El Paso Herald from El Paso, Texas on November 22, 1911 · Page 5
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El Paso Herald from El Paso, Texas · Page 5

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El Paso, Texas
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Wednesday, November 22, 1911
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Page 5
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EL PASO HERALD Wednesday, Noy, 22, 1911 To Prepare ^ V/ < ? 7 hanksgiving Day Dinner Oun ethics in the business world are: To sell the best groceries obtainable; to mark them as low as good groceries will allow; to guarantee every article sold; to cheerfully rectify any mistakes, and to treat each person who enters our store as a guest, extending the same courtesy when looking as when purchasing. We hold the confidence and patronage of thousands of El Paso people, and we want to do the same with you. Won’t you give us an opportunity? We are better prepared to serve you for Thanksgiving than ever before. New Heinz Mince Meat, pound ................... New Citron, pound ................................ New Orange and Lemon Peel, lb.............................. New Shelled Pecans, pound ........................ New Shelled Walnuts, pound ................................ New Shelled Almonds, pound ................................ New Fruit Cake, 6 lb. boxes............ Fruit Cake, boxes .................... Apple Cider, bottle gallon .................. Brazil Nuts, pound .............................. New Walnuts, pound .............................. New Almonds, pound .............................. New Filberts pound .......................... New »Seeded Raisins, 2 packages .................... New Currants, 2 packages .................... New 1 lb. New 15c; New 20c 30c 25c 75c 60c 60c $1 50 30c 60c 25c 25c 25 c 25c 25c 25c PHONE 353 Fancy Imported Figs, pound .................... y • Fancy Imported Layer Raisins, lb .................... Fancy Cranberries, 2 q<ts. for....................... Fancy Celery, 3 bunches for................ Fancy Head Lettuce, 2 'bunches for................. Fancy Green Beans, pound ........................ Fancy Lima Beans, pound .......................... Fancy Cucumbers, each .......................... Fancy Summer ■ Squash, lb................ Fancy Okra, pound ........................ Fancy Rhubarb, pound ........................ Fancy Pumpkins and Hubbard Squasih, l b.................... Fancy Egg Plant, 1 A pound ..................................Awl* Fancy Grapes, basket .............................. Fancy Peaches, basket ............................ Fancy Mexican Strawberries, box.................... 30c 35c 25c ..25c ...15c ..15c 15c 5c 12^c 15c 10c 3c 0c 50& 50c 20c ÄföANBßftNl COFFEE WANTED Furnished and unfurnished houses. We have first- class tenants ready and waiting to rent at once. Austin & mmfi Bell Phones 4350—4351. . , - T-'- v ">•& . ■■ rv^vre:' • . ; - vv- • :v-W • *!• vir -■ \ ^ Æf -------------------------------------------- ï-nui ■'*■■■ ■— . - ---HUNTERS Entra IT« IS Elephant Butte Men Meet Gang That Gave Battle to Officers. Elephant Butte, N. M., Nov. 22.—The hunting- party, composed of Daniel and Benjamin Taylor, Otis MacIntyre, Walter Karcher and Press Armor, has returned to camp from a ten days’ trip in the Black range. Three deer and numerous squirrels were the game secured. While out in camp the party unknowingly entertained the three desperadoes who escaped jail at Deming recently. The desperadoes were mounted and armed with rifles. They remained with the hunters only about 15 minutes, and made some inquiry concerning the lay of the country. One seemed, however, to be quite familiar with the country. These were the three desperadoes A Thanksgiving Sale That Has Made Good New and Greater Values Tomorrow— Clothing Values That Are Simply Marvelous This sale can’t last forever, so if you are going to reap the benefits from it don’t put off your visit another day. Our entire stock of clothing, furnishing goods, hats and shoes go at from 20 percent to 50 percent discount. ( Suits and Overcoats Boy’s Suits and Overcoats $12.50 Suits and Ovencoa/ts in cheviots ajid case ¡meres—neat stylish patterns; speciaj. at.. $15.00 suits and overcoats, guaranteed pure wool—hi:gh grade garments; special .................. $18.50 Suits and Overcoats—rpure wool—-'hand tailored suits for »Sunday or ¡business wear; special.................................................................... $20.00 Suit® and Overcoats in tan, brouwn, gray and blue—new diagonals—and many other pleasing patterns. All $20.00 Suits and Overcoats ......................... $22.50 Suits and Overcoats—handsomely tailored from the newest fabrics; special................ $25.00 Suits and Overcoats-:—splendidly hand tailored garments ■—»elect ¡models; garments you’ll find priced 1 Q O elsewhere at $30.00. Special here.........................V * i/ • v/ $ 10.00 $11.90 . tailored suits $14.80 and blue—new $15.95 $17.95 $4.00 boys suits—splendid fabrics, suit» that will give splendid service; sipeeial ...................... $4.50 suits in cnasimerea, serges and worsted, excellent garments. Sale price . .. .' .................... $5.00 suits—good looking—rperfect fitting; an exceptional value ................................................. $7.00 boys’ suits of pure wool, all tüie newest fabrics. Sale price ................................................... $7.50 suits—the best fitting—best looking garments in El Paso. »Sale price ................ . . . $3.15 $3.39 $3.90 $5.65 $5.90 $30.00 highest grade Suits and Overcoats for...............................$23.90 $32.50 highest grade Suits and Overcoats for...............................$25.90 $35.00 highest grade Suits and Overcoats for...............................$27.90 $37.50 highest grade Suits and Overcoats for...............................$29.90 $40.00 highest grade Suits and \ Overcoats for...............................$31.90 BOYS’ HATS $1.00 Boys’ Hats fox $1.25 Boys’ Hats for $1.50 Boys’ Hats for ..85c . 98c $1.19 BOYS’ UNDERWEAR 50c Dr. Wrighit’s Health Underwear for .............. 50c fleece lined Union Suits for............................. 25c children’s ribbed fleece lined Underwear........ . 39c . .39c . .19c Boy’s Shoes at great Reductions Fiannei Shirts vv..; SCHLOSS BROSCE FINE CLOTHES MAKERS 6AIT1M0RE 6 NEW YORK $1.00 flannel shirts go at .............. 80c $1.25 flannel shirts go at .............. 98c $1.50 flannel shirts go at............ $1.15 $1.75 flannel shirts go at ............ $1.29 $2.00 flannel shirts go at...........$1.49 $2.50 flannel shirts go at ............ $1.90 $3.00 flannel shirts go at............ $2.30 ALL 50c WORK SHIRTS, 3 for $1.00 SHOIIIDBÍ KEPT f P1ÜIIC Bankers’ Association President Says Currency Re*/ form Decentralization ... - who later were met by the posse at the source of the Gila, where a battle occurred, in which one of the outlaws and tw'o of the posse were killed. Considerable excitement was occasioned here when the nev/s of the battle was received. 'Mr. Hall was a w-ell known man. His son, Ed Hall, is the famous roper of New Mexico. A circus arrived in camp over the branch railroad. Two cars carried the equipment and performers. A rock rolled down the hill and struck Tom Williams on the left leg and Inflicted a painful although not serious injury. Mr. Williams was engaged as foreman on derrick No. 5 on the flum«* when the accident occurred. Zenas D. Clark met w'ith an injury from an unusual cause. He was splitting kindling when a piece of wood flew up and struck him on tlie^lip, inflicting a painful wound, in which the camp physician, Dr. J. Dale Graham, put a stitch. Foreman Preusser has been transferred from work on the flume to widening the wagon road which goes under Ash canyon bridge. Only twro derricks are now working on the excavation for they flume, the others having completed the w'ork designated for them. The forms for the engine foundations for the east tower are in place, as well as the anchor bolts, and the pouring of concrete has begun. means more than a fat baby. It means laying the foundation of a strong, sturdy constitution. Fat alone is not enough; there must be bone, muscle, brain and nerves. Scott’s Emulsion is the Acme of perfection for Mother and Child. ALL DRUGGIST* 11-61 El, PASO WOMAN’S TIP OTHER. A PECOS LAWYER, TO WED Pecos, Tex., Nov. 22.—Announcement has been made at Carlsbad, N. M., of the engagement of Miss Mabel Rarey, of that city and Will P. Brady, of Pecos, at present district attorney for this part of Texas. Miss Rarey has for sev- ! eral years past taken considerable part ' in New Mexico social life and -Ah-. Brady, I since coming to Pecos from Austin sev- i eral years ago, has become one of the I best kiiown public men in west Texas. I He is a brother of Mrs. D. T. White, of ! E] Paso. They will be married at St. ! Nicholas church, Carlsbad. November 30.. PECOS. TEX.. MAY START A RAll,ROAD TO MISSOURI Pecos, Tex., Nov. 22.—M. ,T. Healy, promoter of the Denver Rocky Mountain & Gulf railway and the Panhandle, Pecos & Gulf railway, has written parties here that he will be* ready to submit a proposition to Pecos in the next 30 days for the construction of a line of railroad out of this city to- ards Kansas City. A bonus is beiiig offered here for such a line. New Orleans, La., Nov. 22.— If the proposed plan for the reform cf the currency and banking system of the United States be kept nonpartisan, its enactment into law will be an easy accomplishment. And it could be kept a nonpartisan issue, if the 4000 bankers here would work zealously to that end upon their return home. So declared F. O. Watts, president of the American Bankers’ association, in addressing the convention of its members here Tuesday. Mr. Watts strayed, he said, from the beaten path of precedent, to discuss the theme which has been made the keynote of the convention proceedings. “Surely there is no good reason why the question should become a partisan one,” he said. “There is no party principle involved in such a cooperative agency and nothing but prejudice of the extremity for an issue, which certainly does not exist in this day, could cause either of the two great political parties to treat the subject differently from what they should proposals for good health or pure food, or river improvements, or the building of a great canal. “We can show tliat instead of being centralization the proposal is decentralization, the power coming to the central agency for all banks in just such a way as the pow6r is placed in tne chief executive of the nation. The president becomes the composite of American ideas, and when not so there occurs a shifting cf authority. So the •Central Reserve association would always be the composite of the shareholding banks, and, therefore, standins: for the best in our business life. “Undoubtedly those interests which according to the passing speech and hurried composition are designated as ‘Wall Street’ favor the National Reserve association or any plan of monetary reform making for stability and prosperity and relieving the best bankers of New York from the great strain of crop movements, trade expansion and panics. Passing the relatively small number of stock gamblers around New York’s Stock exchange, we find there banks, business houses, industrial and railway corporations vitally interested in every section of the country and who have learned what one aptly expressed during the year in saying that his institution and allied interests ‘make dollars out of the general prosperity of the country where they could make only pennies out of special privilege.’ The real Wall Street prefers prosperity to special privilege, and knows that thev serve themselves most when building' up the commercial, manufacturing, agricultural, transportation and banking interests of the whole country.” Farnsworth’s Report. New York still tops all other states with membership in the American Bankers’ association, according to the repor* of Fred E. Farnsworth, of New York general secretary of the association. Of the 12,072 institutions having membership in the organization, 919, or approximately one in every 13, hails from New York. Pennsylvania comes next with 812 and Illinois is a close third with 799. Fourth place is claimed by California with o 10 hard pressed by Ohio, with f>09 the five states named furnishing- 3549 members or nearly one- third of tho entire enrolment. The annual income of the association Mr. Farnworth’s report proclaimed, w*a 3 $205,726 for ’the past fiscal year. Of this sum. tlie annual dues constitute $199,972 having reached that figure from $127,750 in 1905, and $11,606 in 1875. Mr. Farnsworth touched upon the proposed National Reserve association, declaring that the currency commission “will hold itself in readiness to prosecute a vigorous campaign w'hen the proposed measure shall be framed as a bill and will come before congress.” Warbnr« on Wall Strpot’s DanRfr. Likening Wall street to a ruler sitting upon a keg- of dynamite. Paul M. Warburg, of Kuhn, Eoeb & Co., in an address declared that the National Reserve association would take the monetary system of the country from the control of Wall street interests and give the United States an elastic system such as never enjoyed before. “Wall street, at present is a ruler on a keg of dynamite.” Mr. Warburg said. “and like many an absolute ruler in re- j cent years it find* It more conducive to j safetv and happiness to forego some of its prerogatives, thrust upon New York not by Its own will but as a result of our present laws and conditions, and to turn a money oligarchy into^ a constitutional democratic federation. “The great weakness of American banking, as compared with European banking," he said, “lay in the dangerously large use of stock excnange collateral as the basis for bank loans instead of the use, as in Europe, of commercial paper arising out of the normal day-to-day movement of goods from producers to consumers. “The overflow of money, which in times of ease floods New York, and which in times of need, is withdrawn with such vehemence that it causes violent convulsions is no blessing;, but a source of danger to that city. While our present system makes New' York the undoubted ^monev center and gives to its banks a position of preeminence and predominance, this power is possessed only at the expense of a responsibility whlcb with our present system, in times o'- stress brings mortification.’ The National Reserve association, i£ enacted into law, will take the monetary system of the United States out of Wall street.*’ * Goff OfferN Suggestion. The relation of state banks, saviners banks and trust companies to the National Reserve association plan, was the subject of an address delivered today by F. H. Goff, preident of the Cleveland Trust company, of Cleveland, O. Mr. Goff praised the socalled Aldrich plan and offered suggestions for its extension to include institutions now without the pale of the proposed measure. “The more carefully the plan proposed by senator Aldrich is considered, the more practicable, ingenious and comprehensive it seems,” he said. Strong- Endorse.«» Plan. The effect of the adoption of the so- called Aldrich monetary scheme upon the interest rates, earnings, dividends and taxation of banks—especially of smaller banks—was the» subject of an address by Benjamin Strong, jr., vice president of the Bankers’ Trust company of New York. Mr. Strong predicted that the National Reserve associa- j tion, embraced in the plan, would cure ! such objections to the employment of the credit of country banks for the purpose of making provision for the needs of their customers. He said in part: “The purposes to be accomplished by monetary legislation are stated by senator Aldrich in his letter of January 16 to to be the ‘unification of our banking institutions into one comprehensive system,’ the establishment of a ‘scientific basis for bank note circulation,’ and the ‘creation of a discount market similar to the discount markets in Europe.’ The keystone of the proposed plan is the assembling of a large part of the scattered bank reserves into the custody of the Reserve association, thus making them actively useful. Schurman Endorses Plan. Proposed changes in the tariff and trust laws of the United States, vital as they may be, fade into the background in importance beside the necessity for a sound banking and cur­ rency system, in the opinion of presi- i dent Schurman of Cornell university, j In addressing the association today president Schurman so declared, adding j his endorsement of the National Reserve association plan and offering his cooperation to the association, if it * should be desired or needed, in securing its enactment into law. Reynolds I rffes Reform. “If the proposed National Reserve association plan becomse a law, it will j provide an institution which will be able to extend credit in proportion to • all the reasonable needs of business in this country and at the same time safeguard against the over expansion j of credit.” declared George M. Reynolds, president of the Continental and Commercial National bank of Chicago, j While the proposed plan is not a wide j departure from the present system, he , said, it would correct the present plan’s > weaknesses and furnish the machinery I for the natural ebb and flow of busi- j nes; w'hile it provides for centralizing , the resources of the country, it did not j provide for centralizing the power, j He continued: “In view' of the agitation for cur- | rency legislation which has been going j on during the past three or four years, j or since the panic of 1907, w'hlch I brought the citizens of this country to a realization of the pressing need ] for currency reform, I assume that the ( business public, generally, recognizes j the weaknesses and the deficiencies of our present banking and currency system. “The system Is unscientific, and the fact that'it has served us as well as it j has, and that we have not had more j frequent panics or seasons of severe depression in business, is due very j largely to the growing use of credit in i business transactions in this country” | Chicago banker’s Address. The proposed plan for a na- j tlonal reserve association w'ould | place the banking and currency ; sy'stem of the United States in the front, ranks of those of the I of the First National bank of Chi- j cago, who addressed the convention of | the Aemrican Bankers’ association | here today. “Under the proposed plan,” Mr. Fortran said, “the minds of the local depositors in our banks would be diverted from the small lawful cash reserves they individually maintain. Attention would be directed, rather, to the fact that the banks were affiliated with a central association, maintaining and controling for them their lawful j reserves and standing ready to supply | them with its circulating notes whenever necessary. The plan suggested [ will, therefore, afford our banks the } principal advantages of the branch banking system, without surrendering their individuality of ownership, their interest in loend affairs or the local control of their interest.” An important element of the Reserve association’s strength, he thought, would be Its foreign bills and government securities, which could be increased or diminished according to needs. Another source of strength, which would develop as its business expanded Mr. Forgan said, would be its accumulation of reserve money The Only Thing • 1 ^¿■1 UZZI ------- ■------- : ---If you want good safe milk patronize tlie only dairy that pasteurizes their milk. Pasteurized Milk Is the only milk you can depend upon. El Paso Dairy Co. Office 423 No. Oregon St. gradually finding its way into its vaults. “The demand for its circulating notes will fluctuate with the seasons. When crops are bing moved, the demand for will be at its height. At such the banks will nave to support reserve balances with the Nat- Reserve association, against which they may have currency shipped to them, by rediscounting their available paper. As the business demand for circulating notes declines, they will return to the banks and through them to the branches of the National Reserve association for credit on deposit. Simultaneously will mature the rediscounts on wrhich the increased issue of notes w'as based.” The lawful monpv reserve of the association, he thought, would be but little affected by its domestic business transactions. Both Phones. them times their ional FI XERAL OF DR- WYMAN. Washington, D. C., Nov. 23.—Th« body' of Walter Wyman, surgeon general of the public health and marine hospital service, who died early yesterday, was taken .last night to St. Louis, his birthplace. Funeral service will be held in St. Louis on Friday with interment in Belle Fontaine cemetery. On that day the flags on every station of the public health and marine hospital service throughout the country will be lowrered to half mast. Thanksgiving hats for gentlemen, at Bryan Bros. I.atest. styles in silk and lace scarfs —Kline’s Curio Store. Thanksgiving gloves at Bryan Bros. for gentlemen, Pasteurized milk is safe. I, a dies’ long coats cleaned Wright. Full measure at Southwestern Fuel Co. You Know that Procrastination Is the Thief of Time. Then Why Defer Coming to Sam Gold’s Great Hurry Up Sale ■' !ivÀv: VC 'ÄWstf > i‘\: C • Now in full blast, and supply yourself, as your neighbor has done, at a saving of half? Come now while the stock is full up. Others are doing so, why not you? The sale only lasts fifteen days. SO DON’T PROCRASTINATE 111 SAN ANTONIO STREET, EL PASO, TEXAS

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