The Boston Globe from Boston, Massachusetts on November 1, 1923 · 7
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Boston Globe from Boston, Massachusetts · 7

Publication:
Location:
Boston, Massachusetts
Issue Date:
Thursday, November 1, 1923
Page:
7
Start Free Trial
Cancel

THE BOSTON GLOBE THUKSD AY, NOVEMBER 1, 1923 Kennedy'sThe Live Star, " I m rf. Other Stores Here's the only store in town that deals exclusively in the very choicest qualities of men's wear on a strictly cash basis. The savings to our customers are both appreciable and appreciated. And here's the only store that offers great quantities and wide varieties of the highest grade clothing that the markets of the world afford the only store to achieve a volume business on that class of merchandise. Volume cuts expenses and lowers prices. No store sells better clothes, nor as good ones as low, nor will do more to have and to hold you as a satisfied customer. Suits and O'coats $ 25 up to $ 90 The Kuppenheimer Line starts at $35 Open Saturday Evenings Kennedy's New England's Largest, Livest, Leading Men's Store Summer and Hawley Streets LITTLE MARTHA JOHNSON WINS FLIV IN WINTHROP WINTHROP. Nov 1 Little Martha B. Johnson, 6-vear-old. of 82 Temple av, Winthrnn HitriiLinfis hart reason to re joice today. Mme Fortune smiled upon her during the night and dropped into her -'lap" a brand new flivver of the latest closed type, and naturally' her Mule heart thumped with Joy. Father T . . .... )... nfRfa in KflKtOn because Martha insisted on a ride round the town before school. the show, "Sally, Irene and Mary, had no small part in bringing all this happiness to the tot. She was the guest of honor at the annual Halloween party in the Winthrop Arms .of hte Winthrop Highlands Association and drew the lucky number that, sent the machine rolling into the child's arms. The occasion, styled a "Witches' Rev- Fine Mirror Clocks The Mirror Clock illustrated, height 3 ft., width 2 ft, gilded frame, Waltham 8-day movement, 9xl5-in. gilded dial. A fine reproduction of a Colonial antique, the price $70 Other Waltham Mirror Clocks $45 to $95 el," was all that the name implied, and attracted a brilliant display of cos tumes in which strutted ghosts, shieks and other characters too innumerable to mention. The decorations added the finishing touches to the scene. Prizes for the most original makeups were awarded to the Misses Ruth and Yvonne Waldron, G. Wallaces Tibbetts. president of the Kxchange Trust Company of Boston; Herbert N. Clough and Willard N. Haft. These were selected (Turing the "parade of Nations" by Miss Brown, Kitty Donher of "The Dancing Girl" and Harrison Broadbank of "Caroline." Other theatrical stars present were J. Harolrt Murray, leading man of "Caroline," formerly a Winthrop boy, and Miss Rose Dpnner. Musical numbers by the Filene Trio, comprising the Misses Catherine Barrv, Christine Robinson and Helen Drlscol'l, were warmly, received. Malcolm K. Crowley, chairman, was assisted by Pres Clarence Bissell and a hustling committee. The proceeds will be sued to purchase land for the association's tennis courts. smithatterscm Q. Summer St-at Arch & Chauncy Sts. DIAMOND MERCHANTS AND JEWELERS assisiESSiiaiQoisiiEssaiii 10,000 IMMIGRANTS SWAMP ELLIS ISLAND NEW YORK, Nov 1-Ellls Island was swamped today with 10,000 Immigrants brought in under the November quota early today on eight trans-Atlantic lin ers. Government officials said the yearly quotas of several Nations would be exhausted before the day was done. The Greek liner Byron, which for 24 hours had been anchored off Ambrose Iight awaiting the official arrival of Nov 1, was the first vessel Into Quarantine, arriving at 12:03. There followed In succession President Arthur, the Columbia, the Suffren and Patrla from French ports, the Fort Victoria from Bermuda, the Cunarder Albania and the Vollendam from Holland. The Cleveland, making her first trip here from Hamburg, was expected late today. The Majestic will come In tomorrow with many Irish and Scotch immigrants. The Columbia had 8S9 immigrants, most of them from Scotland. More than 300 men aboard were shipyard artisans, forced from the Clyde yards by unemployment. , ta . .,.. 5000 IMMIGRANTS REACH PORT TODAY Italian SS Martha Washington First In Group of Brides-Elect on Megantic (EhanDler $c 4to TREMONT STREET. NEAR WEST Bringing upward of 5000 immigrants, four big liners reached port this morning from European ports. More than 30 nationalities were represented in the great throngs of aliens seeking admission to this country. First to arrive was the Italian steamship Martha Washington, Capt Aristide Cosulich, from Trieste, Patras, NapleB, Algiers and Almeria, with 861 passengers, of whom 43 were first cabin, 252 second class and 6B6 third class. The Washington was the first to be examined by the port physician, and she arrived at Commonwealth Pier at 9 a m. The officers reported rather boisterous weather in crossing. One of the mess boys, Giulio de Mal-Hg, 17, was in the ship's brig for stealing $150 from Miss Walburga Lizzoll and $21 from another passenger. The money was recovered. Three Italian stowaways. "Vincenzo de Rosa, 27; Pasquale Castellano, 18, and Ermanno Fukenrleder, 28, were turned over to the Immigration officials. Do Rosa hid in one of the compartments while the steamer was In the lower harbor and a thorough search of the vessel had to be made before he was found. Returns From Austria Among the first-cabin passengers was Miss Charlotte Kont Kidder, profes sional pianist, who has been in Trieste for nearly three years and is returning to New York. She said conditions are improving very slowly in Austria. Oscar Bopp von Oberstadt .of Mo- Henry, 111, who has been .visiting his married daughters In Austria, returned on the steamer. Another passenger was Nino Ronchl, an Italian artist, who is i going to New York. Nina Gabriele, a Rumanian' singer who has achieved success In her own country, came over on the steamer to Join the forces of the Metropolitan Opera Company. It is her first visit to America. The immigrants on the Martha Washington were principally Italians, Greeks and Rumanians. They were among the ! first of these nationalities to arrive. It was apparent today that the No- 'vember quota for Great Britain would be filled by tomorrow, and some of those who will arrive later in the week will face" deportation. Following the Martha Washington up the harbor was the Cunarder Carmania. She berthed at East Boston, and, after landing her big list of passengers, the steamer resumed her passage to New York. She was. diverted to Boston to hasten the examination of her passengers owing to the congestion at Ellis Island. Steamer Megantic of the White Star Line, Capt Berry, from Liverpool and Queenstown, received pratique after the Carmania was examined by the port doctors, and proceeded to Commonwealth Pier. Group of Brides-Elect On board were two cabin passengers, 800 second class and 893 third class. Hundreds of high-grade mechanics, domestics, young women typists, trained nurses, shipyard workers and other artisans came over on the vessel. In an' effort to secure employment, owing to the hard times in the British Isles. The list on the Megantic was also remarkable because of the large number of women and young children. In the third class there were 124 unaccompanied mothers and children Who were in charge of Miss V. Cain, the White Star Line conductress. A group of young women camo over on the vessel to meet their intended husbands, among them being Miss Ruby Aitchison, a pretty Scotch lassie, who was met at the pier by her intended husband, Thomas Campbell of By-onne, N J. Miss Elizabeth Heatherwick came over to wed Thomas Bennett, who is In business in Los Angeles. She was ac companied by Mrs Rose Bennett, the groom's mother. Miss Alice McG. Thornton came from Greenock to marry Archie McAllister, an engineer at the Ford plant in Detroit. Miss IM. A. Steele will become the bride of Thomas Armitage of Kearney, N J, and Miss Mary Bottomly, a trained nurse, will marry Alfred Craven of this city. reshipped on the Berengaria for South ampton. The Berengaria arrived at Southampton a week ago Monday, and the 700 were put on a special train and hurried to Liverpool to be in time for the sail ing of the Carmania. They had less than 24 hours, and were fortunate enough to arrive on time. On Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock they were bound for America once more, and arrived with the Carmania today in time t come within the quota. British and Russian immigrants made up most of the passenger list, number ing approximately 800 each. The other 300 were of various nationalities, who i made a picturesque sight in the ear- ments of their various countries. There was a goodly scattering of Irish and Scotch on board. Born on Board There were hundreds of children on board, ranging in age from several days to 15 and 16 years of age. The anxious mothers had the littlt ones bundleH up in shawls and blankets while waiting in the cold, to land. Sorrow was felt by officers and crew, owing to the death of Patrick Finne-gan, aged 40, a fireman, who died on the boat yesterday. It was said that he was stricken with heart trouble. On arrival the body was turned over to the medical examiner of the Northern District, who will perform an autopsy. Mrs Zelva Leinov, a Russian immigrant In the second cabin, gave birth to a bahy boy on Tuesday. The stork arrived while the boat was a few hundred miles off the Massachusetts coast, and as all preparations were made, Sonny Leinov and mother are doing well at present. They were carefully moved to the Homeopathic Hospital, the ambulance awaiting the arrival. Waiting here long enough to debark he passengers and unload the luggage. Capt S. G. S. McNeil then took his vessel to New York, where 22 passengers, including 10 second and 12 third will leave. The Cunarder Samaria reached port this afternoon with 2096 passengers, including 36 first, 157 second and 700 third-class frdm Liverpool, and eight first, 533 second and 672 third from Glasgow. The majority of aliens on board are English, Irish and Scotch, but there are also many Africans, Belgians, Bulgarians, Czecho-SloVaklans, Danes, Finns, French, Germans, Hollanders, East Indians, Italians, Jugo-Slavs, Latvians, Norwegians, Poles, Russians and Swiss on board. It is expected that the Franconia, also of the Cunard Line, will clock about 5 o'clock with her 137i passengers, who went on board at Liverpool and Queens-town. Professional Football Player Amons the passengers was John Houghton from Blackpool, Eng, a pro ltessional football player, who was captain and fullback of some of the best teams in England, Including the Norwich City, Fulhams and Glasgow Rangers. He was accompanied by his wife and three children. The family hii ro to Cleveland to settle. Miss Jean Rainey, another passenger will marry John Callahan of this city. Mrs M. P. Peters, a Scotch mezzo so- ,o nr, -hnne nrof essiona 1 name is Peggy Highlands, came over to Join her husband. Mrs M. C. Burkitt with her sons, Samuel, aged 6, and William, 8, will Join relatives at Philadelphia. The Boys were dressed In kilties. Mrs A. Hughes and her son came from Glasgow to Join her husband in Yonkers. Mrs Alfred Jones and Mrs J. Jack of Halifax were first cabin passengers. They will return home on the steamer when she leaves nex Tuesday. The Megantic encountered some rough weather in crossing, but there was no delay In making port. She called at Halifax, where she landed 110 passengers destined for that city. Owing to delay in receiving the quota of the different nationalities from Wash ington the examination of the passengers on the different steamers was held up for two hours. It is doubtful if all the aliens can be examined today. Steamship Franconia, from Liverpool and Queenstown, will arrive late this afternoon with 1350 passengers. Only the citizens will be landed today on account of the late hour of arrival. THESE 700 HAVE HAD ENOUGH OF OCEAN Of the 1987 passengers of the Cunard liner Carmania, who debarked at the East Boston Pier this morning, approximately 700 had seen as much of the ocean as they want for a lifetime. These were British and Russian immigrants', who were on board the steamship Scythia when she was in collision with the Cedric, off the coast of Ireland. As a result of the crash, the 700 were put on hoard the Coronia and rushed to New York. When they arrived, it was found that the October quota had been filled and with heavy hearts they Year's Quotas Nearly Filled According: to figures and a statement recently given out by Commissioner Husband of the United States Immigration Bureau, most of the European countries will, have exhausted their quotas by this month. Under the law, 20 percent of each yearly quota can come in monthly until the entire quota is exhausted. This being the fifth month the fiscal vear. " seems most probable that every European country with the exception of Germany will have exhausted its quota in a few days. Albania Belgium. Bulgaria, Great r1uain', ee?e Ita,v- Switzerland, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland. Russia. Syria, Turkey, Palestine. Africa. Australia and New Zealand have sent in the largest numbers so far this year, and hut a few more will be allowed in 'n in il lUULU, For the year, the entire EuroDean quota is 357,803. and up to Oct 17 229 284 ha,V3,keen admitted, while for last year only 13o,i44 had entered. ?ahZ flgure.s ?how that the increase has been principally from Eastern and Northern European countries Great with1 61 Sn23,'??9 laSt vear.compa'red with bi.su to the present day of this year. Germany during the past 10 M ha has sent 30.091, compared with 10,309 of last year, and Sweden 13 337 compared with 4741 last year. Norway and Poland have sent twice as many this year. ' 995 SCOTS AND IRISH COME ASHORE AT PORTLAND PORTLAND, Me, Nov 1-Freighted with a cargo of humanity composed in the main of sturdy Scotch and Irish folk, forsaking the homeland because of the serious unemployment conditions there, the Cunard-Anchor liner Tuscania, from Glasgow and Londonderry, crept up the harbor early today to the State pier to discharge all except 70 of her 1388 passengers. The Scotch predominated, numbering 995, while there were 237 of Irish nationality. Anchored a short distance out, awaiting their turn at the pier, were the President Polk of the United States Lines, which arrived off the three-mile limit nearly a day ahead of the Tuscania, and the North German Lloyd steamship Seydlltz, with hundreds of other People aboard. The Polk was to have the next chance, it being expected the-Tuscania would be able to make way for her thiB afternoon. It was understood the docking privilege was regulated by the Federal officials by the order in which the ships were booked for today. Among the notables aboard the Tuscania were Surgeon Commander W. C, Carson, Lieut Commander Alexander R. Chalmer, Don Marquis, the columnist and author of New York, who had been abroad six months. Three or four hundred young skilled workmen were in the steerage. There were an unusually large number of children, the great majority of them with mothers who came over to join their husbands who emigrated In the Spring from their homes and have prospered sufficiently to send passage money for their families The steam-shy classification gave 174 children and 38 infants, the latter, as one offi cer expressed It, being "from no year eld to 1 year." OFFICIALLY NAME EX-SEN. KELLOGG Formal Announcement of Successor to Harvey WASHINGTON. Nov 1-Forma! an nouncement that President Coolldge has appointed Frank B. Kellogg, formerly Senator from Minnesota, to succeed Georgo Harvey as American Ambassador to London, was made today by the State Department. The announcement sufd Mr Kellogg'a selection had been found acceptable to the British Government, Drawn from hat shown by Chandler 6 Co. New Winter Hats I i Of smart simplicity. For every woman and every occasion. QUR new October hats are as individual and charming as the art of experienced Milliners carl make them. The exquisite velvets and brocades artistically combined with fur are beautifully brilliant and softly rich in color, as is our most attractive collection of lace and metal brocade hats; for tea, dance and dinner. Sports and Tailored Hats are priced ' $10 to $15 Dressy Tailored Hats some imported models $15 to $25 Dressier Hats from Paris from our own workrooms $25 to 150 40.000 Pais Made from About the Best Silk Used in Hosiery Century Pranb Silk Stockings Sweaters of Brushed Mohair and Worsted 6,95 0.75 (Worsted) (Mohair) NOVELTY PLAIDS AND STRIPINGS IN COMBINATIONS OF BUFF, ORANGE, BROWN, COPEN, SILVER, NAVY, WHITE, BLACK, BROWN HEATHER. t95 THE SILK THAT IS FULL OF LIFE, LUSTRE, ELASTICITY AND GLOSS. THE SILK THAT . IS SMOOTH, CLEAR, NEW AND BEAUTIFUL. THE SILK THAT IS IN STOCKINGS THAT FIT THE BEST, FEEL THE BEST, THAT WEAR THE BEST AND THAT ARE THE BEST. THE SILK ThTtIs USED IN ABOUT THE FINEST SILK STOCKINGS. Silk Waists Jacquette, Overblouse Styles 8.75 W50 OF CREPE DE CHINE, VELVET AND CUT CHENILLE. THE NEW VIONNET NECKLINE IS FEATURED ON MANY OJ THE OVERBLOUSE MODELS. IS? GWeS MODE and GRAY a direct importation, 12-button, Paris point embroidered, pique sewn. $3. 50 Girls' wS Dresses v civet NAVY, BROWN, BLACK straightline. oe wrap-around, or basque Btyles. 3tt ZtJ

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 18,000+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Boston Globe
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free