARD R. JR, 40 Grand View av, Wollaston. FRIEND, PROF EDWIN Farmington, Conn, formerly of Boston. HANSON, MR AND MRS SAMUEL, 101 Washington st, Central Falls, I.

HIGGINBOTTOM, MISS MARY, Franklin st. Fall River. LOYETT, MISS MARY, 694 3d st. Fall River. LEIGH, EVAX A 232 Sommer st, Boston.

LUCK, MRS A. C. and sons, ELDREDGE and KENNETH; Mr Luck works for a Worcester firm. MASON, MR AND MRS STEWART S. (Leslie H.

Lindsey), Boston. MOON, EDWIN, 722 Pine st. Central Falls, I. FAGE J. HARVEY, vice president of Mark Cross Company and native of Boston.

PEARSON, DR FRED Stockbridge and London. SECCOUBE, MISS ELIZABETH, Concord, Mass, and Peterboro, H. SECCOMBE, PERCY, Concord, Mass, and Peterboro, If. STEVENSON, -MISS RUTH, Holyoke. TRUMBULL, ISAAC 440 Mill Hill av, Bridgeport, Conn.

WITHINGTON, LOTH HOP, New bnryport. WOLFENDEN, JOHN 624 Dexter st, Pawtucket. I. WOODCOCK, MISS SARAH 96 Oak Grove av, Fail River. and more than 100 lives have been sa-crlfled.

makes me sad. and I sympathize with the families ot those who lost their "The note of Sec Bryan. In which he stated that he would hold the German 1 "vvas Gernlnnv i Government to strict accountability for Lusitanm stifled in sinking the the destruction of the Uvea and property 8hip of thp Rdh" v3 ere of American citizens referred to threat- serve vessels a Dart Zt ened attacks upon United States ves- Uishvlvy; "JSSSsfWU tsxixsxesa imrS It as Vyjf 'S- i jfti Lf 4 irM yfM, fiKf LUSITANIA STOKER LAID OFF THIS TRIP Says Fire Crew Probably Died in Trap. Grew Drills Show That It Took 15 Minutes to Launch a Boat. Morgan Ross, formerly of Holyoke, not yet 21 years old, butwith nearly two years of sea service, part of it as a stoker on the Lusitania, Is glad now that he took the advice of a friend a couple of months ago and took a layoff from the work.

If the ship was torpedoed at night, he said yesterday at the Globe office, the loss of life would have been greater. Scores of the men in the firing force would have been drowned. There are three watches and each one contains about 90 men. They work four hours and lajoff eight. "Where they sleep a narrow passage leads to the upper decks They have to go up three decks to get life belts, for none are below, because they are so bulky that the men would find difficulty in getting to the deck with them.

I was on the Lusitania on its trip when she flew the American flag going into Liverpool. Many of the men below felt that she would get caught some day, even though she was very speedv. "When we reached Fastnet we were all anxious, and it was the same until we left that place on the return trip. Some of the men would go up on the deck aft and sleep there instead of being down below. They were not what you would call afraid, but rather nervous.

Never Saw Convoys. "When I was on the Lusitania I never saw anv convoys for her. And on the other ships I did not see any but once, and that was at night when we saw some lights away off on the horizon signaling it was all right "On the Lusitania w'e had boat drill at Liverpool and at New York the dav before we 3ailed It took an hour to go Through all the drills, which Included file and collisions The boat drill meant slinging out the boats, hut new men in the crew were aw kward getting off the lashings. "With the collapsible boats, one inside another and one set of davits, it meant dropping one boat over and then swing, ing the hooks back for others. That i probably accounts for the big loss of1 Ute.

it took us a good 15 minutes to clear away one boat drill. "On the St Pain, the American Liner, the crew expected that she would be torpedoed on any voyage and when the danger zone was reachid the men put on lifebelts and slept on deck. They vveie not trusting to our flag for pro-te tion. Thought Yankees Favored Germany. "Later I was on the Baltic, and the straitge thing to me was that many of the crew of Knglishmen had an idea that Americans favored Germany against the Allies.

One night we bumped into something outside New York and some of the crew said that it was a German steamer flving an American flag that tried to rant us. "On the Lusitania some of the bulkhead doors were near the coal bunkers, and by the time the ship reached the other side the coal was well down, and so w-hen the watertight doors are closed from the bridge there may have been sweepings of coal there that would prevent its closing absolutely "As the reports sav that the torpedo hit that part of the vessel, it is probable that all the fireroom fotce on duty were trapped, for the orders are to remain at the fires until the water reaches the level of the doors. So if they wanted to get away they would be kept there anjwav by the enginering force, who would hold them back, as there were onlv small places to climb up on both sides "But the men were probably killed by the explosion in the first instance, and the hot coals scattered about creating gas that quickly suffocates anvone. In the Lusitanias crew when I was on her were only two Americans, ard whetner they weie on her now I cannot say. DELAYED BY PASSPORT.

Relative of Fall River Man Was to Sail on Lusitania No Word of Residents. FALL RIVER, May 8 No word has been received of the fate of the four Fall Riv er passengers on board the Lusitania. Tonight Cornelius ONeil of 69 Tecura-seh st said that Mr and Mrs John COughlin of Butte, Mont, the latter his sister, who had been visiting him since April 13, wth their three children And sailed to make their permanent home in Ireland, were well-known In Boston and Haverhill. James Coughlin, a brother-in-law who came here from the West with' bis sister and her husband, also intended to sail on the Lusitania, but delay in obtaining a passport forced him to remain here until he secured passage on an American Line steamship which sailed jesterdav. Mary Higginbotham, a Fall River passenger on the Lusitania, was a waitress here.

She was returning to her old home in Lancashter, England, to see her mother, who is ill. William Dewhurst. a young Englishman, was returning to his old home In DarwtAf' He had been a weaver in one of the Iron Works mills. His refusal to do noon hour work brought about his discharge two weeks ago and, being in rather poor health, he did not seek other employment Dewhurst boarded with Mrs Sarah Grimshaw, 156 Bradford av He was Iff ears old. Miss Sarah Woodcock of 96 Oak Grove av had been on an extended visit to her sister.

Miss Eliza J. Woodcock. She was accompanied as far as Neva York her cister, who has not yet returned to this city. Miss Mary Lovatt of 64? 3d st waa on a pleasure trip to her brother's home in Manchester, Eng. She had not seen him in gears.

11 Something Believed to Be Radically Wrong, WASHINGTON. Mav Amert-tn Naval officers are rapidlv losing respect for the administiation of the Bntlsij Admiralty. In conversing with indivtdn als during the last few weeks. known officers have fieel.v Great Britains failure to use her Na more effectively. Todav oftners marveled at the Adniiraltvs failure to pro-tect the Lusitania so it would hav been impossible for the German sub.

marine to send her to the bottom "Winstan Churchill, Fust Lord of the British Admiralty, la not to he envied his position today. a ranking officer ot the Navy said this afternoon I would not like to be in ins hoots and feel thti a Naval policy tor whico I aa responm-ble had been partiallv to blame lor the destruction of the Lusitania with the terrible toll of lives I fear that the Knglish people mar demand a new head of (he Admiralty before many houis pass, because fiom todays dispatches it ippeats that the are rapidly 1 beginning to realne that something is radlrallv wrong with the Naval administration "Forty-eight hours ago we were all quite satisfied that the Lusitania would be escorted Into port bv a Urge flet of torpedo destroyers who would have been capable of protecting het from the whole division of submarines I wa perfectly astounded to find that sh wai given no protection whatever Will Dispose of Speed Theory. "There is a theory in the Britsh Ad. mlralty that the best defense againit submarine attack is speed. That theory will probably be disposed of withuut loss of time, as a result of the torpedo-ing of the Lusitania.

The belief ap. peared to prevail in lamdon that it would be Impossible to destrov a ship of the Lusitania's strength and speed hr torpedo, because siie would he expected to outdistance her pursuers. "It appears never to have or curved the British Admiralty that the wim Germans would use precisely the tactics that appear to have been emploved In this case that is. they would place sub-marines on her course and lie in wait for her. "Of course, in a case of this sort of' attack the question ot speed never entered the equation.

Thete were un-, doubtedly a score or moie submarines which had nothing to do hut wait for! the Lusitania, and when she hove Into, sight one or more of them had a rela-1 tlvely easy time getting close enough to send her to the bottom Destroyers Guarding Transports. Knowing that German) was Ijing in wait for all the British shipping that passed through those wateis, one wmuld assume that the Admiralty would make some attempt to drive them away. At a matter of fact, it appears that virtually all of Great Britain's destrojers have been assigned protect the transports which are taking troops trom England to France. It will be remembered that sine the first British expeditionary force was shipped to France, the German sub-marines have failed in their efforts to send any of the transports to the bottom. There Is every reason to believe that they have attempted to the troop ship and have been unable to pierce the line of destioyers piotecting the transports.

"To my mind, however, the greatest error being made by the British Admiralty la their failure to concentrate all of the second and third-class vesseli they have in commission instead of scattering them over the seven seas. Patrolling African Coast. For example there ts a line of British ships petroling the coast of Africa, blockading Germany colonies It seems to, me to be of infinitely more importance that these ships should be concentrated in British waters or on the trade routes where they would be capable of protecting British merchantmen the reason for which the British Navy Is supposed to have been built. "But more unfathomable still from the Naval standpoint is the fact that Great Britain has a good sized fleet cf vessels scattered along the coast of this country and South America looking for German shipping. "I should think it would be quite evident to the British Admiralty that it will be impossible for any of the German ships, now in American ports to make a getaway in such a manner that would cause disturbance to British ship- "It would be impossible for any of these vessels to get out of port carrying guns In position, and it is highly improbable that they would care to attempt to cross the Atlantic for commerce purposes only.

If any of them attempted to return to Germany, it would be quite easy for some of the British ships which are lying off Germany to pick them up and dispose of them without difficulty. British Navy Outwitted. "As far as strategy goes, Germany has completely outwitted Great Britain on the sea. Considering the number of vessels fljing the British flag. should be a relatively easy matter for them to completely cripple the German Naval organization.

"When you add to Gieat Britain Navy that of France, which Is suppod to ba a great as that of the (Tilted fctatea, it become extremely difficult to account for Britain's failure to rule tn waves. DIFFICULT SITUATION, Ex-President Taft Confident That Mr Wilson Will Follow a Wise and Patriotic Course. MILWAUKEE, Wis, May Th news of the sinking of the Lusitania it come thi morning most distressing." said Ex-President Taft on his ar rival here today from Madison. It presents a situation of the most difficult character, properly awakening great National concern. I do not wisn to embarrass the President or the Administration by a discussion of the subject at this stage of the Information.

1 am confident the President will follow a wise and patriotic course NEW ENGLANDERS SAVED. Boston Cunard Office Gives Out List of Third Class Passengers on th Lusitania. The local office of the Cunard Steamship Company last nigrht gave out the following list of third-class passenger on 'the Lusitania known to have bee rescued Msrgaret Ballanttne Steel Fred Bottomly George Slovens Waiter Damson Iman Taracsem ie Thomaa Dbenin Mr A Mr George War Mrs A Elizabeth Dug- Edith Williams Robert Woodworth Mr A Mrs Charles fills Harrison IMr Powell Mallei Stephens Alfred Stoctcr Bab Yukob 9 Grinsted Th Bile faafig (Edward MmiMen Stachula, given Thomaa Snomden "Stenelite" I Amite Sharp ONLY 60 BAGS OF MAIL ON LUSITANIA LONDON. May The Posmaster General announces that only 60 bags of mail had been dispatched bv the Lusitania, the bulk of th American mLi having gone bjr the liner NTew tor GARDNER, Toronto. GARDNER.

WILLIAM, Toronto. GHIBERDOT, HERBERT. GRAY, R. Los Angeles GRIFFITHS, C. Pittsburg.

GWYER, Rev H. Saskatoon, Can. GWYER, Mrs H. Saskatoon, Can. HALDANE JAMES.

New York. HALE, R. HAMPSHIRE, MISS ELIZABETH E. Boston. HARDY.

MISS New York. HARRIS, Montreal. HENDERSON, MASTER HUNTLEY Montreal. HENDERSON. VIOLA.

Montreal. I1ENSHAW. MRS Saskatoon. Can. HERTZ, DOUGLAS C.

HILL, WILLIAM SPENCER. HOGG, MRS ELLEN, New York. HOLBORN, I. B. 8, Yonkers, Y.

HOLLAND, MRS H. New York. HOSKINS, Montreal. HOUSNELL, EDGAR, New York. INCH, W.

E. JACKSON, I. JONES. WILLIAM G. JUDSON, FRED S.

KAYE. MISS CATHERINE. LANE. G. B.

LAUDER. E. LEWIS, Mr and Mrs JOHN, and child. LINES, STANLEY B. LINES, MRS STANLEY LOHDEN, MRS R.

LOHDEN. MISS ELSIE. LUCAS, FRANCIS J. LUND, MRS C. Chicago.

MANBY. Miss ADA. MARICHAL Mrs J. and three chil dren. MARSHALL, Mrs FANNY.

McCOLIN, Mrs CHRISTINE. McCOLIN, MRS JAMES Ottawa. McDONNELL, Miss KITTY. McFADYEN, H. McFARQUHAR, Mrs J.

A. McFARQUHAR, Miss GRACE. McKENZIE. R. A.

McLELLlN. MISS SARAH. MAINMAN, EDWIN. MAINMAN, MAINMAN, 'MISS MOLLY. MARICHAL, J.

P- MARICHAL, MASTER MAURICE. MAYCOCK. MISS MAY. MAYER, H. T.

MAYER, MRS H. T. MARICHAL, Miss PHYILL. MARICHAL, Miss YVONNE. MARUN, Mrs R.

MAYCOCK. Miss MAY. MERHEINA, Mr UNO. MEYER, Mr and Mrs H. P.

MICHAEL. DAVID. MIDDLEMAST, Mrs E. Regina, Can. MILFORD, FREDERICK J.

MITCHELL, A. MOODY, META. MOORE, D. Yankton, So. Dak.

MOORE? JOHN, Manchester, Conn. MORRIS? Rev H. C. S. MURDOCK.

Miss JESSIE, MURRAY, Mrs C. MYERS, W. G. ELLASON. NEEDHAM, HENRY E.

NEGRIS, EDWARD. NORTH, MISS OLIVE. O'DONNELL, PATRICK. PAGE. ANDREW.

PEACOCK, EDWARD. PEACOCK. Miss E. F. PLANK, Mrs H.

or DAVEY. READDIE, J. R. RICHARDS. THOMAS H.

RICHARDS, Mrs THOMAS and two children. SANDELLES, THOMAS. SCOTT, GEORGE. SCRIMGOUR, WILLIAM. SECCHI, HERBERT.

SIMPSON. Rev H. W. SMITH, MISS ELLEN. SMITH, J.

PRESTON. SORENSON. STONE. NORMAN. SWEENEY, JOHN M.

SWEET, F. H. TARRY, EDWARD. TAYLOR, MRS A. i TIJON, MRS W.

E. TORPIN, THOMAS K. TURPIN. MRS MAUD (T. WEBB, MISS MINNIE.

WEBSTER, MASTER FREDERICK. WEBSTER, MRS F. G. WEBSTER, MASTER HENRY. WEBSTER.

MASTER WILLIAM. WH ALLEY, ROBERT WHITCOMB, HUGO. WILDE, MISS AGNES WILDE, MISS EVELYN. WILLIAM, ROBERT. WILSON, MRS PATRICK.

WINTER, Miss T. WOODWORTH, MISS RUTH WORDSWORTH, OSMOND-BARTLE. WYATH, MRS M. A. SECOND AND THIRD CABIN.

ASHMAN, HENRY C. BaRROW, D. G. BARLEY, GEORGE BENJAMIN. Miss QUEEXIK.

BOYLE. JAMES. BROWN, WILLI AM? COLEMAN, Mrs SUSAN, CROSBY. AGNES. DIAMANDIES, THEODORE.

DAWSON. W. ELLISON, BABAJAN. FARROW, ROBERT. FKANKUMN, JOSEPH, and child, FRANCIS.

GALLAGHER, Mrs MARGARET. GLANCY, JOSEPH. GOODWIN, ROSE. GRANAHAN. MICHAEL.

HANLEY. PETER. 1LASKETH, ALFRED. HOOK, GEORGE. HOOK, FfANK.

ICAHRAMAAM. PETROSIAN. KILKENNY, DELIA M. -LEE, BRIDGET. MARSH, Mrs.

MATTHEWS, THOMAS. McCLINTOCK. Miss. MoGIXLEY, PATRICK. McSWEENEY, JOHN.

MOSES. JANET. NEILSON, Miss VICTORIA. PARKES, WILLIAM H. RILEY.

Mr and Mrs EDWARD, and two children. ROWAN, ANNIE. SCOTT, ARTHUR. SCOTT. ALICE.

EDWARD. SMETHURSE. Mr and Mrs. SHAIKELL. WILLIAM.

SMITH, GEORGE IEPHENS, THOMAS C. THOMPSON, JOSEPH. TAYLOR, Mr and Mrs M. W. WILKES.

KATE. WOODWARD, ROBERT. UNCLASSIFIED. BARTLETT, OLIVER. I I JNew York.

ALLAN, Lady, of Montreal. ALLES, N. of New York. AYALA, JULIAN de (Cuban Consul General at Liverpool). BAKER, JAMES, 'of England.

BARTLETT. G. London. BARTLETT, MRS G. London.

BATTERSBY, J. Stockport, Eng. BERNARD. CLINTON New York. BERNARD, OLIVER, Boston.

BOHAN. JAMES, Toronto. BOULTON, Jr, Chicago. BOWRING, CHARLES New York. BRAITH WAITE.

MISS DOROTHY, Morristown, 5. BRANDELL, MISS JOSEPHINE. New tfork. BROOKS, J. New York.

BURGESS, HENRY New York. BURNSIDE, MRS J. 8.. New York. BUSWELL, PETER (CAMERONIA), New York.

BYINGTON, A. London. BYRNE, M. New York. CHARLES, DORIS.

Toronto. CHARLES, J. Toronto. CLARKE, A. Toronto.

CLARKE, REV COWLEY, London. COLEBROOK, H. Toronto. CONNER. MISS DOROTHY, New York.

CROSS, A. B. DALY, H. M. FISHER, DR HOWARD New York.

GAUNTLETT, FRED. New York. GRAD, OSCAR New York. HAMMOND, C. New York.

HAMMOND. MRS. HARDWICK. C. New York.

HARRIS. DWIGHT New York. HILL, MRS C. London. HODGES, DEAN Philadelphia.

HOLT. W. Montreal. HOME, THOMAS, Toronto. HOOK, FRANK.

HOUGHTON, DR J. New York. JEFFERY, CHARLES Chicago. HENKEN, FRANCIS. JENKINS, FRANCIS BERTRAM, Chicago.

JO LI VET, MISS RITA, Chicago. KEEBLE, Toronto. KEEBLE, MRS Toronto. KEMPSON, Toronto. -KENAN, DR OWEN.

New York. KESSLER, GEORGE New York. KNOX, Philadelphia. LASETTER, London. LASETTER, MRS H.

London. LAURIAT, CHARLES E. JR, Boston. LEAROYD, MRS C. A.

(and maid), Sydney. LEARY. JAMES New York. LEHMANN. ISAAC, Liverpool.

LEHMANN. DYLAND, Liverpool. LEHMANN, MARTIN, Liverpool. LEVINSON, JOSEPH JR, Liverpool. LEWIN, F.

GUY, New York. LOBB, MRS POPHAM, New York. LOCKHART, Toronto. LONEY, New York. LONEY, MRS, New York.

McConnell, john Memphis. MAC WORTH, LADY, Cardiff. McMURRAY, L. Toronto. MATHEWS, A.

Montreal. MOSLEY. G. New York. ORR-LEWIS, Toronto.

OSBORNE, MRS A. B. (Irene), Hamilton. PADLEY, MRS F. (Charles), Liverpool.

PAPPADOPOULO, M. Greece. PAPPADOPOULO, MRS M. Greece. PARTRIDGE, FRANK, New York.

PAINTER, CHARLES Liverpool. PAYNTER. MISS IRENE, Liverpool. PEARL, MAJ F. WARREN, New York.

PEARL, MRS F. WARREN, and two children. New York. PEARL, STUART DUNCAN, New York. PERRY, FREDERICK, Buffalo.

PHILLIPS, WALLACE New York. PIERPOINT. WILLIAM Liverpool. PIRIE, ROBINSON. Hamilton.

POPE, MISS THEDOATE, Farming-ton, Conn. POSEN, Farmington, Conn. RANKIN, ROBERT, New York. RATCLIFF, N. New York.

RHYS-EVANS, A. Cardiff. ROGERS, PERCY Toronto. SLIDELL, THOMAS, New York. SMITH, MISS JESSIE TAFT, Brace-ville, O.

STURDY, C. Montreal. TAYLOR, RICHARD LIONEL. Montreal. THOMAS, D.

Cardiff. THOMPSON, MRS E. BLISH, Indiana. THOMPSON, E. BLISH, Indiana.

TIMMIS. R. New York. TOOTAL, F. E.

London. TOWNLEY, ERNEST, Toronto. TURTON, G. Melbourne. VASSAR.

Vi. A. London. WITHERBEE, MRS A. New York.

WRIGHT. ROBERT Cleveland. YOUNG, PHILIP. Montreal. SURVIVORS OF SECOND CABIN.

ABRAMOWITZ, New York. ADAMS, MRS A. Edmonton, Can. ADAMS, MISS JOAN Edmonton, Can. AITKEN, MISS C.

ALLEN. JOHN. BANNETT. MISS MAY. BARRIE, ED W4KD, New York.

BARTLETT, JOHN. BIRCHALL, HENRY. Roslyn, Washn. BEATTIE, MRS JAMES New York. BOOTH, infant (probably child of Mrs H.

Booth) Ottawa. BRAMMER, MRS E. Trenton. J. BRAMMER, MISS Trenton, J.

BRETHERTON, MRS, child and infant. Los Angeles. BR1LLY, LOUIS, Los Angeles. BROWN. DAN Los Angeles.

BROWNLEY. MRS THOMAS. BRYCE, H. Syracuse, Y. BRYCE, MRS H.

Syracuse, Y. CAMPBELL, ANNA MENA, New York. CAMPBELL, or MRS. Chicago. CANDLISH, MRS ARTHUR, Boston.

CANDLISH, ARTHUR, Boston. CHAMBERS, GUY. COKBURN, GUY R. COLLIS, EDWIN Chicago. COWPER.

ERNEST, Toronto. CROSSLEY, CYRUS, Toronto. CROSSLEY. MRS CYRUS, Toronto. DALRYMPLE, DAVID.

DODD, MISS DOROTHY. Edmonton. Can. DOHERTY, Mrs and infant. DOLPHIN, Miss EVA, St Thomas, Ont.

DONALD, Boston. DUGUID. GEORGE. Pittsburg. DYER.

ROBERT, Pittsburg. EDGAR, H. EGANA. VINCENTE. New York.

ELLIOTT, Mrs A. Calgary, Can. ELLIS, JOHN, Edmonton. Can. EWART, ROBERT Brooklyn, Y.

FISH. Miss MARION. Toronto. FISH, Mrs S. and two children Toronto.

SECOND CABIN. Reported as Saved: ANDERSON, MRS R. and daughter BARBARA, Bridgeport, Conn. CANDLISII, MRS ARTHUR, Pawtucket, I. CHAMBERS, GUY, East Braintree.

DONALD, ARCHIBALD 11 Everett st, Cambridge. WPSHIRE. MISS ELIZABETH HALDAME, JAMES IL, Quincy, on list as AV. R. Haldame.

McFARQUHAR, MRS JANE and daughter GRACE, Stratford, Conn. SULLIVAN, MRS F. 367 Main st, Charlestown. TAYLOR, MRS 4Yet Roxbury. WHITEHEAD, MISS FLORENCE, had xisited in Milton.

4VHYATT, AIRS MARTHA, 47 Fruit st. New Bedford. WILSON, JOHN, 11 Eierett st, Cambridge. Not Heard From: ABAS, MRS and two children, Brookline. CAMPBELL, Marlboro st, Boslonc CANDLISII, ARTHUR.

Pawtueket, I. CHAMBERS, MRS GUY East Braintree. CHARLES, MISS Boston. DONAIIUE, MISS SABAH, 41 Charles st, Dorchester. FEN TION AN, MISS Manchester, Mass.

FINCH, MRS EYA E4 5G Johnson st, Lynn. GRFENAVOOD, MASTER RONALD, aged 11, 92 Emerson st. South Boston. HOPKINS, -AIISS ALICE, Boston. KENNEY, AIRS AIARGAKET and danghter ALARY, 41A Park st, Charles-town.

McKENZIE, AIARY Dartmouth st. New Bedford. MOORE, JOHN, Manchester, Conn. PAYNE, MARTIN 20 AVestford st, Springfield. SALT, II.

Needham. SULLIVAN, F. 367 Main st, Charlestown. SUMNER, THOMAS, Quincy. TAFT, SIDNEY, 332 Hillside aT, Needham Heights.

THURSTON, JOHN, Bridgeport, Conn. WORDEN, AIRS CHARLES 137 Riverside st, LowcE. lions Tn money, which the ship cost band of war. bound for England. A fair w-arning was published, indicating the glsK that passengers assumed when they sailed on this boat.

We know- the Where Were the British Ships? "But what amazes me the absence of tho English warships here are the English ships? Why weie thev not on tho lookout to protect this magnificent vessel, with its 2000 lives aboard the English afraid to come out 18 hlnglish braverv a myth. It would seem to me that with the warning the English had legaiding tho Lusitania there should have been on hand some of their stoutest and swiftest cruisers to protect her It appears as li. I abandoned the ship, thinking tnat Germany never meant to earn out Its program of making war on her 'com-ripht under its own shores. English bluff and blistei dotsn't 2:0 hen G(i rm any savs it will do a thing, you can make up your mmd that it wili be done, if it can be done. Germany will not he moved from patKh fduiy to 1,8 People and its cause by silly denunciation of its act as Piracy and all that sort of thing.

"ar is Pot. child's pl PFland Is the last Nation in the wor that is justified in calling other nations hard names and charging them with unnecessary eiuelties in war She has been guilty of all soits of atrocities herself and is past master of tho arVn iandcring her sister Nations when she believes it will help her cause to do so When this war is over and the story of it is written by lnfcpartial pens, it wU be found tiiat England and her Allies haven any corner on maena-n amity. "Should America interfere? I see no reason for it. Those who travel on a belligerent ship in time of war take chances They do so with their evfes wide open I imagine that if the boot was on the other leg the British tune would be different. Now there is a loud demand on the part of the English for the United States to btep in and assert itself Germany has done nothing contrary to well-established principles of intei national law and waifare.

Warning Deemed No Justification. One authority on international law, who does not wish his name used, said: "We are not in a position to understand the international aspect of this thing because we huvent the facts yet We dont know for a certainty that the Lusitania was toipedoed bv a German submarine. is possible, of course, that she was blown up from the inside. But 1 think there is one thing that should be made clear if it Is found that the Lusitania was torpedoed and that is that the published warning of tiie German Embassy does not relieve Germany of responsibility any more tnan a man would be relieved of responsibility for setting fire to my house after he had warned me he was going to do it. REQUIEM SERVICE FRIDAY.

Consuls of Allied Nations Invited to Church of the Advent, Where Rev Dr van Allen Will Preach. Rev William II. var Allen has invited the consuls of the allied Rations to at'-y tend a requiem service for the victims of the Lusitania in the Church of the Advent next Friday morning at 10-30. Kev John Higginson Cabot will be the celebrant and lr van Allen will penen a sermon in wnteh he wilt deal vigorously with the circumstances of the tragedy and the war i LITTLE BOSTON MAIL Lusitania Carried Only Two Pouches of Specially Marked Letters From This City. Yerv little mail left the Boston Post- on the Lusitania, the regular mail fr Kurope going on the same day on boani tiie steamer New Yoik.

flying the American flug Only two pouches of letter mall and no patters or packages from here went on the Lusitania. The mail was specially addressed, the sender marking on the envelope that it was to by the Lusitania. sels. "The fact that under the conditions of this modern war the vessels sunk are deatroved by aubmarines introduces a now question as to the responsibility for the lives of neutral citizens which may thereby be sacrificed. "Hitherto, the practice has been, so far as I for the ship destroying the prize to save those on hoard.

Such action may be an impossibility under modern conditions It is a doubtful question to be determined Judicially and not a casus belli or ground for declaration of war. Prof Albert Bushnell Hart. Prof Albert Bushnell Halt of Harvard University says. "If it Is proven that the sinking of the Lusitania was caused by an infernal machine It will be exceedingly difficult to bring the matter home to the German authorities or to any one on this aide of the water. "If the vessel waa torpedoed It was undoubtedly done by the German authorities, as England doesnt sink her own ships, and since the German Government gave out a warning to the passengers It cannot escape the responsibility under the clroumetances.

"If the vessel waa torpedoed and the German Government refuses the responsibility It Is for the United States fo decide when and bow it will enforce that responsibility. "How far the United States will go In the matter depends entirely upon the Government, and at this time no one can aay what shall be done. You may be certain, however, that patriotic people will etand by the Administration. Any further destruction of American lives or American ships on the high boss cannot be reasonably considered anything hut a hostile act to the United States. Gov Walsh8 View.

Gov VVals. issued the following statement: "I am not sufficiently expert in International law to venture an opinion as to whether ftiis terrible act can or can not be Justified on the plea of military necessity Moreover. In this, as is other international matters. I believe it to be the duty ot State officials and private citizens generally to refrain from embarrassing the President and ins advisors by hasty and hot-headed com-ment- "Prestdent Wilson has abundantly earned the right to be trusted in the management of our foieign affairs, and 1 consider that his request that all good eltizens observe a genuine neutrality applies to crises like the present even more, possibly, than to less exciting times. I trust that all citizens of Massachusetts will now realize that the perils of ocean travel under war conditions aie not to be lightly regarded, and I hope that not-Vng short of actual business necessity will hereafter tempt any of them to risk their own lives and the Nations peace and prosperity by a rash exposure to risks so terrible.

Only Profanity Adequate. E. Sumner Mansfield. Belgian consul Boston, said that in his position he could not discuss the matter in its internation bearings, "But as a man, he said, "I cant add anything but profanity to what the papers have already eaid editorially on the matter." Prof Leo Wiener of Harvard was outspoken In his condemnatuvi of the sinking of the Lusitania He gaid: "I hope ths United States wdil immediately sever mil connections with GeriAinv "There remains only oij more act of savagery for the GermarB to perform and that is cannibalism! I have no doubt even this will coma yet. This deed is terrible awful.

This act reallv needs no comment from any one. It stands alone tn the world's history, and condemns itself mors than all the criticism possible. Hon Samuel J. Elder said. 'Of course I do not know what action the Washington authorities will take.

Heretofore the nitrchant and passenger els belong. tug to a belligerent were subject to capl ture. and under stern necessuy to de- i struction, providing the lives of those on board were seemed "Merchznt ships snd private propertv and the lives of noncomhatanrs and neutrals ought to be Just as secure on sea as on land. "JA'lut tie United. Utew1iL'dftj THIRD CLASS.

Reported as Saved: SHARP, ANNIE, serrant for Bryce Allan, Boston. KILKENNY, DELIA, servant for Prof Peabody in Cambridge. SIMPSON, EDAVAED, 158 Exchange st, Lawrence. SNOAVDEN, EDAAARD, 20 Ridgeway st, Lynn. Probably Thomas Snowden.

Not Heard From: ANDERSON, CAROLINE, 12 Pierce st, Malden. BYRNES, NELLIE 125 Centre st, Roxbnry. CARRIGAN, MARGARET, employed at 128 Chestnut st, AVest Newtom COOPER, NELLIE, and child. New Bedford. CORRIGAN, PETEK, toary st.

Providence. DRISCOLL, TIMOTHY', 72 Tyler st, Boston. HURLEY, CHARLES 118 Battle st, Brockton. KELLY, MARY, Boston. McCOBMICK, JOHN, Nashua, AIcDERAIOTT, ANDREW, Salem.

1 MURRAY, MARY, Boston- RILEY, MR and MRS EDAVARD and twin children, 10 Camden st, Metboen. STENSON, DELIA, 92 Mt Pleasant av, Roxbnry. THOMPSON, MR and AIRS JOSEPH, and son, NORMAN, 150 Neponset st, Canton. TOBIN, NORA, Boston. AA'EBB, AATLLIAM, and family, 85 Newbury ar, Medford.

WAABAXEN, JELLI, mail for Ex-Mayor James Logan Worcester,.

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