The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on March 7, 1955 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, March 7, 1955
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Page 7
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MONDAY MARCH 7, 1955 BLYTHBVILLB (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE SEVEN More Mechanical Brains Headed for Business Field By 8AM DAWSON NEW YORK (AP) — Mechanical brains cut down to handle the problems of the small business man are being offered in increasing numbers today. And still more are in the building or testing states. King-size electronic computers'* are already In the field to handle scientific and engineering problems so complex that the average man can't understand what they're trying to do, let alone how they do It. They are part of the move toward automation — with the theoretical goal a completely automatic factory—and some factory workers worry lest they spell loss of jobs. Smaller Computers Most of the companies in the business machine industry also are turning to the field of the smaller computers for specific purposes- such as helping oil companies tabulate automatically the flood of on- the-cuff transactions of their credit card customers ;or aiding finance companies handle mortgage loan accounting. Here are few of the new devices just being offered, or promised for delivery within the next year: National Cash Register Isays that early in 1950 It will install for commercial use the first of Its National Computers, priced at around $200.000. and tailored to the needs of "any business which can profitably use electronic computation." - The company has built a tape punching machine which can turn a cash register, accounting machine or adding machine into a device to feed recorded data directly Into the new computer, there to be handled by electronic rather than human brains. At a more lowly level, the company Is pushing a change-computing cash register. At checkout these machines show both the clerk and the customer the amount of each item, the total charge, the amount of money the customer offers in payment, and the change due. Underwood Corp. will market, at around $15.000, a baby brain for small business men. The electronic computer, Elecom 50, the company says, can handle an entire payroll In one operation — including computation and Itemizing of gross earnings, and deductions for income tax. hospltalization. defense bonds and social security tax. Farrington Manufacturing Co. of Boston will field test a new electronic system called Scandex, devised to let oil companies use automatic tabulation in their bookkeeping on gasoline credit cards. Boy Puts Pet on Block for 1 JM- « HELPS EASE ACHES AND PAINS—Penny Brannon, 9, ol Dallas, Tex., and her dog Clarabeile find that ice cream is an aid to their recovery from recent accidents. Penny's arm was brohen when struck by a baseball, and Clarabelle's hind leg was broken when she was hit by a car. Doctors say both patients will be in top shape by summer. Tomcat Saves Boy from Pond HOUSTON, Tex. f/Pi—Tiny, a tcm- today was credited with sav- a 21-month tot from drowning New York Times Editor Dies N7W YORK Wl — Frederick T Birchail. 84, acting manager editor of the New York Times from 1926 to 1931, died today at Dawson Memorial Hospital, Bridgewater. N. S. Army to Bring Tank Division Into Service WASHINGTON, Wh-The Army, putting new emphasU on the t»mc as an atomic «ge weapon, announced Saturday It Is bringing another armored division baclc Into service. The World War II-famed 3rd Armored Division, based at Ft. Knox, Ky., Is being converted Into a lull strength combat organization. At full strength, an armored division has about 14,600 men and almost 350 tanks. ... When accomplished, this, will bring the total of U. S. armored divisions to four—the 1st and 4tft based at Ft. Hood. Tex.; the Jnd in Germany; the 3rd at -Ft. Knox. The 3rd division Is expected to be at top strength In September, the Army said. Horse, Lariat Used to Save Drowning Man SAN FRANCISCO W) — A patrolman used a horse and iarlat to save Robert B. Malone from drowning off Ocean Beach yesterday after Malone had plunged to the aid of another distressed swimmer. Carrying the rope. Patrolman Arthur Hagstrom. 28, swam out to Malone, nearly unconscious In the surf from fighting an ebb tide undertow. Hagstrom pulled Malone, 39 Daly City accountant, toward shore until he was nearly exhausted. Nick Papazian rodeh is horse oul to Hagstrom, who looped the lariat to Papazian's saddle. The horse then pulled Malone to shore with Hagstrom holding his head, out of water. Hagstrom is a former lifeguard. Bruce McFarland, 28, whose wave for help Malone had an swered. came safely to shore by himself. The ebb current's pull stopped, explained McFarland, "01 I wouldn't be here." cat, ing in a fish pond. The boy. Karam Habib, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joesph Habib of Zanesville O., fell into a fish pond at the home of Fred T. Noomle! Petite Riviere, 18 miles from Friday night. The Habibs were j Bridge-water. In recent years he had been liv- ng in retirement at his home at son's body. The child was revived by t'icial respiration. _. DI Lr A visiting there. Dog on blocK tor whcn M,,. Habib misse d her! n ™-- B -,v cn _ f* C J *° n ' sne started searching- Notic- i tlve j£OUr VtfQntp rUnflSjing the cat peerine into the fish 1 J pond, she investigated and saw her MEMPHIS lifi — A Jonfsboro, Ark., boy has put his pet dog on the sales block for the price of a trip to Boy Scout camp. Memphis police said that Jesse Hriger of Jonfisboro had written them, offering to sell hts doe—a "good crook catcher"— to the Memphis Police Department sn he will have money to go to Boy Scout camp. He added this postscript; "It'll cost $6(1 In ?o to camp." The cause of death was not In- eluded in the notification received , ett no c i ose rela . GHEATKST VOC AIH'LARV It has been said tliiit the vocabulary of Victor HUKO was the greatest in literature. The great French novelist and poet was a master of lan^uaue and could write as much as 10,000 words a clay uhen he wanted to do so. EASTMAN KODAKS Movie Cameras KIRBY DRUG STORES ALUMINUM AWNINGS f»r CALL NOW Ph. 3-4293 FOR FREE ESTIMATE SMITH AWNING CO. 113 S. First THE RIGHT STEP to HALTER'S for shoes like New! HALTER'S QUALITY SHOE SHOP 121 W. Main Ph. 2-2732 WE BUY USED FURNITURE PHONE 3-3122 Wade Furn. Co. Deer stamp on any snake leave the flattened carcass. ANOTHER NAME The famous painting of "Mona Lisa" often is referred to as "La Gionconrtn." She was the wife of Znnobi del Giocondo and La Gioconda is a feminine form of her husband's last name. River No Place For Hot Rods LOS ANGELES tffl — The Lo: Angeles River is just rolling along today — without hot rods. Police rounded up about 151 youngsters who were racing soupet up jalopies on the dry, paved rive bottom yesterday. About 30 othe cars left the police waiting on the levee and escaped up the San Fer nando Road ramp. Police made no arrests but ex plained to the youngsters that a river, even without water, river and not a race track. is a WATER FROM DISTANCE The water supply of Los Angeles is brought 238 miles by aqueduct from the Owens River and one-sixth comes 392 miles from the Parker Dam on the Colorado River. MODERN TRAFFIC needs concrete pavement Highway traffic has increased steadily in weight and volume. Yet for more than a quarter of z century thousands of miles of concrete roads have rendered uninterrupted service. They are today still carrying most of the heaviest traffic. Concrete mcct.i every requirement of modern traffic. It is moderate in first cost. It has lower maintenance cost and «t least twice the service life of other pavements. It is the safest pavement too. Its gritty surface grips tires firmly, permitting quicker stopl in emergencies. Its light-colored surface allows maximum visibility »t night. Ij you can't see you can't be safe. Mr. Nfotorist, your license fees, gas and other taxes pay for building and maintaining roads. Insist on concrete for ««fety, economy and durability. Concrete is your best pavement buy* Additional traffic lanes of concrete on U. S. 61-63 will give added safety on this heavily traveled route. Concrete roads will piny an important part in (he future of this rapidly expanding area. Insist on concrete and you'll get roads that will meet traffic demands and he safe for many, many years to come. PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION »I6 FALLS SUILDING, MfMPHIS 3, TENNESSEI < n«M «|«|I*|M » liwm tM Hind tin m d pMfcwl cmM uri (trxiMi. .. Htm** sdinffli ,««r* ml ml hi hM Hit "HOT" HEAD-Presumably Just the thing for a gal carrying a torch is this "inflammable" hairdo by German coiffeur Frederic Cise-Koester. What appear to be pigtails are really meant to simulate flames. HUGE VALLEY I from Montana to Missouri, Includ-1 braces nearly one-sixth of the to- The Missouri Valley extends j Ing parts of 10 states, and em-1 tal area of the United Btata*. KCHTUCKY SJftlCHT IOURIOK DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY YELLOWSTONE, INC. LOUISVILLE, KY. ITEMIZED WATER BILLS The water bill, whether On flat rate or meter charge, is seldom received with a smile. Water is free to all, yet every month or so along comes a bill with unexplained charges. Why can't the water department itemize the bills? That would be hard to do, for most items carry no price tag. But if you want to take a shot at it, these items might be a guide to you: Taking Care of the Watershed $ Maintenance and Operation of the Pumps or Intakes Amortization and Maintenance of Lines to the Plant . Filtering, Softening and Purifying of all water distributed Storage to meet all emergencies Authorization and Maintenance of the Distributing lines.. Meter Maintenance and Reading Billing and Collecting Repayment of Capital Outlav Surplus for further Extension For all these services, the customer pays 10 cents a ton, the lowest price for any commodity he buys. And the most essential he buys. Blytheville Water Co. "Water Is Your Cheapest Commodity" NOW! Your best buy CONQRETE COQ&ERATES WJTH VOU» EYES AND YOUR BRAKES Light-dufy INTERNATIONAL Trucks with AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION Now INTERNATIONAL light-duty models give you new economy, efficiency and driving ease-automatically. The newest, finest automatic transmission offers extra pulling power for smooth, fast starts under load. And its direct-gear drive in high assures the economy of a conventional transmission-with the same "solid" feel, absence of slippage and sensation of high engine speed, plus full engine aid for downhill braking. This new automatic transmission is available at slight extra cost in all light-duty models. New Overdrive Transmission also available for ONE HUNDRED and R-110 Series models. Come in and let us give you all the reasons why a new INTERNATIONAL light-duty truck with automatic transmission is automatically your best truck buy. Saves You Money—Many Wayi • Provides the effort-saving, engine-savirtg, fuel*saving advantages of correctly-timed automatic shifting — p4w Hie add*d economy of direct-gear drive in high. • Reduces engine, transmission, drive-line and tire wear through smooth, properly-limed shifting. Eliminate clutch and clutch servicing. Cuts maintenance ccptb. • Saves time in traffic due to simpler, easier driving effort m«ons greater safety. Your trade-in may cover the down payment. Ask obovf owr convenwnf term*. DELTA IMPLEMENTS, INC. Blythevill* Phon« 3-6863 I SM ft.. .«•»»'• *** TV (.», "Tfc. Mall, of Ivy," wlt/i KonoM Colmon ond g.nDo Hum., Tu.tdayi, CtS-Tf.tM ».*., HT 1 INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS Standard of Ihr Hiqh,

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